About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Monday
Feb012010

Mindmap of Randy Pausch's Last Lecture

Mike Krsticevic has created a great mindmap based on Randy Pausch’s Last Lecture.  

At the age of only 45 (in Sept 2006), Professor Pausch was told that only 4% of pancreatic cancer sufferers (of which he was now diagnosed as one) lived for 5 years after their diagnosis. At the time of the “Last Lecture”, due to his deteriorating medical condition, Professor Pausch was told his odds had reduced to 3 to 6 months of good health left (at best). 

I have spent 3 hours preparing the mind map for you (including the time spent re-watching the video) and I have learnt so much more by being actively involved. For this reason I strongly recommend that you take the time to read and study the mind map after you watch the video. I believe it will be well worth your time

If you haven’t seen this video, I highly recommend watching this.  It’s about 1:15 long, so watch it over lunch or when you have enough time, but it is truly inspirational.

You can download the PDF from Mike’s site.

Sunday
Jan312010

Infographic Contest from GOOD Magazine!

A new infographic contest from GOOD Magazine.  Design an infographic looking at the scope and aid given in relation to the earthquake in Haiti.  Deadline is February 9th.  See the GOOD site for complete details and inspiration!

the OBJECTIVE
Highlight the scope of the Haiti earthquake, as well as the aid given to help recover from the disaster.

the ASSIGNMENT
Create an infographic that explores some or all of the following: the toll of the earthquake, why the earthquake was so devastating, the recovery efforts, and the world’s donations of money and aid. We’re offering this contest in collaboration with 
Design for Haiti (a new site by Aaron Perry-Zucker, the man behind Design for Obama and the accompanying bookDesign for Obama—Posters for Change: A Grassroots Anthology), which is collecting information graphics about Haiti. The judging will be done by Perry-Zucker and the editors of GOOD.

the REQUIREMENTS
Send us an e-mail at projects[at]goodinc[dot]com with your infographic or post it to 
GOOD’s Community Blog with the tag “February 2010 Transparency Contest.” It can be in any image format, but it should be high enough resolution that it can be printed at 300 dpi. Make sure to include your sources, and a brief (one- or two-sentence) introduction to your concept. We’ll take submissions now through February 9. The winning entry will be announced on February 16, featured on our homepage and on the Design for Haiti site, and printed in the next issue of GOOD. We’ll send a GOOD T-shirt and a free subscription (or gift subscription) to the winner.

Thanks Tina for the link!

Thursday
Jan282010

How Will You Manage? [video]

Loaded with labor statistics, How Will You Manage? is a new infographic video put together by XPLANE for Kronos Workforce Management.  Using a mix of statistics, illustrations and some infographics the video does a good job of looking at our changing workforce, and the challenges faced by both companies and employees.

Both teams conducted research for the video’s content, and XPLANE developed a forward-thinking storyline that exuded personality and brought the message to life. XPLANE also leveraged existing Kronos visual style and color palette to ensure brand consistency. Created with Apple’s Keynote software, the five-minute video uses simple visuals, text and music to depict the changing state of today’s workforces and what that means for employers. 

Xplane has posted a brief case study description of the process they went through with Kronos to develop the video under a very tight timeline to prepare for the Kronos User Conference.  I love that they made this with Apple Keynote!

 

Thursday
Jan282010

Circular Browser Statistics using Axiis

Michael VanDaniker posted this Historical Browser Statistics visual as part of the launch of Axiis, including the detail about what it took to develop this visual.  At its root, this is a timeline that starts at the center (January 2002) and works outward to the outer ring that represents the most recent time slice (August 2009).  Each ring is a stacked bar showing the portion of browser usage.

Each of the concentric rings are essentially pie charts showing the percentage of visitors using each browser for a particular time slice, starting with January 2002 in the center and working out to August 2009.  The numbers on W3schools.com don’t quite add up to 100% because they don’t report on browsers that make up less than 0.5% of their visitors.  This results in a gap at the end of each ring.

I don’t know much about Axiis (yet…), but its a new, open source framework for data visualizations.

Thanks to Les (@lesjames on Twitter) for the link!

Tuesday
Jan262010

Caffeine and Calories

Check out another great caffeine infographic, The Buzz vs. The Bulge, by David McCandless from Information Is Beautiful.  Another great spin on caffeine in drinks, this one plots caffeine content on the X-Axis, and calories on Y-Axis.

I love that there are also some foods mixed in with the drinks like a dark chocolate car, a butter croissant and coffee ice cream (brilliant).

When I started working on my Caffeine Poster, this hadn’t come out yet.  One the reasons I choose caffeine as the data to visualize for my project was because there weren’t any good visuals to be found at that time.  I definitely wanted to acknowledge David’s great work.

