About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

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Entries in demographics (8)

Wednesday
Oct092013

An Infographic Profile of the Modern Travel Blogger

An Infographic Profile of the Modern Travel Blogger

An Infographic Profile of the Modern Travel Blogger from the Sandymount Hotel in Dublin, Ireland, takes a closer look at answering the question “Who are these travel bloggers?”

As today marks the start of the TBEX European Conference – the world’s largest gathering of travel bloggers, writers and new media content creators – we thought we would celebrate their choice of Dublin as this years’ venue with an infographic profile of the modern travel blogger.

Today and tomorrow, Dublin will play host to scores of travel bloggers and writers, but what makes a contemporary travel blogger? It’s an interesting and pertinent question – it’s a demanding occupation (albeit a fun one!) and one that requires a huge amount of hard work, dedication and the potential of not making a huge amount of money, at least in the formative years.

So what’s the average profile of the modern travel blogger? How old are they? What countries do they visit? How do they monetise their writing and what contemporary technology do they utilise to facilitate their writing? To answer these questions and numerous others, we completed an in-depth survey of travel bloggers, giving us some revealing and unique insights into what makes up a travel blogger.

Rather than present all our finding in a page of text, we thought we’d turn them into a far more eye-catching format, so here’s our infographic profile of the modern travel blogger:

The design is clean with a great color palette.  It’s easy for readers to look through the information quickly.

A few of the statistics are shown in text only, while others are visualized.  The stats in text only will be perceived as less important by readers, and I don’t think that was the intent of the designers.  If the data is important enough to include in the infographic, they should also be visualized.

Thanks to David for sending in the link!

Friday
Jul122013

Battle of the (Social) Sexes

Battle of the (Social) Sexes infographic

The Battle of the (Social) Sexes infographic from InternetServiceProviders.org explores some of the demographic data behind social media.

You’ve no doubt heard the old, oft-quoted adage, “men are from Mars, women are from Venus,” used to denote the fact that men and women may not always see completely eye to eye. While this light-hearted statement isn’t taken literally, when it comes to the virtual world of Internet interactions, similar sentiments may be formed surrounding the different ways men and women use social networking. While the majority of adults in the US are plugged into some sort of social media outlet, not all of them are used in equal measure, and not all of them are used by both genders equally. For instance, the average Google+ user spend just three minutes per month on the network, while the average Facebook user will spend 405 minutes per month updating statuses, posting pictures, and checking out others’ profiles. So what can be learned about men and women in the world of the web? As is turns out, men and women tend to dominate very different social media networks. The following infographic takes a look at some of the differences between male and female-dominated social media sites: How many users each one has, as well as how they interact.

There’s so really good data they have compiled in here, and most of the data visualizations are easy to understand.  I would not have expected to see that Twitter has 40 million more female users each month.

There are a handful of minor tweaks that would help improve the design:

  • The salmon/orange/peach color for women is unexpected compared to the traditional pink.
  • Go ahead and use the official Twitter and Facebook icons.  No need to design their own.
  • The pie slices for time spent would work much better with colors that are more distinct.  The different shades of gray are very hard to differentiate.
  • For the pie charts, the text label should be placed next to the pie slice its describing, instead of the opposite side as shown in this design.  Flipping the pie charts horizontally would fix that easily.

I appreciate the clear Creative Commons license in the footer, but the URL to the original infographic lansing page is missing.  Since the infographic image file is shared by itself, the URL always helps readers to find the original.

Found on Ragan’s PR Daily

 

Monday
Mar042013

SxSW 2013, an infographic

SxSW 2013, an infographic

Rocksauce Studios has released SxSW 2013, an infographic looking at the basic statistics and demographic data around this year’s South By Southwest conference in Austin , TX.

  • The seven SXSW events — gaming expo, interactive, film, trade show, music, music gear expo and flatstock — attracted an audience of more than 300,000 last year (though only a sliver were badge holders). The PDF offers an attendance breakdown.
  • Demographics: the largest percentage of attendees are between the ages of 31 and 40; 86 percent of registrants are from the U.S.; 60 percent of attendees are male; and 29 percent of festival goers work in the creative industries.
  • Five companies to see success with SXSW include Foursquare, Twitter, Gamesalad, Phonebooth and Foodspotting.
  • The 2013 SXSW festival runs March 8-17.

300,000 attendees last year, and this year looks to be even bigger! Not sure why they released it as a huge, high-resolution PDF file, but the you can download it here.

Thanks to David for sending in the link, and also found on the Austin Business Journal

HEY!  I’m headed down to Austin on Friday for SxSW, so I would love to hear from anyone else headed down there as well.  Should we have an infographics meetup?  

Friday
Feb012013

America's New Minority

America's New Minority infographic

The demographics of America are changing, and America’s New Minority from 59 Liberty shows us how far we have come and predicts the next 40 years.  

With the country’s changing demographics, whites will drop under 50% of the population in the 2040s. Every Republican Presidential candidate since 1968 has won the white vote, but with the population shift can the GOP compete?

This graphic simply presents the data of a changing electorate. We went through numerous iterations attempting to find something appealing that presented the data accurately.

We worked with Projects by Chi/Donahoe on concepts, Ripetungi on design, and Hustle Labs for PR support.

For direct access to the data used, please view the spreadsheet here.

