Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

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Food Poisoning Outbreaks Digested

Food Poisoning Outbreaks Digested infographic

The Food Poisoning Outbreaks Digested infographic is the static graphic winner for the Food Poisoning challenge put on by Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards. Designed by Andrew Park, the infographic ranks the number of food outbreaks within different categories like specific cuisine or the toxin/pathogen. 

Using a Sankey diagram, the visualisation charts the percentage breakdown for food poisoning outbreaks by national cuisine, food type, pathogen/toxin and contributing factor where the cuisine type was known.

The diagram concludes with the “most lethal combination”, highlighting the top factors that led to an outbreak.

I thought it would add context to frame the Sankey diagram in a human body, as though it was being eaten and spreading through the body like a disease.

I really like this approach to a Sankey Diagram that breaks the original total into four different categories of data.


Mobile Phone Size Evolution

Mobile Phone Size Evolution

Great data visualization of the Evolution of Mobile Phone Sizes on the Future Trends page from 3 Danmark!

Simple, easy to understand.

Infographic and data visualization images are often shared without any links or accompanying text, so online images like this need to include some additional text with the source publishing and a URL in the image file itself.


Avengers Comic Book Cover Colors Data Visualization

Avengers Comic Book Cover Colors Data Visualization

Jon Keegan at the Wall Street Journal has created a fascinating interactive data visualization of the last 50 Years of ‘Avengers’ Comic Book Covers Through Color

When Marvel’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron” opens in theaters next month, a familiar set of iconic colors will be splashed across movie screens world-wide: The gamma ray-induced green of the Hulk, Iron Man’s red and gold armor, and Captain America’s red, white and blue uniform.

How the Avengers look today differs significantly from their appearance in classic comic-book versions, thanks to advancements in technology and a shift to a more cinematic aesthetic. As Marvel’s characters started to appear in big-budget superhero films such as “X-Men” in 2000, the darker, muted colors of the movies began to creep into the look of the comics. Explore this shift in color palettes and browse more than 50 years of “Avengers” cover artwork below. Read more about this shift in color.

Each cover illustration is broken down into its own color band that displays the amount of each color used.

The data visualization is a fantastic display of how the color use has changed over the last 50 years. The left column has the full waterfall of colors, and the center column displays the color breakdown of each specific color. You can see each cover illustration by hovering over any specific color band.

Here’s the whole 50+ years in the full color waterfall. I can see the overall trend has moved to darker colors and more black in the cover illustrations.



Flight Patterns Deconstructed

Flight Patterns Deconstructed Animated Infographic

Flight Videos Deconstructed is a fantastic animated infographic design by Eleanor Lutz at TabletopWhale. Eleanor is a designer from Seattle and has a Bachelor's in molecular biology from the University of Washington. She used to work in a research lab teaching mosquitoes to fly through mazes.

This week's post isn't entirely scientific, but I thought I'd upload it anyway since it's related to animals and patterns in nature.

When I worked in an insect lab as an undergrad, I helped out with an experiment about mosquito larvae. As part of the process we used a Matlab program to manually input the larva's location during thousands of video frames.

It was a fun experiment, and I wanted to make something similar from Youtube videos. I found slow-motion videos of five flying species, and mapped out specific points on the wings during one wingbeat. I ended up with 15 frames per wingbeat, and I connected every frame using imaginary curves that went through all of the 15 mapped points.

Of course, 15 frames isn't nearly enough for any kind of factual conclusion, so this week's post is just an art exercise. But hopefully you can enjoy this as an artistic pattern based on real life :)

Animated infographics distributed as animated GIF image files are making a resurgence, and I believe it's because they are easier to share online than videos or embed code for javascript animations. They work best when the animation adds valuable context and aids the audience to better understand the information.

The design is also available as a printed poster that shows the flight patterns by breaking out the wing motion into multiple images.

I had the pleasure to meet Eleanor in March at the Malofiej Infographics World Summit in Spain, where her design won a Silver medal in the online design category. The design work she is doing is amazing, and her talk on animated infographics was one of the highlights of the conference.


Your Life in Weeks

Your Life in Weeks infographic is the life of a typical American broken down into the 52 weeks within each year. This infographic was created by Tim Urban from Wait But Why. Each dot represents one week of your life. The infographic highlights some of the major milestones in life, while color coding the weeks into the big categories of schooling, career, and retirement.

Each row of weeks makes up one year. That’s how many weeks it takes to turn a newborn into a 90-year-old.

It kind of feels like our lives are made up of a countless number of weeks. But there they are — fully countable — staring you in the face. 

There are multiple events you can chart on this graph. Famous Deaths is an example of charting which week some famous people died.

Tiger Woods Major Championships (red) and Roger Federer Grand Slam Championships (blue) is another example. This chart makes it easy to track the peak years for athletes.

Tim made a blank version also available for you to fill in your own events or add some world events for perspective like the examples above. What would you add?

Found of Huffington Post.


Greek Mythology Family Tree

Greek Mythology Family Tree chart

Keeping track of Greek mythology’s genealogy can cause a headache. But now, Useful Charts has released a new update to the ultimate cheat sheet called the Greek Mythology Family Tree chart poster! The tree starts with Chaos from the Primordial gods, and finishes through the last of the Olympians.

