Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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NEXT EVENT: September 23, 2015

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Entries in internet (191)


reMap: An Amazing Visual Browsing Interface to VisualCompexity.com

Bestario has created reMap, an interactive portal to view all of the infographics posted on VisualComplexity.com, and it's amazing.  They've created semantic connection between the different infographics using tags tat allow for an incredible browsing experience.

An interactive, visual browsing interface to an infographic archive.

reMap displays visualcomplexity.com projects allowing navigation using a semantic approach and depicting relations among them. All images and texts belong to vc portal. Tags are assigned using a semantic engine created by Bestiario.
Thanks Jose!  I love it!


Create Your Own Facebook Network Graph

Create a graph of your own network of friends on Facebook with Nexus.  You've seen many visuals of Twitter and Facebook connections, but this one is especially cool because it's your own network.  That's my network chart is above, but you don't care about mine...go create your own!

Found on Twitter


Amazon Acquisitions infographic

Found on meettheboss.com, a decent infographic of the acquisitions that Amazon.com has made over the years.  Drawn like an org chart, I like that each branch represents another year, so it becomes a timeline.


Skirt Lengths on Flickr + infographic tutorial

Wendy Ding created this infographic in 2007, and recently published a complete tutorial on how she created it on Digital Arts.

After collecting data on skirt lengths and their wearers and locations from flickr.com, this information piece was created to illustrate the statistics. A bar graph, area map with call-outs, and a legend all come together to explain the skirt wearers relationship.

This piece garnered an honourable mention from the 2007 Adobe Design Contest for the digital illustration category.
Thanks for sharing Wendy!


The Story (so far) of Twitter


Graphic designed for Manolith.com, by infoshot.  It’s a reverse timeline of Twitter.

Twitter, Twitter, Twitter. Seems every where you turn these days that little blue bird is staring you right in the face. But how did it all start? Where is it all going? Who’s to say really, except you I suppose, in 140 character bursts. In the meantime let’s take a look back on some milestones of microblogging.  Please do enjoy, The Story (so far) of Twitter. Start at the bottom and work your way up on this one.



Of course, I found this on Twitter!


The Conversation Prism 2.0 has been released!

Check out the new version of The Conversation Prism 2.0 by JESS3 and Brian Solis and theconversationprism.com.  Available as a poster for $20 US on thier website, and they also have some high-resolution versions available.

I love the design of this one.  It's seems to be essentially a mind map, but much easier to read and understand.

This is an update to the original Conversation Prism that you can see here on Flickr.

Thanks Dana!  I found the link to the 1.0 version on ON:Digital+Marketing


Web Trend Map 4.0

The great team at InformationArchitects.com released their updated version of the Web Trend Map 4. (They should call it 4.0)   You can buy it as a poster for $49 from their website, or they have also made a high-resolution version available.
iA's Web Trend Map plots the leading Internet names onto the Tokyo Metro system.
Paying attention to the intersections, we grouped associated websites and ensured every domain is on a line that suits it.  As a result, the map produces a web of associations: some provocative, some curious, others ironically accurate.
Why Tokyo Metro?  Because it works.


You Need to Get Seadragon!

If you haven't checked it out yet, you need to take a look at Seadragon.  I know its from Microsoft, but I like it anyway!  Seadragon is a software project to allow users to browse and zoom into high-resolution images.  I'm especially attached to the iPhone version of Seadragon Mobile (link opens iTunes) available for free from iTunes!

One of the best things about the iPhone version is that it includes some example images, and includes some of the work from Chris Jordan.  Longtime readers of the blog know I really like Chris Jordan's series "Running the Numbers" which uses high-resolution images to visually show the viewer statistical information about how we live.


Get Your Geek Chart!

Rtkrum's Geek Chart

Recently I found the Geek Charts BETA, which looks up your usernames on a few of the popular social sites, and charts out your usage. It's charting all activity within the last 30 days.

The embedded chart is also live, so it will change over time.


The Amazon Book Map

Now this is impressive.  Chris Harrison has created the Amazon Book Map using data scraped from Amazon and which books Amazon thinks are related to each other.
Aaron Swartz, who runs theinfo.org, contacted me back in January '08 with an interesting data set. He had built a list of 735,323 books by crawling Amazon. Of course a gigantic list is pretty boring, but Aaron had also captured similarity data between books. In particular, he had amassed a whopping 10,316,775 connections (edges) between books Amazon believed were related. This allowed me to throw the data into my old wikiviz engine to spatially layout a huge mosaic of books (I let it run for a 140 hours). Items that were noted as being similar had attractive forces, bringing them together, often into large groups. Unsurprisingly, when we color coded by Amazon book category, there was an obvious coalescence. The way various high-level categorizations mix and meet also seems fairly logical.
I produced a few versions of what I am dubbing the Amazon Book Map. The first visualization is a huge mosaic of book covers, tinted by their respective category colors. I can't produce this in one go at full resolution because the memory requires are enormous. The second version uses color-coded dots. 
As you zoom into the image, you can see its built using the book cover images with a color overlay depicting the category of the book.

Thanks to @anniesmidt on Twitter for the link to this one!