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Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum
President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization and Infographic Design

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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NEXT EVENT: September 6, 2016

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Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Thursday
Jul072016

Which Foods Are Really Healthy?

Is Sushi ‘Healthy’? What About Granola? Where Americans and Nutritionists Disagree

After surveying nutritionists and Americans, the NY Times has plotted the results, showing some surprising disagreements. Is Sushi ‘Healthy’? What About Granola? Where Americans and Nutritionists Disagree charts the differences in opinion, but where do you stand?

We surveyed Americans and a panel of nutrition experts about which foods they thought were good or bad for you.

Is popcorn good for you? What about pizza, orange juice or sushi? Or frozen yogurt, pork chops or quinoa?

Which foods are healthy? In principle, it’s a simple enough question, and a person who wishes to eat more healthily should reasonably expect to know which foods to choose at the supermarket and which to avoid.

Unfortunately, the answer is anything but simple.

The results suggest a surprising diversity of opinion, even among experts. Yes, some foods, like kale, apples and oatmeal, are considered “healthy” by nearly everyone. And some, like soda, french fries and chocolate chip cookies, are not. But in between, some foods appear to benefit from a positive public perception, while others befuddle the public and experts alike. (We’re looking at you, butter.)

They also created some supporting graphs that highlight the major differences. This one shows the largest differences where many more nutrition experts consider these foods to be healthy than the general public.

Foods considered healthier by experts than by the publicThanks to Karen for sharing on Facebook!

Wednesday
Jul062016

The Ultimate Hot Dog Style Guide

The Ultimate Hot Dog Style Guide infographic

The Ultimate Hot Dog Style Guide from Food Republic is your go-to guide for all the popular styles of hot dogs!

It’s not just a sausage in a bun; it’s a beautiful blank canvas. It’s a hot dog, which is a foodstuff eaten worldwide. Here are 40 distinctive varieties from around the globe — from iconic NYC “dirty water dogs” to fully loaded South American street-cart dogs to Japanese octo-dogs. There is a tubesteak out there for every craving that ever was. 

The Coney dog remains my all-time favorite!

Thanks to Alton Brown for sharing on Facebook!

Wednesday
Jun292016

The U.S. MiseryMap of Flight Delays

The U.S. MiseryMap of Flight Delays Map Infographic

Stuck in an airport? The MiseryMap from FlightAware shows a real-time view of flight delays and cancelations at the top 30 airports in the U.S.

Doughnut charts highlight the totals for each major city (combining airports if there are multiple) and hovering or clicking a specific city will show the flight routes (sankey diagram style) that are experiencing delays and cancelations. The full details are shown in the barr chart sidebar.

Pressing the play button will animate the map for the last 48 hours showing the changes to the weather map overlay, and delays in 4-hour increments. The overall size of each doughnut also seems to represent the total number of flights from that city in each 4-hour increment.

The U.S. MiseryMap of Flight Delays Map Infographic DFW

Thanks to Mary Kaye for sharing the link!

Friday
Jun242016

How Britain Voted in the E.U. Referendum

How Britain Voted in the E.U. Referendum map infographic

Britain voted on Thursday to part ways with the European Union. The vote was incredibly close, and this choropleth map visualization from the NY Times tells an intriguing story.

Britain has voted to leave the European Union, a historic decision sure to reshape the nation’s place in the world, rattle the Continent and rock political establishments throughout the West.

The margin of victory startled even proponents of a British exit. The “Leave” campaign won by 52 percent to 48 percent. More than 17.4 million people voted in the referendum on Thursday to sever ties with the European Union, and about 16.1 million to remain in the bloc.

Britons voted on Thursday to leave the European Union. The Leave side led with 17.4 million votes, or 52 percent, versus the Remain side’s 16.1 million, or 48 percent, with a turnout of around 72 percent.

 

Wednesday
Jun222016

Venn Diagram shows Tesla-SolarCity-SpaceX overlap

Venn Diagram shows Tesla-SolarCity-SpaceX overlap

Yesterday (June 21, 2016) Tesla Motors offered to acquire SolarCity for $2.8 billion in stock. Unless you pay close attention, you may not realize that these are both companies headed by Elon Musk. The Wall Street Journal (subscription required) has visualized the shared investors and board members with this clear Venn Diagram showing the overlap between his three companies: Tesla, SolarCity and SpaceX.

The graphic helps put the merger news into context for the readers. The best infographics and data visualizations make complex information more approachable and understandable for the audience, and this one does that very well.

Found on TechCrunch, where you can see the design.

Friday
Jun172016

Pay Per Click Checklist

Pay Per Click Checklist infographic

When you have an AdWords PPC campaign, it is not a set-and-forget system. To get the most from your system, you should follow an on-going, structured plan like the Pay Per Click Checklist infographic. Midas Media has designed this simple infographic to maximize your PPC results.

When you hear people talk about Pay per Click (PPC) Management they typically mean Google AdWords.

That said, PPC now spans a whole spectrum of platforms from social media, content, display and of course ‘the daddy’ Google search itself.

