Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum
President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization and Infographic Design

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

DFW DataViz Meetup
NEXT EVENT: September 6, 2016

Join the DFW Data Visualization and Infographics Meetup Group if you're in the Dallas/Fort Worth area!

Search the Cool Infographics site

Custom Search




The Cool Infographics® Gallery:

How to add the
Cool Infographics button to your:

Cool Infographics iOS icon

- iPhone
- iPad
- iPod Touch


Read on Flipboard for iPad and iPhone

Featured in the Tech & Science category

Flipboard icon

Twitter Feed
From the Bookstore

Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic


Fuel Poverty with the Over-60 Crowd in England

Click for larger image

EDITED by request of the source:

From Blueclawsearch.co.uk, a great use of infographics in your marketing strategy is in coordination with a press release to help communicate a message to your audience. 

The press release was of course sent out to the normal sources, but the infographic can have a life of its own.  The infographic has the additional ability to reach their audience directly, and be shared on the Internet in ways that a press release never would.

Here’s the press release that went out in conjunction with the infographic:

PRESS RELEASE for immediate release

DATE: 3rd February 2011

Blueclaw Highlights Study on Fuel Poverty Amongst Over 60s in England

This infographic created with the intention of providing a visual impact of how the elderly over 60s are coping in the freezing winter months. These figures are from a recent study on fuel poverty and the over 60s in England*.

Fuel poverty is a real and rising problem in England - 4.6 million people aged over 60 are worried about being to afford heating bills. Furthermore, 1 in 3 over 60’s had to resort to drastic measures to fend off the cold, such as going to a public library. Also according to the study, winter deaths between 2009 and 2010 have totalled more than 23,000.

Too many times and too often, statistics and data from important studies are ignored not because the findings are not urgent, but because most people find it hard to process numbers and jargon easily. AgeUK has recently done a study on how fuel poverty is affecting the over 60s in the UK. This infographic was designed by Blueclaw, to create a visual impact of the study. This social awareness campaign coincides with Fuel Poverty Awareness Day (11th February), a national awareness-raising media and public affairs campaign with an aim to urge MPs to focus their surgeries that week, on helping those who are in or at risk of fuel poverty.

*Study taken from: http://www.ageuk.org.uk/latest-press/archive/poorest-over-60s-twice-as-likely-to-dread-the-cold-as-the-richest-says-age-uk/
More info on Fuel Poverty Awareness Day: http://www.nea.org.uk/fuel-poverty-awareness-day-2011/

I do have a couple issues with the infographic design itself.  Why are the squares that are “2X and 3X as likely” the same size?  Why is 1/3” represented in a solid circle (looks like a pie chart, so it should show a 1/3 slice)?  The grid of 17 houses representing 1.7 million is 6 houses across, which is hard for most readers to comprehend.  We live in a base-10 world, so the grid should be 5 houses wide.


Google's Periodic Table of APIs & Developer Tools

From the Google Code site, the Periodic Table of Google APIs & Developer Tools is a cool layout of the tools available.  It’s actually well designed table, so each element is clickable, and takes you to the information page about that particular API.

They’re color-coded by category, but many of them belong to multiple categories.  For example, the Google Analytics is part of Data APIs, Ads and Tools.  If you mouse over the category names at the top, all of the members of that category are highlighted below.

Found on Twitter through @illuminantceo


InMaps: Viewing Your Business Network

The new LinkedIN Maps is a very cool interactive infographic that visualizes your own LinkedIN network.  The InMaps pull data from your own LinkedIN profile when you allow access, so you can only see your own network.  

The connections are grouped into clusters based on shared connections and companies.  You can see above that my network has a few clearly defined clusters, but then a large blue area that has no clear cluster information.  You can also learn about you network with some of the visual data built into the map.  People with bigger dots and their names in larger fonts have more connections.

It’s interactive, so you can zoom in to see the individual names, and if you click on a connection, it highlights all of their connections as well.

