About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

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Consulting | Data Visualizations

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Entries in personal (126)

Wednesday
Jun272012

How to Properly Use Sunscreen


STACK How To Use Sunscreen Properly infographic

How-to topics are popular infographic designs, and How To Properly Use Sunscreen is a great topic to cover.  From STACK.com.  It’s over 100°F (over 37°C) here in Texas this week, so this is a very appropriate topic to share.

Most people know they should use sunscreen to protect themselves from the sun’s harmful rays. Unfortunately, few are fully aware of how to properly use sunscreen. This is particularly true of athletes who train and compete in the sun throughout the summer.

If you’re spending long hours in the heat this summer, sunscreen could become your most important piece of training equipment. Check out the graphic below to learn how to select the right SPF, understand application and find out how different conditions impact the need to use and reapply sunscreen. Don’t find yourself sunburned on the sideline this summer because you failed to educate yourself on how to properly use sunscreen.

As strong as the topic is, I see a number of design improvements that could be made:

  • The stats need to be visualized!  The definition of SPF would have been a great data visualization comparing one hour in the sun without sunscreen to 15 hours in the sun with SPF 15.
  • I love the varying degrees of transparency in the shadows behind the shield illustrations for the different levels of SPF
  • Overall, there’s too much text.  More than a normal reader will take the time to read.
Friday
Jun152012

200+ Infographic Resumes, an escalating trend

Pinterest Board of Infographic Visual ResumesPinterest Board of Infographic Resumes

Back in January of 2010, I posted 16 Infographic Resumes, A Visual Trend that highlighted the start of the trend of infographics and data visualization moving into resumes.  Why 16?  Because that’s how many good examples I could find at the time on the Internet to showcase the concept.  Two and a half years later, that post continues to be one of the most viewed blog posts on Cool Infographics with an average of 3,500 views every month.  A 2.5 year-old blog post!

Since then, the idea of infographic visual resumes has exploded.  I have continued to gather links to infographic resumes, and my collection is now over 200 examples of infographic resumes that have been published online.  Instead of trying to post them here on the blog like I did in 2010, I’m experimenting by creating a Pinterest Board dedicated to sharing Infographic Visual Resumes.  I will continue to add resumes and grow the board, so follow the board if you want to see new ones as they are addded.  If you know of any that I should include, add the link in the comments or send a link through the Contact form with “Infographic Resume” in the Subject line. 

The Cinderella Story example is the Chris Spurlock resume shown below.  The story is that Chris was a graduating Journalism major at Missouri School of Journalism in early 2011, and created his infographic resume because he wanted to pursue data journalism as a career.  It was posted on the J-School blog, but quickly went viral on the Internet.  As a result, he was hired as an Infographic Design Editor for the Huffington Post!

Chris Spurlock infographic resume

I haven’t made any distintion between good and bad designs on the Pinterest board, because all of the designs can give you good ideas about types of data visualizations you can include in your own design.  The only distinction I have made is that they have to include some type of data visualization to be considered infographic.  There are many, many great graphic designer visual resumes that aren’t “infographic” so they aren’t included on the board.

Also, I have attempted to link each design back to the original owner’s site (like Chris’ resume above), but for many the public posting is on a portfolio site like Behance or Visual.ly.  If any of these should be linking to a different location, please send me a note through the Contact page, and I’ll get them linking to the correct places.

It’s definitely worth mentioning that there are a whole bunch of new online sites launching to capitalize on this growing trend.  The service they offer is to create an automatic infographic resume for you, usually based on your LinkedIN profile.  Vizualize.me, re.vu, Kinzaa, ResumUP and cvgram.me all create an infographic resume for you using their pre-designed templates.  I’ve tried to only include a couple examples from each service because 50 resumes based on the same template won’t provide you more inspiration to design your own.  My opinion is that these sites and templates are currently new enough to help your resume stand out, but very quickly the risk is that the templates will become recognized (like PowerPoint templates).

I’m planning a separate, future post about the best practices when designing your own infographic resume, but I wanted to shared the Pinterest Board with you as a resource for inspiration.

Please add a comment with your thoughts about the future of infographic resumes!

Thursday
May172012

INDi Unzipped - A Visual Business Plan?

INDi Unzipped infographic business plan

Did you know that 60% of Americans wear jeans to work? That the custom retail e-commerce market will grow by 5,000% by 2016?  The INDi Unzipped infographic from INDi Denim fills us in on the jeans we fill out!

We make custom jeans for men and women that can be fully customized in terms of style and fit. We created the infographic to show that custom is a HUGE trend in the e-commerce space and that INDi is a leader of this trend.

