About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Monday
Mar152010

The FedEx Universe

Revised Infographic

Robin Richards (ripetungi) created this infographic about the FedEx Universe for MeetTheBoss.com.  The version above is slightly modified to correct the size of some of the bubbles, add some mind-map style connection lines and add some photo images.

 

Created for MeetTheBoss.tv, it is a celebration of Fedex as a company and its size.  Working thought creating this, I was amazed at the huge numbers involved in running a global company and getting packages around the earth.  This is what I have tried to show.

I have updated this infographic.  I received some great feedback from Randy Krum over at Coolinfographics.com (Great Site) and on reflection decided that it could be improved with greater use of the bubble mind map graphics.  So that is what I have done.  Also added some more eye candy with images inside of the main bubble totals. Let me know what any thoughts on the old vs the new.

 

You can see the original version below, and Robin has posted some comment about creating it on his blog, ripetungi.com.  There’s a lesson here for infographic designers everywhere; the viewer sees the area of objects as representative of scale.  So in the original version, the diameter of the bubbles changed with the value, but in the corrected version, the area of the bubbles changes.  When the diameter increased by 2x, that meant that the area increased by 3.5x and the bubbles didn’t accurately represent the values.

Also worth noting that Robin created this infographic in ONE day.  Great work under tight timelines!


Original Version

Friday
Mar122010

Heat: A Visual Tour of What's Hot

 

Our friend, Jess Bachman from WallStats.com, created Heat: A Visual Tour of What’s Hot or Not in the Universe for Rasmussen College.  This fun infographic lines up real-life examples across the entire scale of temperature.

I really like this one, its fun.  Basically it a huge ordered list of temperatures.  Sometimes it just helps to see everything all in one go, to add some perspective.  Also there are cool factoids and such scattered about.  To support my work please digg it and tweet it or otherwise spread the good word!  Thanks y’all.


 

There are a few humorous entries included in the scale, like the melting point of ice cream at 5°F.  The entire infographic can be seen on the Rasmussen College website.  You can see Jess’ own comments on his blog.

 

Nice job Jess!

Thursday
Mar112010

Underskin: The Human Subway Map

Sam Loman has taken the subway map infographic style to the human body.  Underskin is an infographic that traces the routes of eight different systems within the body (Digestive, Respiratory, Arterial, etc.), and highlights the major connection points.

You can see Sam’s work on just-sam.com, but the image there is low resolution.  She sent me the image above so you could see the high-resolution details.  Thanks Sam!

Found on VizWorld and Information Aesthetics.

Wednesday
Mar102010

What Do You Suggest? A Visual Search Interface

Using a mindmap-style visual interface, WhatDoYouSuggest.com shows you the search results from Google in an easy-to-use interface.  Created by Simon Elvery, the interface returns the top words that Google suggests based on your initial query.  By clicking on the relevant words, the search becomes more relevant, and more words are suggested to narrow your search.

Both the order of words and the thickness of the lines are meaningful.  More detailed information is available on the Simon’s blog.

 

What Do You Suggest takes a seed from you (or gives you something random) then guides you on a journey through language and the collective lives of Google users.

Using data from Google to make suggetions on where you might like to go next, What Do You Suggest is an experimental and interactive environment designed to explore how we use language and search on the internet.

  • The words that appear first in each set of options are the words Google thinks are most likely to be what people are looking for.
  • The words joined by the thickest lines are ones which will produce the most results if you searched for them on Google.

 

Of course, I had try see what “infographics” cam up with…

Found on Information Aesthetics and Gizmodo.

 

Tuesday
Mar092010

BBC Budget Treemap Infographic

David McCandless, from Information Is Beautiful created this treemap of selected highlights from the BBC budget for the Guardian Datablog.

Recent controversy about the budget of the BBC here in the UK made me curious about its spending. Here’s the BBC-o-Gram, a visualization I created for the Guardian Datablog, exploring the costs of running one of the biggest broadcasters in the world.

David has also posted the underlying data in a GoogleDocs spreadsheet.

Tuesday
Mar092010

The Writing on the Wall

From an article in New Scientist titled “The writing on the cave wall”, this infographic shows that many symbols and figures used in cave-wall paintings have similar forms.

What emerged was startling: 26 signs, all drawn in the same style, appeared again and again at numerous sites (see illustration). Admittedly, some of the symbols are pretty basic, like straight lines, circles and triangles, but the fact that many of the more complex designs also appeared in several places hinted to von Petzinger and Nowell that they were meaningful - perhaps even the seeds of written communication.

A group of 26 symbols crops up at Stone Age sites throughout the world – are these the origin of the written word?

Found on Chart Porn

Friday
Feb262010

The History of Olympic Pictograms [video]

 

NYTimes.com posted this video by designer Steven Heller called “Olympic Pictograms Through the Ages”.  You may not agree with Steven’s opinions on which icons were better than others, but it is fascinating that every city for every olympics has tried to redesign the icons to add their own visual personality (with the exception of Montreal in 1976 that reused the icons from 1972).

Designer Steven Heller traces the evolution of the tiny symbols for each Olympic sport since their appearance in 1936.

 

Found on FlowingData and VizWorld

Wednesday
Feb242010

NASA's budget timeline [infographic]

 

Another great timeline of NASA’s budget every year from 1958 through 2015 in Obama’s new budget proposal that cuts NASA funding.  This one designed by Robin Richards (ripetungi) for an article in U.S. Infrastructure magazine.

Looking at every budget throughout the history of NASA, comparing this with its space missions for that year.

You can see Robin’s site and follow him on Twitter.

Friday
Feb192010

NASA's New Budget [infographic]

GOOD has a good timeline of NASA’s budget over the last 50 years.

The Obama administration announced a new budget for NASA, which despite a nominal increase, cuts future programs and the prospect of more space exploration. This is a look at NASA’s budget over time, and the major missions it accomplished with that budget.

A collaboration between GOOD and 
Karlssonwilker.

Although, since the timeline wraps like text to keep it on one page, I think the bars that represent the different programs should stay in the same order.  And what’s with the flashing images when you view the large infographic?

Friday
Feb192010

Emily Schwartzman Wins Haiti Infographic Contest!

Emily Schwartzman has won the GOOD contest to design an infographic about the earthquake impact to Haiti.  A high-resolution version is available on the GOOD site.

We’re proud to announce the winner of our latest infographic contest, where we asked readers to design an infographic about the recent earthquake in Haiti. We at GOOD conferred with Aaron Perry-Zucker of Design for Haiti, and we’ve come to a decision.

Emily Schwartzman—whose graphic, “Aftermath of the Haiti Earthquake,” clearly and concisely depicts both the human toll of the earthquake and the scope of the earthquake itself—is our winner. Schwartzman will take home our prize package, including a GOOD T-shirt and a free subscription. You’ll be able to see her infographic in print in our next issue as well as on the Design for Haiti site.

Excellent job Emily!