About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Entries in cool (19)

Thursday
Jan302014

Cool Infographics: Best Practices Group on LinkedIn

Cool Infographics LinkedIn Group

I am excited to announce the launch of a new LinkedIn Group, Cool Infographics: Best Practices. I have personally been a part of many great discussion groups over the years and believe that this group fills an unmet need.  Please accept this invitation to join the group to share your own experiences and wisdom.

There are many groups that share infographics, but I felt that a discussion group dedicated to the craft of infographics and data visualization was missing.  This group will feature questions and case studies about how companies are leveraging infographics and data visualization as a communication tool.  Any posts that are just links to infographics will be moderated to keep the focus on engaging discussions.  Topics and questions from the Cool Infographics book will also be discussed.

Join us in a professional dialogue surrounding case studies and strategies for designing infographics and using them as a part of an overall marketing strategy.  We welcome both beginning and established professionals to share valuable tactics and experiences as well as fans of infographics to learn more about this growing field.

-Randy

 

Saturday
Nov302013

Cool Infographics 30% Off at Amazon This Weekend ONLY!

Cool Infographics 30% Off at Amazon This Weekend ONLY!

This weekend ONLY, Amazon is offering 30% Off any one print book, and you can use this deal to get Cool Infographics at the lowest price yet!  The deal ends December 1st at 11:59pm PST.  Use the promo code “BOOKDEAL“ at checkout under the “Gift cards & promotional codes” section.

You can read the details and Terms & Conditions here.

When I looked on Saturday, Amazon’s retail price was listed at $25.08 (it changes daily), and with this discount you could get Cool Infographics for only $17.56.  That’s the lowest price I’ve seen anywhere!

Monday
Oct282013

The Cool Infographics Book is Now Available! #coolinfobook

unboxing Cool Infographics book

The Cool Infographics book is now shipping!  I received my own printed copies on Friday for the first time, and they look fantastic!  It’s a special feeling to hold the physical result of 12 months of hard work in my hands.  The publisher, Wiley, did an awesome job printing them.

I know that people who pre-ordered the book have begun to receive their copies.  Everyone that pre-ordered copies should get their shipment shortly.  If you’re interested in an ebook version, I believe the Amazon Kindle version is now available, and other book sites will have an ebook version available in a couple weeks.

As I posted last week, I’ve made a free sample chapter excerpt available.  Use the online form to request the link to download the PDF sample chapter.

DON’T MISS OUT!  Time is running out to take advantage of the discount code “CINFO” to get 40% off list price on the Wiley publisher site.  The discount code is still good through the end of October (10/31/13).  Last time I checked all of the book retailer sites (yesterday), this was the best price online to get the book for only $23.99.

Friday
Oct252013

Download A Free Sample Chapter from the Cool Infographics Book #coolinfobook

Cool Infographics Book Sample Chapter

The Cool Infographics book comes out next week!

I now have a sample chapter available for download as a PDF file for FREE.  Fill out the form on the request page, and you’ll get an automated email with the link to download the sample chapter.

The sample chapter excerpt includes 30 pages from the first chapter, and covers the following topics:

  • Chapter 1: The Science of Infographics
    • Infographics vs. Data Visualizations
    • The Explosive Growth of Infographics
    • The Rise of the Informavore
    • The Rise of Big Data
    • Why Infographics Work
    • The Art of Storytelling

DON’T MISS OUT!  Time is running out to take advantage of the discount code “CINFO” to get 40% off list price on the Wiley publisher site.  The pre-order discount code is only good through the end of October (10/31/13).  Last time I checked all of the book retailer sites (yesterday), this was still the best deal online to get the book for only $23.99.

Cool Infographics Book

Wednesday
Oct022013

40% Discount on Cool Infographics Book Pre-Orders

40% Discount on Cool Infographics Book Pre-Orders

As a special offer for readers of the Cool Infographics blog, Wiley is offering a 40% discount when you pre-order the print version of Cool Infographics directly from their site.  The list price for my book is $39.99 in the United States (CDN $47.99 in Canada, £26.99 or €32.00 in Europe), so the discount brings the price down in the U.S. to $23.99 for pre-orders.  This offer is available globally from the countries included on the Wiley site.

Discount: 40% off list price

Link: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118582306.html

Discount Code: CINFO

Expires: 10/31/13

The 40% off pre-order discount is available for the month of October, leading up to the official release on October 28, 2013.

This discount is only available for orders of the print version of the book from the Wiley site.  The prices from online book retailers Amazon or Barnes & Noble change daily (or more frequently) based on their pricing algorithms, so there’s no telling what their prices will be on any given day.  That’s why the discount is only available from Wiley.  Enter the discount code “CINFO” at checkout.