This is essentially a visual business plan for INDi Denim.  The infographic shows the data all about the jeans industry, the future growth of custom jeans and about INDi Denim in particular.  I would guess that the primary audience for this one is the investors and customers of INDi, but that’s a fantastic use of an infographic design!

The only thing missing from the bottom of the design, is the URL to the full-size infographic on the INDi blog.  Designers need to include the URL to the infographic so reader can find the original when the infographic gets shared, but isn’t linked back to the INDi page.

Thanks to Becca for sending in the link!

Monday
Mar262012

What About Me? - Intel's Infographic Generator

 

Intel has released What About Me?, an automatic infographic generator that connects to your own Twitter, Facebook and YouTube accounts to create a profile infographic about you.

Social media users know that discovery is half the fun. With What about Me? you can capture a snapshot of your social media life and create your own colorful image, full of clues and facts about one of the most fascinating subjects in the world — YOU!

In general, I’m not a fan of automatically generated infographics.  I find them repetitive, like PowerPoint templates, and that makes everyone’s information look the same.  This one at least incorporates a few photos of your own to give a little personal touch, but not much.

From a design perspective, the “About Me” section is the big central visual element.  I like the color spectrum and the simple icons used for the dominant categories.  It may be just my own data, but all of the percentages are small and fairly close to each other, so visually you don’t see much difference at all.  Am I really that well balanced???

In the “How I put it out there” section, the bars are all portions of the total 100%, so a pie chart or a stacked bar would have been a better chart style to use in the design.  Again, in the “When I clock in” section, these two values are portions of the total 100%, so some type of visualization that shows that would have been helpful to the reader.

I really like the simplicity of the “My Mood” section, and I think they actually made it too small in this design.  As a completely visual element it could reall be much larger and more prominent.  I would really like to have some type of editing capability, like choosing which images are included.

I think they setup the sharing function poorly.  You can save a JPG file of your own design (like mine above) to your own computer.  If you share on Facebook or Twitter it will post the infographic as a photo in your account, but the link it generates will just take someone else back to the front page to design their own.  That’s confusing because the link should be sharing your own design with others, so they would have the option to like or share your design.

If you create your own design, share post the link to your image in the comments!

Found on Mashable

Wednesday
Feb292012

The Startup Ecosystem: Predator vs. Prey

The Startup Ecosystem: Predator vs. Prey is a fun but informative infographic from udemy.  It looks at the different roles related to tech startup companies in an amusing way by personifying them as fish in the sea.

The startup waters are murky and full of hidden dangers. Below the surface, the ecosystem rests in a delicate balance between predators and prey.

To help you navigate these stormy seas, we’ve created the infographic below. Read on to find out where you stand in the startup food chain.

This one is light on data, but does convey valuable information to the reader.  The visual scale of Ubiquitous to Endangered is easy to understand, and the color coding is consistent throughout the design.

Found on Best Infographics

Tuesday
Feb282012

Payroll and Tax Deductions

 

The Payroll and Tax Deductions infographic from Paycor takes an unbelievably dry topic and makes it interesting by visually walking someone through their paycheck.  The design allows them to understand all of the different things that may come out prior to the final amount that makes it to their bank account. 

Most American workers aren’t aware of the factors that determine how much is deducted from their paychecks, yet it’s important to have that understanding so you can speak up about any errors. Read more about the details of payroll and tax deductions in this infographic.

So what exactly is that payroll software deducting from your paycheck? Typical deductions include federal income tax, OASDI, Medicare tax, disability and state income tax. Your tax bracket will range from 10% to 35% depending on your amount of taxable income. Medicare tax rates will be different depending on whether you work for a company or are self-employed.

At the state level, individual states handle taxes differently, with seven states charging all residents a flat tax rate and nine other states not collecting any income taxes at all. 

I think this is a fantastic use of an infographic to explain a really confusing and boring topic.  The visual design makes it much easier to understand and the character illustration help lighten up the topic to make it more approachable by readers.

I do think the visualizations using the stacks of cash are weak.  They show a size comparison between deduction amounts, but don’t visualize their specific value well.  There is also still more text than I would like in the design, but with this topic you do have to be clear and precise because the tax laws are so complicated.

At the bottom, the design is missing the URL for the original landing page, a copyright statement and any credit to the designer.

Thanks to Matt for sending in the link!

 

Friday
Feb102012

What's In Your Trash?

The What’s In Your Trash infographic explores what constitutes trash in America.  From Bolt Insurance, this design breaks down all of the stuff we throw away.

