About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Tuesday
Oct012013

What Are Anxiety Disorders?

What Are Anxiety Disorders? infographic

What Are Anxiety Disorders? is a very detailed infographic from Global Medical Education to help people understand the history, issues and treatments of anxiety disorders.

Anxiety disorders are the commonest psychiatric illnesses globally. There is no test for anxiety disorders like panic disorder, PTSD,OCD or social anxiety disorder and the diagnosis is based on a good history and examination. The signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders are often missed or explained away. Anxiety disorders are also commonly comorbid with other psychiatric disorders particularly mood disorders.

There is no cure for anxiety disorders but very effective treatments are available with a good evidence base. The treatments for anxiety disorders include medications like benzodiazepines, SSRIs or SNRIs or other new generation antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, as well as augmentation therapies.  Several proven therapies are also efficacious in patients with anxiety disorders. These include cognitive behavior therapy, relaxation training, and prolonged exposure therapy. Yoga and meditation have also demonstrated benefits.

There is a lot of information in this design.  It’s all good, but packing this much information into one infographic is a risk.  On one hand, all of the major information in included in one place.  On the other hand, an infographic this big with this much text will discourage many readers that are looking for a fast and easy explanation.  The overall design can be intimidating to readers that are evaluating the amount of time they would need to invest in understand the information before they start reading.  Many will leave before reading any of the infographic.

Thanks to David for sending in the link!

Tuesday
Oct012013

The Rise in Mobile Video

The Rise in Mobile Video infographic

The Rise in Mobile Video from Digital Surgeons takes a look at the confluence of data behind the growth of mobile devices and the growth of video content made for those mobile devices.

Mobile video offers brands a new and interesting way to interact with it’s customers. It’s not about the platform, it’s about telling engaging stories and connecting with audiences.

We took all of that pesky research around the current state of mobile video and condensed it into a beautiful infographic. It’s our pleasure to present the Rise of Mobile Video Infographic.

They have gathered some fantastic data together in this infographic, and the data tells a great story.  The simple color scheme is easy on the eyes, and the use of icons and logos for the different device brands helps to reduce the text.

However, the design is visually noisy, and hard for the readers to follow.  Here are a few tips that could make this infographic great:

  • Big fonts are not data visualizations.  If you want your audience to understand the data, the design needs to visualize it to put the value into context for the reader.
  • Values not visualized are perceived as being less important.  Readers are skimming the infographic because they expect an infographic to make the data fast and easy to understand.  Usually they will skip the text and look at the visuals first.  This means that any values not visualized are skipped when the readers are skimming.
  • Streamline the path of information.  An infographic should walk the audience sequentially through the data, building up the conclusions.  In this design, the major sections move top-to-bottom, but within each section is a random placement of statistics.  Some are side-by-side and some are top-to-bottom.  It’s hard for the reader to understand where to move next after each statistic.  A clean, linear flow would be easier to read.

Thanks to Alex and Peter for sending in the link!

Monday
Sep302013

10 Things You Probably Didn't Know About the iPhone

10 Things You Probably Didn't Know About the iPhone infographic

10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About the iPhone from NextWorth takes a look at some of the amazing stats and facts about Apple’s flagship product.

Designed by InfoNewt, this infographic is a good case study in topic selection and release timing.  September was a month full of Apple iPhone news and hysteria surrounding the release of the new iPhone 5S, the iPhone 5C and the major upgrade to iOS 7.  There were a bunch of infographics released about the rumors surrounding the new phones, but as soon as the new iPhones were officially announced all of the rumor designs became obsolete.

The topic choice and data visualized in this design has a much longer online lifespan.  The content about the history and growth of the iPhone will be relevant for at least a year, maybe longer.  The infographic will continue to drive traffic and links to the NextWorth site.

Monday
Sep302013

15 Years of Google Search

15 Years of Google Search timeline infographic

Last week, Google celebrated its 15th year, and posted the Google Search Timeline to help remember how far we have come in that time.

Google Search is turning 15. Remember what it was like to search in 1998? You’d sit down and boot up your bulky computer, dial up on your squawky modem, type in some keywords, and get 10 blue links to websites that had those words. It seemed like magic (and it was way way faster than card catalogs and microfiche!).

The world has changed so much since then: billions of people have come online, the web has grown exponentially, and now you can ask any question on the powerful little device in your pocket. You can explore the world with the Knowledge Graph, ask questions aloud with voice search, and get info before you even need to ask with Google Now.

I love the visual design, with icons and minimal text in the design to show all of the major milestones.  

I don’t understand the increasing area chart across the bottom though.  It isn’t representing any data, and each step up coincides with one of the major advancements across the top.  It’s visual, but it doesn’t have any meaning.  You would think it could show the growing total number of searches or stock price or amount of data processed.

Found on TechCrunch


Saturday
Sep282013

Gone To Press!

It’s out of my hands!

This week, my project editor at Wiley told me that Cool Infographics the book has officially “gone to press!”  That means that all of the electronic layout files have been sent to the printer, and the book is in the printing schedule.  The official release date is October 28th, from online book retailers and should even include your local bookstore!