Please share this offer with any friends or co-workers that would enjoy the book!

Note: Contact me for additional discounts on bulk orders for 26 or more copies for your organization.

Saturday
Sep282013

Gone To Press!

It’s out of my hands!

This week, my project editor at Wiley told me that Cool Infographics the book has officially “gone to press!”  That means that all of the electronic layout files have been sent to the printer, and the book is in the printing schedule.  The official release date is October 28th, from online book retailers and should even include your local bookstore!

Over the last 12 months I’ve been gathering all of the materials together into the binder you see above, but I’m super excited to see the complete printed book.  I can’t wait to see the printed copy and share it with everyone.  You’ll love the full-color infographics and data visualization examples included.  The final book will be close to 380 pages!

Intended for everyone, not just designers, the book explains how to utilize infographics effectively as part of a content marketing strategy.  Things like how to structure your information flow, how to choose a topic, how to be credible to your audience, and how to publish and promote your final infographic design.  Just like this site, the book includes visual examples from designers and companies all over the world.  I designed a bunch of custom data visualizations for the book, but most of the examples are some of the coolest infographics from the web.

You can find out more about the book on the dedicated landing page I setup here: coolinfographics.com/book

To receive the book as fast as possible, pre-order your copy today from Amazon, Barnes & Noble or directly from Wiley!

 

Wednesday
Jul172013

Kim Rees and Dino Citraro - What Makes an Infographic Cool?

Guest Post by Kim Rees and Dino Citraro

 

When an Infographic Isn’t

Infographics are popular, useful, and seem to be an established part of our vernacular these days. They are easy to read, quick to digest, and for the most part, can require less work to create than a more in-depth data visualization. However, as with many things that are popular and useful, they have a dubious imposter that is frequently wrongly categorized. 

 

Digital Posters

Digital Posters are everywhere and almost entirely presented under the auspices of being an Infographic. These distant cousins confuse the definition of an Infographic because while they often might be easy to read and quick to digest, they fail to expand the essence of the data by adding context and metaphor. 

A collection of cats holding a variety of mobile devices may be adorable, but it is not an Infographic. A huddle of celebrities who all have a similarly peculiar personality trait might curious, but this also, is not an Infographic. Extremely large numbers surrounding nicely formed text treatments is not an Infographic.

All of these are examples of Digital Posters.

 

If You Want to Make an Infographic, Don’t Make a Digital Poster

You might still be confused by the revelation that not all things posing as Infographics are in fact genuine, but if it’s your job to create one, here are a few things to keep in mind:

 

Add Context

One of the most important things an Infographic can do is add context. Consider this example:

The illustration on the left represents the way this information would be presented in a Digital Poster. The illustration on the right shows the same information as an Infographic. Both of these start the same information, but the Infographic allows the viewer to glean a deeper understanding through the addition of context.  A good example of a Digital Poster posing as an infographic can be seen here: http://think.withgoogle.com/databoard/

 

Expand Context Through the Use of Metaphors

Infographics can (and should) be enhanced through the use of metaphor.

Being stuck with a single number to display is maddening. How do you show size? What does its size even mean? This dilemma is an opportunity to add context and metaphor. By comparing a number to something else that is familiar, you create understanding. 

Here are some examples of adding context to the previous graphic:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/periscopic/6352095776/in/set-72157629247990061

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/periscopic/6351350561/in/set-72157629247990061

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/periscopic/6351350295/in/set-72157629247990061

 

Keep in mind that the context should match the subject matter. The examples provided above concern emails – or correspondence – and the metaphor will be most effective when it extends the topic. Making a comparison to a page of text and the time spent reading it are easy leaps of imagination because the viewer’s mind is already considering the concept of communication. If we had instead compared that number to the blades of grass in a field, the size of the field might end up being pretty large, but the goal of getting the viewer to imagine the scale of the emails requires a larger cognitive leap, and provides less impact. 

By adding metaphor to data we add dimension. Through this abstraction we gain the ability to provide complex information in a way that is accessible to a much wider audience than that which might be familiar with the specific subject matter. In addition, metaphors not only provide an easy vehicle for empathy and comprehension, they are also an excellent opportunity to add visual interest.

 

Respect the Data

Data collectors are the historians of our time. The data revolution that started with affordable large storage devices is capturing our history in the finest detail we have ever known. The process of collecting it, specifically when it is done by real people, is difficult and tedious, and largely goes unnoticed. When you visualize data, you must respect what you have, and the enormous potential it represents. Even the simplest statistic deserves more than a passing thought, or an effortless grasp at the most obvious visual display that comes to mind.