Check out the quick, descriptive video from LinkedIn’s chief scientist DJ Patil:


For some reason, it doesn’t show every connection between people.  There are a few people in my network that I know are also connected to each other; however, the map didn’t show any connection between them.  Not sure what’s going behind the scenes.

You can publicly share your map on Twitter, Facebook and of course LinkedIN when you click the share buttons.  Here’s mine.  This creates a static image with a legend if you have named your color-coded clusters.  Clicking on the map takes readers to the front page to create their own, but clicking on your name takes them to your LinkedIN profile page.

You can also see some other anonymous maps on the front page by clicking on the “Next Map” button which will change to the background map image.

This one has been popular.  Found on FlowingDataVizWorld, Infosthetics and Mashable.


Horoscoped: Visualizing Our Common Future

Horoscoped is another cool infographic project from Information Is Beautiful.  Scraping the text from over 22,000 horoscopes, a word cloud is created separately for each sign.  This visually shows you how common the words used truly are.

As part of their transparency, the team has also done a fantastic job of providing a description of their entire process and links to all of the data and the scripts here and here.

Taking the most common words from all of the horoscopes, they have created the Grand Unifying Horoscope:








Found on Bad Astronomy and Chart Porn.


Small Business: By The Numbers

Intuit brings us By The Numbers: Small Business in the U.S. and Abroad.  I like the mix of 2D and 3D visuals, but the visuals at the bottom seem odd.  Showing different statistics for a handful of countries instead of comparing the same statistics across countries makes that part harder to understand.  I would guess that was dependent on what data was available for the different countries.

Inflation and currency exchange play large factors in the cost to start-up a new business abroad compared with the United States. If you’re considering starting up a small business, the below infographic breaks down start-up costs, ease of business and success rates broken down by country, as well as a view of small business around the globe.

I appreciate that they cite their sources, but I wish I could give credit to the designer, who isn’t listed on the infographic.

As a small business owner myself, I hope I fall on the good side of the survival statistics!

Thanks for sendng the link Rachael!


The Illusion of Diversity: Visualizing the Soft Drink Industry


Very cool visualization from Philip H. Howard at Michigan State University called The Illusion of Diversity.  It’s fairly big and hard to read, so I dropped the image link into Zoom.it to create the zoomable image above.  You can see the high-resolution image here, or download the high-resolution PDF here.

Three firms control 89% of US soft drink sales [1]. This dominance is obscured from us by the appearance of numerous choices on retailer shelves. Steve Hannaford refers to this as “pseudovariety,” or the illusion of diversity, concealing a lack of real choice [2]. To visualize the extent of pseudovariety in this industry we developed a cluster diagram to represent the number of soft drink brands and varieties found in the refrigerator cases of 94 Michigan retailers, along with their ownership and/or licensing connections.

Professor Howard’s team did a lot of legwork visiting stores to gather the data, recording 987 different varieties of soft drinks from 94 food retailers in the Lansing, Michigan area.


The statement “Three firms control 89% of US soft drink sales” really means that “89% of the drinks available come from only three firms”.  The distinction is subtle, but there is no sales data included.  This is just an ownership structure.

You also have pay attention to what you’re seeing.  The bubble sizes are mixed because the parent company bubbles are sized to the portion of drinks they control, but the size of the individual drink bubbles is consistent and doesn’t convey any meaning.  For the individual drink, the color-coding is what conveys meaning.

The illusion of diversity in the soft drink industry extends beyond obscuring ownership, as its products are primarily water and sweeteners. More research is needed on the links between pseudovariety and the consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor substances.

I noticed that this was created using OmniGraffle, which is a vector mapping application that I use a lot.

Found on Infosthetics.com and VizWolrd.com 


Client Infographic: An Illustrated View of SAP SPS 18 


The SPS 18 Fact Sheet is a new infographic InfoNewt (my company) designed recently for Panaya, a software-as-a-service company that provides upgrade automation to SAP customers.  The team at Panaya has some fantastic, proprietary data and needed a way to share that information with current and future customers.