Monday
Jan252010

Photos of The Caffeine Poster


I tried out the poster printing service from PosterBrain.com last week and printed out a couple copies of The Caffeine Poster.  I’ve never posted the full, high-resolution image online, but I used it with PosterBrain to print it out fullsize 24” x 36”. (Apologies for my not-quite-professional photos)

 

The poster is gorgeous!  I’m so impressed by the PosterBrain service, and the quality of their prints.

 

You really should try their service.  I uploaded the file on Sunday, and paid only $24.99 each to have them printed with free shipping.  I received the posters on Friday by standard USPS mail.  They were beautifully packaged with sheets of tissue separating the posters.

 

 

Monday
Jan252010

Making-Of The Caffeine Poster - Part 3

 

How did you pick which drinks to include?

The original spreadsheet with the caffeine calculations had about 100 drinks on it, but that made the image WAY too crowded.  Looking back, I could have made the images smaller to fit more drinks onto the poster, so maybe the next version will have more.

For the coffee side, I picked some of the most widely available coffee shops, and I also only picked one drink from each.  Starbucks alone had 20-30 different drinks I could have listed.

For the drinks side, I picked the drinks that were most widely available at the grocery stores in the DFW area.  It may be different regionally, but the local region was all I had to work with.

 

Dude, where’s the TEA?!?

I posted this in the comments, but I know I left tea out of the graphic (along with thousands of other drinks). It was actually hard to cull down the wide assortment of drinks down to only the ones I included. Not a tea drinker myself, tea didn’t make the cut (Kevin Rose would be disappointed, I know).  It’s very crowded in the under 100mg space, so tea didn’t make the cut.  Based on the feedback I got, I’ll include it if a next versions happens.

FWIW, tea averages between 40-70mg of caffeine in each 8oz cup

 

Can I buy a copy of The Caffeine Poster?

I haven’t setup the poster for sale, but I did keep the high-resolution images offline so I could make it available if there was interest.  The images on Flickr are certainly high-resolution enough to read the details, but they won’t print very nicely as a 24” x 36” poster.  So far, I haven’t heard from many people who wanted to buy a copy.

I also got some feedback that The Caffeine Poster makes a good infographic, but maybe not a great poster.  To be a great poster, it probably need more details and other additional information to make the viewer curious to step closer and read more.

However, I did have a few copies printed for myself…of course.

 

Will there be a next version?

Probably.  I’ve got some other projects in the works, so there’s no telling how long it will take.  You suggestions on what to change or add are very welcome.

 

 

The is the end of the Making-Of posts.  I got so many questions about the behind-the-scenes stuff that I moved all of The Caffeine Poster posts together on a separate page.  Check out the Caffeine Poster link at the top of the page.

Friday
Jan222010

Subway Map of the Milky Way Galaxy

In the Milky Way Transit Authority, Samuel Arbesman has taken the subway map infographic style and applied it to the Milky Way, using stars and nebula as the station points.  The lines do correlate to the spiral arms of the galaxy.

Each line on the map corresponds to an arm of the galaxy, and the ‘stations’ are places in their actual locations, albeit stars, nebula and other astronomical objects.  The inspiration for the schematic representation came after he re-read Carl Sagan’s novel ‘Contact’, which alludes to a cosmic Grand Central Station.  The idea drew him to analyse the first modern subway map, London’s Tube map, which was designed by Harry Beck.

Found on digg.com

Friday
Jan222010

What Causes Jet Lag? (Infographic)

 

Matt Kursmark designed this infographic series about circadian rhythms and What Causes Jet Lag as an assignment in his information graphics class at Ohio State University.

These panels are the result of my third year information graphics class. The assignment was to choose any sequence, cycle, or evolution and represent it graphically. The information was to be presented in two separate panels that were related but could also function independently of one another.  On the first panel, I chose to represent the circadian rhythm cycle and how they normally work. On the second panel, I presented how circadian rhythms can get off track due to long-distance travel, aka jet lag. 

 

 

Matt is now freelancing in Cincinnati, OH.  Nice work Matt!

Thursday
Jan212010

Don't Flush Your Credit Down the Drain (infographic)

Don’t Flush Your Credit Down the Drain is a new graphic designed for SpendOnLife.com.  Using the metaphor of “flushing your credit down the drain” the graphic explains what happens when your credit score drops to different levels.

Ever tempted to just stop paying your credit card bills? I mean, what’s the worst that could really happen? We created our latest infographic to explain how your creditors might retaliate if you stop sending them money each month. (Hint: the pipes get rustier and the rats get uglier the further down you go.) Don’t let this happen to you! 

This image straddles the line between illustration and infographic.  The illustration doesn’t convey much data other than the farther down you go, the lower you credit score becomes.  The pipes get rustier and it’s much darker on the bottom.  These visual cues let you know that lower scores are just plain “bad”. 

I think the rats are a nice touch.

Thanks to Ashley for the link!