 

Do More

When creating an Infographic, the data you present must do more as a graphic than if it were presented as a number or single line of text. Adjusting the size of your text, illustrating a word found within the text, or even showing the concept embraced by a cute illustration is not enough. If you believe the data has a story to tell, then you should do your best to tell it.

 

Know Your Options 

Working with data is nuanced and requires an understanding of the appropriate types of data display. A single data set, or statistic, can potentially have multiple ways of being visualized. In the same manner, a single data presentation method can be used to display multiple types of data. Understanding the relationship between your data and your data presentation options is essential if you want to create effective Infographics.

 

Strive for Elegance and Clarity

A natural tendency is to want to include every datapoint on the screen, assuming that more data will equate to more credibility. This is logical in spirit, but counterproductive in practice. Data design follows the same rules as visual design. Remove anything you can’t justify and isn’t relevant to the message you’re trying to convey. The empty spaces, the things you leave out, can provide clarity – and can also provide an opportunity to evoke questions in the viewer’s mind (that’s a good thing). 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/periscopic/8004311938/in/set-72157631576836704

 

Use Emotion

The best way to connect with people is to elicit an emotional response. No matter what the subject matter, visualizers need to have empathy for how people will feel when they reflect on the data we’re presenting. Sock, joy, sorrow, curiosity, and other strong emotional reactions likely illustrate that you’ve chosen an important dataset and are presenting it well. In many ways, the ultimate compliment an Infographic creator can receive is to know that a viewer of their work is being moved at a level that goes deeper than just an intellectual response. 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/periscopic/8601076022/in/set-72157633115411317

 

Be Authentic and Sincere

Presenting datapoints without consideration for what they represent shows a lack of empathy. When you visualize data, it is essential to understand the role it plays in the larger social conversation. If it has the potential to change a person’s worldview, you need to do whatever you can to make this happen. Divorcing yourself from this responsibility is the sign of on uninspired designer. Imagine you are actually having a conversation with the viewer. Let your design choices begin a dialog.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/periscopic/6792935314/

 

Know the Difference

Data is easy to love. It represents truth and clarity, and can inspire people to grab whatever living thing is nearest to them and insist it listen. It can move a person to join a protest, to shout a slogan, or even inspire someone to make a poster. Even a digital one.

When we begin to discern between graphical representations of data and actual visualizations of data, we become better data consumers and better knowledge creators. There is a place for Digital Posters, it’s just not the same place as Infographics.

 

 

Kim Rees

Partner & Head of Data Visualization (@krees)

Kim Rees is Head of Information Visualization at Periscopic, and is a prominent individual in the data visualization community. She has presented at several industry events including Strata, OSCON, Wolfram Data Summit, VisWeek, Tableau User Conference, NY Hacks/Hackers, and Portland Data Visualization among others.

She is an advisor to the US Congressional Budget Office. Kim has published papers in Parsons Journal of Information 

Mapping, was an award winner in the VAST 2010 Challenge, and is a guest blogger for Infosthetics and FlowingData.

Recently, she was the Technical Editor of Visualize This, by Nathan Yau of FlowingData. She was a judge on the WikiViz Challenge 2011 and CommArts Interactive Annual 2012.

 

Dino Citraro

Partner & Head of Strategy (@dinocitraro)

Dino Citraro is Head of Strategic Design and Operations at Periscopic, and has a strong background in problem solving, creative direction, and writing. 

A twenty-year veteran of the multimedia industry, his work has spanned immersive online development, application design, interactive motion pictures, multi-player games, and interactive hardware installations.

He is the Visualization Editor of the Big Data journal, as well as a contributing blogger to several industry sites. He is also an accomplished photographer, a published poet, and has written & illustrated seven children’s books.

Wednesday
Jul102013

Matthew Dunn - What Makes an Infographic Cool?

Guest Post by Dr. Matthew Dunn

What Makes an Infographic Cool?  Beer.

Beer is cool.

So is an infographic on beer cool?

I think this one is cool:

The Very Many Varieties of Beer infographic poster

But, unfortunately for the guys at Pop Chart Lab:

  • First Rule of Cool: “The act of discovering what’s cool causes cool to move on.”

Dang, if I think this is cool, it must not be, because

  • Second Rule of Cool: “Cool cannot be manufactured, only observed.”

plus

  • Third Rule de Cool: “…can only be observed by those who are themselves cool.”  *

I discovered this, and I’m not cool. (Never have been. Never will be.) So, Pop Chart Lab guys, I apologize for thinking The World of Beer infographic is cool, and killing you on #1 and #3.  But leaving aside my fondness for the subject matter, here’s why it’s cool.

1) Show More In Less. 

