About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Entries in web (185)

Tuesday
May052009

Effing Hail, The isometric infographic game!


"Effing Hail" is a cool web game you play in your browser from Intuition Games!  The isometric animation is very reminiscent of the Royskopp video for "Remind Me".  You control the wind to hold the hail in the air so it continues to grow in size before releasing it to crush the objects below.

Found on Information Aesthetics and a bunch of Tweets on Twitter!

Monday
May042009

50 Cars or 1 Bus? Infographic Advertising!

Great visual ad by Flygbussarna in Sweden!  Combining a physical construction of a bus made out of cars on the side of the road, a live webcam, and live infographic information on the website!

Every day thousands of cars are driven to and from Swedish airports. Every car holds only 1,2 persons on average which is to be compared with the Airport Coach that takes over 50. Needless to say, this makes no sense whatsoever from an environmental standpoint. To highlight this, an enormous bus was built out of 50 cars on the side of the highway to the airport. On the website, a live camera not only shows the installation 24/7 but also analyses the image and tracks each and every car going by. This data is then being used to highlight just how much emission we could save just by going by bus instead.

 Thanks to @yplim on Twitter!

 

Friday
Feb202009

Google Data Visualization Concepts


Check out GridPlane.com.  JD Hooge has posted images of some data visualization concepts he worked on with Google to look at aggregating social media topics.


I collaborated with Instrument to develop a series of data visualization concepts for Google. These interface sketches are are all based around a concept of aggregating and visualizing online media buzz across various social media outlets.



Thanks Edial for sending in the link!

Sunday
Feb152009

The Browser Wars Infographic


Great timeline infographic depicting the rise and fall of different browsers portrayed as knights marching across a field.  The data set used is available here.

It took me a while to find any information about the author, but I found this description on the Wired.com blog.

Here's a creative look at the history of the browser wars from 2002 through mid-2008. The infographic was submitted to Reddit by a user named BovingdonBug. He says he created it as part of an application for a graphic design job on a newspaper.
 Thanks Alwyn for the link!

Friday
Feb062009

ARRRRR! Where are the Pirates?!?


I had to post this one.  TorrentFreak.com revealed that The Pirate Bay has quietly released a Google powered map site that shows the locations of the bit-torrent clients.  Of course they carefully maintain the anonymity of their users.


You can click on the icon over a particular country to see their statistics.  From everything I hear, I would have thought the U.S. to have more pirates...ARRRRR!

Thanks Alwyn!

Wednesday
Feb042009

One Month of Spam


From TimGraham.net, Tim plotted out some statistics about all of the spam email he received in February 2008. 

Tim, only 208.5 spam emails a day?  You need to get your email address out into more public places!

Thanks for the link Alwyn!

Tuesday
Jan272009

The Life of a Web Article


Great infographic from the team at Eliiance.com showing how web content (articles) gets from publishing to actual consumption by online viewers.

Monday
Jan122009

Halo 3 HeatMaps


A while back Bungie.net, the makers of the Halo series of games, started tracking data on their servers about how their different online multiplayer maps are preforming.  They converted the data on kills and deaths in the multiplayer games into heatmaps, and then started publishing the maps online for everyone to see.

The advantages to players are that you can see places to avoid (areas with the highest deaths), and the locations from where the most kills come from.  The map above shows the total data for the map called The Pit.  But you can narrow down the information based on the type of weapon used.  For example the map below shows the locations of the kills made with the sniper rifle.  Meaning that shooting from these locations have been the most successful.  (Also helpful if you keep getting killed by snipers and can't find them)


"Heatmaps are the Doppler Radar System of Death in Halo 3. We're tracking encounters, weapons used and their results in a given game, collecting that data and sharing it with players visually. The key here is 'the darker the red, the more frequent the deaths (or kills, depending on the parameters)'," Bungie explains in its weekly update.

Thursday
Jan082009

Infographic Video: The Histoy of the Internet


History of the Internet from PICOL on Vimeo.

Cool video created by Melih Bilgil

"History of the internet" is an animated documentary explaining the inventions from time-sharing to file-sharing, from arpanet to internet.  The history is told with help of the PICOL icons, which are also a part of my diploma. The icons are soon available for free on picol.org
Found on Information Aesthetics, and thanks to Ethel for the Tweet.

Thursday
Dec182008

Chess: Watch the Artificial Intelligence


This is really awesome.  Thinking Machine 4 has an online chess game that lets you watch the computer evaluate all of the future moves in real time each time its the computer's turn.
When the machine (Black) is thinking, a network of curves is overlaid on the board.  The curves show potential moves--often several turns in the future--considered by the computer. Orange curves are moves by black; green curves are ones by white. The brighter curves are thought by the program to be better for white. 
I found this posted by Nathan on Simple Complexity.