About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Thursday
Apr012010

Overpriced HDMI cables

Overpriced HDMI Cables was created by our friend Jess Bachman at WallStats.com.  This infographic shows the history and reasoning behind high-priced HDMI cables and why you should avoid them.

 

If you’ve already splashed out on the huge flat-screen tv, a state-of-art Blu-Ray player, and a satellite dish with a monthly subscription that brings with it hundreds of channels, then it probably seems like it’s a small price to pay for HDMI cables. But, this is exactly the mentality that gets people to pay for this habitually over-priced bit of technological excess. The truth, as our infographic points out, is that there is absolutely no difference between the cheapest and most expensive HDMI cables, at least over shorter runs. If you’re wiring an entire house, you may find these cables to be worth it.

To understand why you shouldn’t pay extra, you need to understand the difference between analog and digital. With analog cables, the signal degrades, with digital cables such as HDMI, it either works or it doesn’t. The signal doesn’t degrade any more than your JPEGs degrade when you put them on a thumb drive.


 

 

Wednesday
Mar312010

What's In MyBag?  [photos]

 

Chris Watson, from Visual Think Map, started a new network on Ning called “What’s In MyBag” for anyone to share photos of all the stuff they carry in their briefcase or bag.  It’s a fun, visual project that can share a lot of information within only one photo.

Join and share your own photo!

Wednesday
Mar312010

The World Christianity Maps

From FloatingSheep.com, this is the Christianity Map that maps the volume of searches related to the different branches of Christianity across the globe.  The great cartographers from Floating Sheep published three maps showing the world, the U.S. and Europe.

…discovered patterns that are incredibly clear. Catholics are most visible in much of the Northeast and Canada, with Lutherans taking the Midwest, Baptists the Southeast, and Mormons unsurprisingly taking much of the mountain states. Methodists, interestingly, seem to primarily be most visible in a thin red line between the Southern Baptists and everyone else.

Taking a closer look at Europe, there is a fascinating split between Orthodox Eastern Europe, Protestant Germany, and Catholic everywhere else. In places such as the UK that contain more Protestants than Catholics it is likely that people aren’t using the actual term “Protestant” as a signifier of their religion.

These are a more detailed look specifically at Christianity after some of their earlier work on the Google Geographies of Religion that look at searches for the different figures of religion across the globe.

Found on the GOOD Blog and The Atlantic.

Tuesday
Mar302010

The Nerd Venn Diagram

Yep…I’m a geek.

From Matthew Mason on his blog, sed contra.

 

Thanks to Ken (LibertySquare} on TGM for the link!

Monday
Mar292010

How To Improve Your Credit Score (infographic)

Using the format of a board game, How To Improve Your Credit Score is an easy-to-read infographic from YourWealthPuzzle.com.

“Pay on time, wipe out debt, raise credit score.”

Thanks Dave for the link!

Monday
Mar292010

Online Dating Is Bigger Than Porn [Infographic]

Online Dating Is Bigger Than Porn Infographic

New infographic, Ever Gotten A Date Online?, from OnlineSchools.org examining some of the data behind online dating.  As Mashable points out, one of the most surprising statistics is that the online dating industry is larger than the porn industry.

From Jennifer Van Grove at Mashable: Per the graphic — which pulls data from a number of sources, including Reuters and The Washington Post — online dating is worth more than one billion dollars per year, with the mobile phone dating market worth $550 million.

Found on Mashable via @hessiej on Twitter

Friday
Mar262010

Japan - The Strange Country [infographic video]

Japan-The Strange Country (English ver.) from Kenichi on Vimeo.

Created by Kenichi Tanaka for his final thesis project, Japan - The Strange Conutry is an infographic video exploring the statistics about Japan and the Japanese people. Available in both English and Japanese language versions.

You can see Kenichi’s work on his design website or his blog.



Thanks to mobarts for the link!

Friday
Mar262010

The Best Small Cities to Buy A House (Infographic)

Fixr.com posted this infographic on their blog yesterday showing the statistics behinds the top 10 Best Small Cities to Buy A House in America.  I like the format of a larger infographic that combines a few different styles into one comprehensive image.  Combing map data, stylized bar charts and informative lists into one, easy-to-read infographic.

Imagine living in a small town where people are relaxed and friendly, no traffic jams, clean air, great education, fun leisure and culture, high salaries, and much more. We want to illustrate the top 10 small cities to live in the U.S taking into consideration such factors.

Thanks Andres for the link, and the chance to provide some input.  Nice job!

Thursday
Mar252010

What Does Your Email Provider Say About You? [infographic]

From CreditKarma.com, apparently, the email provider you use can imply certain things about your personal financial position to the world.

You may have kept your AOL account since receiving a free disc in the 90’s, signed up for Yahoo! in college, got a Gmail invite, or moved to Comcast when you finally installed broadband, but what does it say about you? When categorized by email provider, the credit score and debt averages of users begins to tell a story. Do Gmail users take on larger mortgages? Do Yahoo! users have lower credit card limits? Credit Karma takes a closer look at how users of the most popular email providers stack up.

Found on FlowingData

Monday
Mar152010

The FedEx Universe

Revised Infographic

Robin Richards (ripetungi) created this infographic about the FedEx Universe for MeetTheBoss.com.  The version above is slightly modified to correct the size of some of the bubbles, add some mind-map style connection lines and add some photo images.

 

Created for MeetTheBoss.tv, it is a celebration of Fedex as a company and its size.  Working thought creating this, I was amazed at the huge numbers involved in running a global company and getting packages around the earth.  This is what I have tried to show.

I have updated this infographic.  I received some great feedback from Randy Krum over at Coolinfographics.com (Great Site) and on reflection decided that it could be improved with greater use of the bubble mind map graphics.  So that is what I have done.  Also added some more eye candy with images inside of the main bubble totals. Let me know what any thoughts on the old vs the new.

 

You can see the original version below, and Robin has posted some comment about creating it on his blog, ripetungi.com.  There’s a lesson here for infographic designers everywhere; the viewer sees the area of objects as representative of scale.  So in the original version, the diameter of the bubbles changed with the value, but in the corrected version, the area of the bubbles changes.  When the diameter increased by 2x, that meant that the area increased by 3.5x and the bubbles didn’t accurately represent the values.

Also worth noting that Robin created this infographic in ONE day.  Great work under tight timelines!


Original Version