The cleaning services industry brings in more than $50 billion a year, from janitorial services to residential cleaning agencies, and the industry is projected to continue growing. Americans generated more than 250 tons of garbage in 2010. In BOLT’s What’s In Your Trash infographic, find out what is really in your trash and how important cleaning services and janitorial services are. Through recycling and waste incineration, as much as 90% of waste can bypass the landfill! Presented as an infographic (created for BOLT by Infographic World) to help you more easily visualize and retain this important information.

Although there is a lot of text here that could have been visualized (big fonts aren’t a data visualization), I really like the doughnut segments split apart to show different components of the trash.  It helps tell the story and lead the reader through the information top-to-bottom of the design.

Thanks to Jane for sending in the link!

Wednesday
Feb082012

Client Infographic: Hotels.com Romance Survey

 

Hotels.com has released two Romance Survey infographics that share their own research behind romance and Valentine’s Day.  Designed by InfoNewt with designer Jeremy Yingling, the two versions cover research data both the U.S. and Canada.

Pack your bags, Sweetie Pie, we’re going on a romantic getaway!  We surveyed guys and gals of different ages who shared their secret dreams about the perfect romantic weekend.  Here’s how our lovebirds responded.

It’s fun, timely information that has a long Online Lifespan (won’t change over time), so the infographics will be relevant for years.  There was a lot of survey data, and I really like how the final result mixes up different ways to look at the aggregate data by also using the available demographics to show findings by age and gender.

I was impressed with the chivalry shown by 58% of men (both in the U.S. and Canada) that feel they need to plan and pay for a romantic Valentine’s date.

 

 

Thanks to the Hotels.com team for being great to work with!

Friday
Jan272012

Weight of the Union 2.0

From Anytime Fitness has released the Weight of the Union 2.0 infographic to coincide with the U.S. State of the Union Address this week.

Last night, the President gave his State of the Union address to members of Congress and the general citizenry to report that our nation is moving in the right direction. But today we want to address what the President didn’t mention in his speech to the union. We want to discuss our nation’s biggest health concern: obesity. We are offering its own barometer for measuring progress — the second annual report called the “Weight of the Union.”

There’s a lot of data shown in this design, and a good blend of different data visualizations, illustrations and text descriptions. 

My biggest complaint is that many of the data points are just listed in text, and they could have been visualized.  For example, the dollar values showing that “Being Fat is Expensive”, should have been scaled so they could be easily compared to each other or some outside comparative spending values.

The other major issue I have is the shading of the silhouette as a stacked bar chart doesn’t work accurately.  Readers see the “AREA” of the colored sections as being representative of the values.  Because of the odd shape, you can’t just color by height.  The boots are showing the biggest value “Sleep”, but because that part of the silhouette is narrow, “Work” actually visualizes as a much bigger portion of the whole than the data really shows.

I like the inclusion of the QR Code at the bottom as a promotion tool for Anytime Fitness.

Thanks to Amanda for sending in the link!

Friday
Jan202012

A Visual Guide to Marathon Running

Taking it to the Streets: a Guide to Marathon Running is a cool infographic from CheapSally.com.

As you may already be aware, the number one resolution I made for myself for 2012 was to try my hand at running a half marathon! After some research, I decided to partake in the L.A. Marathon in March, and I have been doing quite a bit to prepare. First and foremost, I put together a handy little marathon training schedule that will help me prepare for the run of my lifetime, I also did tons of research regarding super foods that help sustain energy, and lastly I created this infographic so that all of you can learn a little bit more about what it takes to run a half or full marathon!

A great tactic for the Marketing, the information infographic is being used to draw attention to all of the coupons available on the site related to Dick’s Sporting Goods.

The design starts off slow, with a lot of text that could have been visualized, but gets much better halfway down.  I really like the sequence of information that starts with some general information, moves to fears that keeps people from taking up running, then gets into an actual training schedule and finishes with a list of marathons across the country. 

The Common Running Injuries section is well done with percentages shown in doughnuts connected to color-coded positions on the runners body.  For the non-statistical information, the illustrations are simple and easy to understand.

I love the visual Half-Marathon Training Calendar!  Even though these are just stacked bars, the reader can quickly understand a lot about the increasing training regiment required.

I though it finished weak.  The banners listing marathons throughout the year should have some visual element to it like silhouettes from the locations, or a map showing them color coded by month.  At the bottom, there should be a URL to find the original infographic, a copyright statement to be clear about allowed uses and I always prefer to see the designer listed.

Thanks to Cameron for sending in the link, and I also found it on Infographic Journal.