The poster is available for purchase on Amazon for $24.95

Fans of Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson books will love this poster! Covering all three generations of Greek gods (Primordial, Titans, and Olympians), it displays both the Greek and Roman names for the gods as well as their titles or functions. It is also color-coded to distinguish between sea gods, sky gods, earth gods, underworld gods, personifications, monsters, demigods, and mortals.

This is a great network map design, and way more complicated than your standard family tree. The images help tremendously.

Created by Matt Baker at UsefulCharts.com

For a detailed look at the poster, check out Matt’s video:


Best Film Awards From Around the World

 'Best Film' Awards From Around the World infographic

In America, winning an Oscar is a dream come true for people in the film industry; however, the award is not one of a kind! There are many ‘Best Film’ Awards From Around the World and Robert Shaw has created this infographic to illustrate the coveted trophies.

The awards illustrated here represent only a small fraction of the festivals that celebrate achievements in cinema throughout the world. It is by no means a definitive list.

The criteria for this infographic was to include awards that hold a dedicated trophy or statuette for an overall ‘Best Film’ category, presented in ceremony for at least four years. However, some exceptions do appear in order to show as many nations as possible.

I think the size of this infographic is the primary message. I know many people don’t like tall infographics, but in this case that is the primary design element. It’s also eye-opening information because I would guess that most readers would have no idea that there are this many different film award organizations in other countries.

Thanks to Robert for sending in the link!


The True Cost of a Bad Hire

The True Cost of a Bad Hire infographic

The True Cost of a Bad Hire infographic from Executives Online in the UK puts into perspective the £4.13 billion a year that UK businesses are losing from a bad hire. With one £50 note being less than 1 mm thick, the stack would reach about 933 meters tall. London’s Big Ben is 96 meters tall.

People are a businesses most valuable resource. Actively finding and attracting top talent is a never-ending task for any company that aspires to be the best.

The amount of new hires that don’t work out is frightening – in fact a study by leadership IQ across a range of industries and job roles found that up to 48% of new hires fail within 18 months. It’s a problem that’s estimated to cost UK businesses over £4 billion a year.

So What’s The True Cost When One Of These New Hires Doesn’t Work Out? 

Outside of the obvious salary cost, there are a significant number of tangible and intangible factors that can drive the cost of a failed hire much higher than initially estimated. 

We used an example of a £100k per annum executive to answer one question: “What’s the true cost of a bad executive hire?” We factored in salary, benefits, the cost of the recruitment and sourcing process, and the knock on effects of having a poor performing individual in a role for up to a year.

Using data from a range of external sources and our own databases we arrived at a final figure showing this cost to be around three and a half times more than a year’s salary. To demonstrate the scale of this cost we laid it all out in a infographic as well as breaking down how that cost was arrived at.

So Why Do Bad Hires Happen?

Part of this failure to make successful hires is down to company policies focussing on hiring cost rather than ROI.

As Steve Jobs put it: “A small team of A+ players can run circles around a giant team of B and C payers… I’ve noticed that the dynamic range between what an average person could accomplish and what the best person could accomplish was 50 or 100 to 1”.

Next time you’re making an executive hire, remember what it will cost if it doesn’t work out! 

It’s a long/tall infographic design, but I think that the length is actually part of the visual story in this case.

Visually, the grids would be easier for readers to understand if the rows were 10 icons across instead of 20. We live in a Base-10 society. Rows of only 10 would make the infographic twice as long, but an alternative would be to add some spacing to visually separate the left 10 from the right 10. Same thought for vertical spacing. It would help to have a gap in the icon grids every 10 rows.

The confusing part is that every icon is a £50 note, so with 20 icons, each row represents an even £1,000. That’s why I think they designed the rows to be 20 icons across.

Odd that they published the infographic as a transparent PNG file.

Thanks to Alex for sending in the link!


How to Build a Website in 2015

How to Build a Website in 2015 infographic

Do you have plans to build a website soon? There are three major different workflow styles. How to Build a Website in 2015 from Rukzuk has shown the 3 most popular workflows so that you can pick the style that fits your skills.

There’s tons of different ways to get from client briefing to a live, working website. We’ve put the three most popular workflows up against each other. What’s your workflow of choice?

Simple clean design that does a good job of comparing the three different workflows without overwhelming the reader with too much information. Great job with the Creative Common license and complete list of data sources!

Found on Rukzuk.com


Ten Classic Superhero Vehicles

Ten Classic Superhero Vehicles infographic

There are many popular superheroes from comic books, but not all of their vehicles are well known. The Ten Classic Superhero Vehicles infographic from Cherished Number Plates has illustrated a few of the lesser known choices of transportations of our heroes.

Here is an infographic we have created that takes a look at some of the less common classic superhero vehicles, from The Punisher’s Battle Van to The Flash’s rather unusual Cosmic Treadmill. Each vehicle - with the obvious exception of Wonder Woman’s Invisible Plane - is lovingly illustrated and presented in this infographic.

Light, fun content. Tangentially related to license plates.

The infographic footer is missing both a copyright (or Creative Commons) statement and the URL directly to the infographic landing page so readers can find the original, full-size version.

Thanks to Dave for sending in the link!