It’s mind-boggling that the SAP Enterprise software is so big that the last round of updates had 13,349 notes/changes!  I can totally understand the need for Panaya’s simulations and analysis for IT managers trying to manage implementing these updates.  Panaya has a fantastic service that can evaluate the impact of each update package (support package stack) for their clients’ unique and different installations of SAP.

Every company uses (or doesn’t use) the SAP modules differently and knowing which modules have the most notes/changes can make a big difference on how you implement each update.  

SAP Support Package Stacks Have Never Looked so Sexy – An Illustrated View of SPS 18

SAP Support Package Stacks are “mega bundles” of software updates that SAP periodically makes available. These updates include important bug fixes, performance improvements, and legal changes such as labor and tax law changes. The challenge is that most stacks include well over 10,000 changes or “Notes.” And these changes can impact installations in ways that are hard to predict, with possible adverse effect on business processes.

One of the advantages of running a SaaS solution here at Panaya is that we can run aggregate analysis across hundreds of projects. Think “Google Trends” for SAP Support Package Stacks. We ran our simulation over hundreds of different instances to determine the typical impact areas and other stats. The goal is to help you plan towards your implementations.

We sent an early version to several thousands of reviewers and got great feedback.

As a next step, we partnered with designer Randy Krum, who, believe it or not, is not only a talented artist, but also a former SAP BPX-er. So he can actually pronounce ABAP and can tell BI from FI.

So without further ado, here’s SAP Support Pack 18 like you have never seen it before

Thanks to Udi and the rest of the team at Panaya!  There’s much more information available at Panayainc.com and ERP Executive: The Magazine for SAP Managers.


The X-Men Family Tree #infographic


Joe Stone just posted his design of the X-Men Family Tree.  Connection lines styles and colors reveal the type of relationship.  Silhouettes or minimal illustrations give the reader just enough visual cues to identify each of the mutants.  How many can you identify?

A little Illustrator-drawn infographic I’ve been playing around with. I probably could have included more characters, but I had to draw the line somewhere.

Joe has also made a high-resolution version available for anyone that wants to print it out!  Thanks Joe!


The Sequel Map - Is Part II Ever Better than the Original?


The Sequel Map, from BoxOfficeQuant.com is a cool chart of movie sequels showing how they compared to the original.  The location is based on the RottenTomatoes.com scores of the original and the sequel being plotted.  If the scores are the same, the movie would be exactly on the line, and any sequel with a score higher than the original is above the line.  The sizes of the bubbles represent the total box office receipts.

As evidence, all sequels with Rotten Tomatoes scores have been categorized below, with the originals’ scores on the X-axis, and the sequels’ scores on the Y. Films at the center line are sequels with the exact rating as the original; films above are sequels that have surpassed the original; films below, ones that fared worse.

Notes: Categorization of sequels is sometimes more art than science, so I’ve had to follow a few rules: I’ve only included the second film in any series, never third or following films. I haven’t included remakes or “reboots,” and I’m only presenting films which opened (at some time) in the US and have Rotten Tomatoes ratings.

And finally, it’s worth noting that the only two film/sequel combos to both score 100%, are the first two Toy Storys and the French films Jean de Florette / Manon des Sources.

Rotten Tomatoes ratings from RottenTomatoes.com. US Gross from www.the-numbers.com

I especially like turning the chart 45°, which puts the best score possible for a sequel to improve on the original at the top center of the chart.  If both the original and the sequel scored high, the bubbles are located towards the right instead of the top.  I’ve done this with a number of 2x2 quadrant charts for clients.

So, according to the chart, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan was the best sequel improvement over the original, and I would have to agree.

I’d love to see a version that plots the box office receipts on the X and Y axes so that it would show the instances where the sequel made more money than the original.  You could see more of the financial incentive behind making sequels, even if they’re generally rated lower than the original.

Found on VizWorld.com


Should I Work for Free? - a flowchart

Should I Work for Free? is a great decision tree flowchart from Jessica Hische.  Start in the middle and work your way out.  

I made this flowchart for my future students but I think it’s useful for pretty much any creative, myself included. Prints to come!

I’ve heard some of these rationales before…

Thanks for the link Erica!