Over the last 12 months I’ve been gathering all of the materials together into the binder you see above, but I’m super excited to see the complete printed book.  I can’t wait to see the printed copy and share it with everyone.  You’ll love the full-color infographics and data visualization examples included.  The final book will be close to 380 pages!

Intended for everyone, not just designers, the book explains how to utilize infographics effectively as part of a content marketing strategy.  Things like how to structure your information flow, how to choose a topic, how to be credible to your audience, and how to publish and promote your final infographic design.  Just like this site, the book includes visual examples from designers and companies all over the world.  I designed a bunch of custom data visualizations for the book, but most of the examples are some of the coolest infographics from the web.

You can find out more about the book on the dedicated landing page I setup here: coolinfographics.com/book

To receive the book as fast as possible, pre-order your copy today from Amazon, Barnes & Noble or directly from Wiley!

 

Friday
Sep272013

The Anatomy of Sangria

The Anatomy of Sangria infographic

A good way to start the weekend!  The Anatomy of Sangria from Wine Enthusiast Magazine is a nice visual explanation of what goes into making sangria, including different variations of ingredients.

It’s sometimes tough to know where to start when making sangria. In addition to selecting a red wine or white, there are several elements to consider: Which fruit will you use? What mixer will you add? Will you choose a savory or sweet garnish? Flavor combinations can make or break even the simplest of sangrias, so to make sure your next batch is stellar, use the guidelines below to create a version that promises to suit your palate—and your guests.

Bright, colorful design using photographs of the different ingredients is visually appealing and should get shared frequently.

This is also a great example of a long Online Lifespan topic for an infographic.  The ingredients for making sangria don’t change, so the infographic will be relevant for years to come; driving traffic and links to the website.

The footer should include a copyright statement, and the URL to the infographic landing page so readers that find this infographic on other sites can find the original full-size version.

Found on Foodista

Friday
Sep272013

SciFi Starship Comparison Chart

SciFi Starship Comparison Chart infographic

This is a massive Starship Size Comparison Chart, created by designer Dirk Loechel and posted on DeviantArt.

The design gathers ships from many different science fiction movies, tv shows and games, and sizes them down to a common scale so viewers can grasp the relative size of how large and small the ships they recognize are.

As this get shared heavily online, it would be nice to have the URL back to the original, full-size version included in the design.

I love this size comparison design!  The subtitle mentions that Dirk’s design is “based on the work of others”  A much smaller Starship Size Comparison Chart was one of the first posts on Cool Infographics back in July of 2007, and that version is no longer available online.

Thanks to Mary Kaye for sending me the link!

Wednesday
Sep252013

Your One Month Guide To Beating Clutter

Your One Month Guide To Beating Clutter infographic

Clutter is everywhere. No matter what we seem to do, it just accumulates. Your One Month Guide To Beating Clutter infographic from Terrys Fabrics gives some helpful hints with a flowchart on how to decide what can be saved vs. tossed. There are also some specific tips based on areas of your home to help minimize clutter.

De-cluttering can sometimes be overwhelming. A room-by-room approach can make the process more manageable. By starting small and keeping up good habits, you can soon work your way towards clutterless bliss.

Thanks to Meilen for sending in the link!

Monday
Sep232013

The Ecosystem of Linkedin

The Ecosystem of Linkedin infogrpahic

LinkedIn has reached over 200 million members worldwide, making it the world’s largest professional network. The Ecosystem of LinkedIn infographic from Dynamic Search explains why LinkedIn is a must have tool for everyone.

The Ecosystem of LinkedIn includes how LinkedIn works and what you should really know. What’s the difference between endorsement and recommendation? What about job search,  personal or company profile, groups and connections? Below is the infographic that will simplify LinkedIn for you. Are you an employee or business owner? If so, you should have a profile on LinkedIn. Enjoy.

This design does a good job of using illustrations and diagrams to add a visual element to abstract concepts like connections and recommendations.  The text descriptions could have been simplified even further to remove more text from the design.

The footer should have included a copyright or Creative Commons license, and the URL link back to the landing page so readers could find the original, full-size version.

Thanks to Nicole for sending in the link!

Thursday
Sep192013

A Visual Guide to What Colors Communicate

The Essential Guide to What Colors Communicate infographic

When you are designing your blog or website, how do you decide what colors to use? Your choice will make a difference on how others receive and interpret your content. Dustin Stout from dustn.tv has created Color Sets the Tone: A Visual Guide to What Colors Communicate infographic to educate website builders and bloggers on how to communicate to their readers with color.

Did you know that colors communicate? The use of color in your blog design can be an essential part of how your personal brand is perceived. Color usage can either make or break your blog design, and I will show you how to choose your colors wisely by understanding what they communicate.

When new visitors land on your blog, the first things they interpret are colors. Before they read a single character, their brain is registering colors which are subconsciously (or consciously) tied to emotions, states of mind, or [preconceived ideas]. If you do a poor job at putting together the colors in your blog design, it can be detrimental to the growth of your brand.

I’ve come up with an essential guide to what colors communicate, as well as a quick infographic to reference that is free to download! 

Simple design that tells one story really well.  Quick and easy for readers to digest, and the text associated with each color is really short.  Less text is better for infographics.

The footer should include the URL back to the landing page to make it easier for readers to find the full-size original version.

Found on http://dustn.tv/what-colors-communicate/