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Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

 

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Thursday
May062010

The State of the Internet [infographic]

 

The State of the Internet is an infographic by Focus.com that shows mostly demographic information about who is on the Internet today.  I really like the “100 Circles” style to show percentages; it’s a far cry better than pie charts or bar charts.  The data is gathered from multiple sources, so it’s nice to see one infographic that shows it all.

Here we take a look at exactly who is using the Internet the most, how they are using it and how much the amount of usage is increasing. At a glance, we can see that there are the same number of men and women who use the Internet. However, their age, educational background and level of income may influence how much time they spend online.

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Reader Comments (3)

Nice one, except there's a little error in this graph. At the point of the internet penetration per country, Denmark is coloured white, in stead of the Netherlands.

May 6, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterTim

The age groupings do not span the same number of years making comparisons difficult. If there is a reason for selecting the age groups shown (most likely they were the ones available from the source), some explanation of why they are grouped this way should be offered. Why are the groups of 100 dots progressively smaller for each age group - doesn't the number of colored dots show the decrease in utilization? Does it have something to do with the distribution within the groups? If so, this is a poor way to show it. Finally, why is they 65+ age so much larger (both the title and the size of the square of dots)? This draws my attention and makes me think it is the group described by the title (highest utilization) when in fact it is the lowest utilization.

May 6, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterMEH
Wow this is very informative infographics.
I like the way you compiled it.
Very cool and easy to understand.

Thanks for the informative post.

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