This actionable PPC optimisation checklist is directly attributed to managing an AdWords PPC campaign, but it’s fair to say it can be applied to other paid search marketing too. It can also be used as the basis for a campaign review and audit check list.

This is published on the landing page as a good combination of longer article with more in-depth detail, and a simple infographic that is easy to understand and share.

Thanks to Ed Leake for sending in the link through Twitter.

Monday
Jun132016

Choosing the Right Explainer Video

Choosing the Right Explainer Video infographic

Are you choosing the right explainer video? Infographic from Yudle takes a close look at the different types of videos that can be used to explain your business or product to audiences.

We all love an explainer video whether we’re informing ourselves on the mechanics of black holes, looking for an easier way to recruit new staff, or finding out how to fix that leaky tap. The question is, if you’re looking at creating an explainer video for your global organisation or startup company, do you know what you’re looking for?

This helpful infographic from our team here at Yudle Animation provides a guide for anyone who wants to get an animated explainer video made.

Great information, but too much text in this design. A few stats are also only shown in text, and should have been visualized to make a bigger impact on the readers.

The URL directly to the infographic landing page should be included in the footer of the infographic itself so readers can find the original, full-size version when people share smaller images of the infographic without linking back to the original.

Thanks to David for sending in the link!

Thursday
Jun092016

The U.S. Baby Bust

The U.S. Baby Bust fertility rate

The U.S. Baby Bust is shown in 5 line charts by the Wall Street Journal. Sometimes a clean & simple line chart is the best way to show your data.

The general fertility rate fell in 2015 to tie the lowest level on record. Fertility, defined as the number of live births per 1,000 women ages 15-44, has never been lower than the rate recorded last year and in 2013.

It’s no surprise that Americans are having fewer babies than in the years after World War II, when there was an incredible baby boom. And it’s of course well known that people generally have smaller families today than in the past. Add the severe economic recession that began in 2007 to the picture, and you have the elements to push the birth rate to record lows.


The U.S. Baby Bust age groups of mothers

In this second chart showing the various age groups, the rainbow of colors is a little distracting. One way to tell a specific story with this chart would be to only color the lines that have increased over time, and make the rest shades of gray. That would tell the story that the women in their 30's are the dominant growth age groups.

A separate chart highlighting the lines for teens and 20's would better tell the story of women putting off having children until they are older.

Go check out the WSJ article for the other observations they made from the data.

Friday
Jun032016

The Global Air Transportation Network

The Transportation Clusters infographic is a force-directed map of the 3,275 global airports and all of the connecting flight routes. Designed by Martin Grandjean, each bubble represents an individual airport and the bubble sizes represents the number of flight routes (37,153 routes in total) based on OpenFlights.org data.

People travel not just more frequently, but increasingly far and quickly. Mapping the connections between all the airports worldwide is a fascinating network visualization exercise.

This post (which may be followed by further experimentations in this area) is an attempt to make explicit the network behind air transport. The structure of the relationships has an impact on the spatial distribution of nodes in a graph. Let’s see how this landscape is reorganized without geographical constraints.

This “map” is the result of the application of a force-directed layout algorithm on a graph of 3.275 airports (37.153 single routes – the weighted total is higher because many airlines take the same route), based on OpenFlights.org data. Naturally, network geography is not completely disrupted: the continents are mostly visible and regions are generally in their original position (with the exception of the Pacific islands that connect Asia and America – imagine this graph in three dimensions, with the Pacific Ocean behind). Major observations: India is more connected to the Middle East than to South and East Asia. The Russian cluster is very visible, connecting airports in Russia but also in many former Soviet republics. Latin america is clearly divided between a South cluster and a Central American cluster very connected with the U.S.

The force-directed layout spaces the bubbles apart so there are no overlapping bubbles. The color coding is a color spectrum based on longitude, and generally groups airports from the same continent together. The total number of flights is much higher than the number of routes because many airlines share the same routes. I would like to see a version that weights the connecting lines with the number of flights that share that same route.

Here you can see the original map with the bubbles accurately located geographically, but a lot of overlap based on close proximity of the airports:

Martin also published a cool animated GIF and YouTube video of the change from geographical to force-directed layout.

 

Found on FlowingData

Thursday
Jun022016

Diabetes: The Silent Scourge

Diabetes: The Silent Scourge infographic

Diabetes: The Silent Scourge is a great 2-page spread infographic designed by Adolfo Arranz for the Today newspaper in Singapore. A worldwide growing health issue!

An estimated 422 million adults globally were living with diabetes in 2014, compared with 108 million in 1980. The global prevalence (age-standardised) of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7 per cent to 8.5 per cent in the adult population. This reflects an increase in associated risk factors such as being overweight or obese. Over the past decade, diabetes prevalence has risen faster in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Infographic spread page for Today newspaper.

Diabetes: The Silent Scourge infographic newspaper photo

Notice the creative use of half-circles proportionally sized to match the "By Region" data. This accurately represents the data, but only take half the space on the page!

The use of many different visualization methods also helps the readers understand that there are many different data sets being shown. Slopegraphs, rose diagrams, colored map, bar charts, stacked bar charts and the half-circles all shown different facts about the diabetes epidemic.

Great work Adolfo!