I really like how simple and strong the message is with this design.  The data will be surprising to many people, so it should be popular with social sharing.

I LOVE that they include a link to the raw data in a Google Docs spreadsheet for anyone to get their hands on the raw numbers from the data sources.  The link is in the additional text on the infographic landing page.  It would be more effective if the URL of the infographic landing page and the Google Docs spreadsheet were both included in the infographic so they would be readily available to readers who see the infographic posted on other sites.

They also share some of the early drafts and other versions of the design they considered on the infographic landing page.  You can see a couple here, but there are more on the page at 59 liberty.

America's New Minority infographic

America's New Minority infographic

Wednesday
Jun132012

Digital Anatomy of the Affluent Male

Digital Anatomy of the Affluent Male infographic

Busy busy busy! The affluent male is always searching online! The Digital Anatomy of the Affluent Male from iprospect.com describes who the affluent male is and what he searches for.

There are 19 million affluent males on the Interent and they are shopping online and spending more than ever before.  Forty percent of them are shopping online 2x a week or more and spending over $30k annually.

I really like the design style and the colors on this one.  The correctly-highlighted map in his pocket and the cowboy boot are a nice touch.

The data visualizations do a good job, but there are a bunch of statistics that aren’t visualized and are left just in text.  Visually, this makes these other statistics less important because they didn’t warrant being visualized.  The favorite brands could use the actual logos, and the “What he’s searching for” could use some icons.

From an SEO perspective, the URL at the bottom really should be the landing page address, and once you get to the landing page, there aren’t any social sharing buttons so you are left to your own to figure out how to share it.

Also available as a PDF download.

Thanks to Douglas for sending in the link!

Tuesday
May012012

Following The White Rabbit

Following the White Rabbit Android Developer infographic

Who is the mastermind behind your favorite android application? Do you wonder what kind of music they like? The Following the White Rabbit infographic from Startapp.com gives us the low down on what kinds of people are behind Android applications based on a survey they did in March 2012.

Have you ever wondered what kind of people make Android applications? Well wonder no more! We at StartApp decided to investigate this in depth by creating a special Android developer survey which we sent out to all of our Android developers who kindly participated in the survey! Therefore, we are now very proud to present our first infographic that explores everything from the companies Android developers work for to the music they listen to and everything in between. Let us know what you think!

This is a cool infographic that does a good job with the visualizations.  With survey data, it’s a challenge to visualize the results correctly.  Some survey answers add up to 100%, but some questions are asked where the respondent can “check all that apply” so these answers are separate.  The pie charts in the coffee cups, the doughnut charts  and the stacked bar are examples of survey questions that add up to 100% (except the stacked bar adds up to 101% due to rounding, so they should have displayed the tens decimal place).

“What App Markets do you use?” and “What OS’s Do You Develop Apps for?” are some of the multiple answer questions, so the answers are displayed as separate bars or doughnut charts with the appropriate logos.  A couple results are displayed with the wrong type of graphic.  “How Many Apps Have You Published so far?” and “What Would Be Your Preferred Pastime” should both be shown adding up to 100%.

The overall design is a bit crowded with a lot of visual noise, but the statistics are easy to understand.  The coffee-brown color and the overlapping visualizations give the visual impression of working late nights and juggling many details, just like an app coder does.

At the bottom, there should be a copyright statement and the URL to find the original infographic landing page.

Found on Infographic Journal

Tuesday
Apr122011

The Current State of Social Networks #infographic

From ignite, a social media agency, comes The Current State of Social Networks.

It goes without saying that Facebook is the network du jour, but even though the reigning champion’s user stats keep soaring, social networking as a whole might be leveling off. Nevertheless, there are still scores of other highly competitive social sites that are waxing and waning; and different networks and apps are more popular in specific geographic areas, with certain genders or age groups, and even among various social classes.

For example, Plaxo is the network with the most users over the age of 65. Facebook is more popular with women, but Digg and Reddit tend to be more popular with men. LinkedIn is the “richest” social network, but Plurk outranks it when it comes to well-educated users who have graduate degrees.

They have a ton of traffic data to work with, and this infographic does a good job of summarizing some of the key findings at the top level. 

Found on Mashable and Social Media Graphics

Thursday
Feb102011

2010 Facebook vs. Twitter Social Demographics

Facebook vs. Twitter is a good one from DigitalSurgeons.com.  They’ve done a great job of compiling the data from at least 10 different sources, to create an overall profile of the standard Facebook and Twitter users.

One has over 500 million users, the other just over 100 million. But who are they and what’s their behavior? What’s their value to a brand? How old are they? What’s their education? How much do they make? Just exactly what does the Facebook vs. Twitter landscape look like? Good questions. Here’s how we see it.

The use of the Polar Area Chart (also called a Nightingale Rose Diagram) does a good job of breaking down the demographic information into 11 different categories.  Unlike a standard pie chart, each slice is the same angle, and only the radius of each slice conveys value.

The difficulty in using this visualization style, is that it’s hard for the reader to compare between the two diagrams.  Does Twitter or Facebook have more logins by mobile device?  The reader can’t tell from the visuals, and they have to move back and forth reading the values to tell the difference.

One possible alternative would have been to put everything into one Polar Area Chart, so for every section the Facebook slice is next to the Twitter slice.  That way you could visually compare the two without reading the numbers or comparing between two charts.

Thanks Matt for sending in the link!