This shows me much more about beer varieties on one page than could be written in one page.  It makes effective use of a few visual-communications principles - connection, clustering, scale and typography - to help me traverse, relate and generally make sense of 300+ different beers and about 100 varieties. That’s thousands of relationships in one page; if they’d have typed all that, I’d have gone out for a sample instead.

Many of the awful constructs that set out to be “infographics” manage to say in one large page what could be said in one short paragraph. They’re long on decoration and stylistic flourish, short on substance. Not cool.

2) Structure Is Chancellor **

The visual design here is driven by the structure of the subject matter.  They didn’t draw a bunch of circles and lines and say “Hey, let’s fill these in with beer varieties!”.  Likewise, the aesthetic choices - color, line, typography for example - serve the subject matter instead of overriding it.  (The quasi-Victorian look underlines the historical longevity of beer varieties, for example.)  It’s also worth pointing out that visualization is more effective with this structure than language.  Describing all of these formal relationships in English (or your language of choice) would be ponderous and far, far longer. 

Run-of-the-mall infographics tend to impose style on structure. Not cool.

3) The Goal Is Understanding

A very old-fashioned criterion for cool, admittedly, but absolutely key IMHO.  I happen to like Arrogant Bastard Ale (top-left); understanding that it’s an American Strong Ale, which is an offshoot of Strong Pale Ale, in the flick of an eye…is cool. It delivers on that criterion called “utility value” in the intellectual-property world - ‘does something useful’ - because it helps me understand more, more quickly - at least up to the limits of consumption in this case. (Will I remember all of it? No. Is it in Evernote for future brewpub visits? Yes.)

Not-cool infographics tend to aim at goals external to understanding of the subject matter - goals like SEO ranking, keyword packing, and branding.  These are fine business goals, but pretending to inform me is an Arrogant Bastard move, really. It’s a trick of the form - “look at our cool infographic” masking “look at us.”  It’s interrupt advertising masquerading as content marketing and that’s not cool.

Infographics (a portmanteau nobody should carry) tend to split along data-rich and decoration-rich. The World of Beer isn’t a Big Data set - but it’s a respectably difficult subject to tackle.  There’s some real design integrity to this piece - no CGI trickery or typographical back-flips because that would be wrong for the subject.

It’s a personal bias, to be sure, but I find the coolest infographics tend to have that kind of restraint and class. They aim more at connecting me to the subject matter than the subject maker.  That’s me; may not be you.  Cool, like beer, is a matter of taste.

* Malcolm Gladwell, The Coolhunt, New Yorker, 1997.

** There are too many “content is king, ______ is queen” tropes, you don’t need another.   Where content is king, structure is the power behind the throne.

 

Matthew Dunn is Chief Explainer at Say It Visually, the Explanation Agency.  

He holds the first PhD in Digital Media, which he created at the University of Washington (just before the Web was invented), and an MFA in Directing from the University of Texas.  He’s been a teacher, professor, a 9-year Microsoft veteran, a Fortune 1000 Senior VP & CIO and a tech-startup CEO.  He’s also an award-winning writer, designer, director, frequent public speaker, and an inventor, with 15 patents to date.  He launched Say It Visually with a business partner in 2008, and lives with his family in Bellingham, WA, a town of superb brewpubs.

 

 

 

LINKS:

Website: sayitvisually.com

Twitter: @DrMatthewDunn

Google+: DrMatthewD

LinkedIn: drmatthewdunn

 

Wednesday
Jul032013

Nathaniel Pearlman - What Makes an Infographic Cool?

Guest Post by Nathaniel Pearlman

Randy asked me to write a post on the topic “what makes an infographic cool?” 

Unfortunately, I hate the term infographic. The first four letters feels too casual to me, but maybe it’s a good fit for quick marketing infographics.  For my firm’s work, I prefer the terms “information graphic” or “data graphic” or “data visualization”… or “timeplot.” They seem more dignified. But then I’m a guy who insists on using the term “small, medium, and large” at Starbucks.

My quick answer is: an infographic is “cool” when it presents an important and complex story and does so with integrity and good looks. Important, because if the subject is not important, why bother? Complex, because it is complexity in information that requires visual treatment. Integrity is key for the long-term reputation of both client and design firm. By good looks I mean good aesthetic design, crucial for both pride in our work and the reception it receives from our audience.

(Perhaps an infographic graduates from “cool” to “warm” if it is especially good, and if one is really beautiful, which is quite rare, it could be called “hot” or “awesome” or “epic.” For this reason, I advise Randy to reserve warminfographics.com, hotinfographics.com, awesomeinfographics.com, and epicinfographics.com if they are not already taken).  [Randy: Most are already taken]

Maybe my history explains my resistance to the term infographic. My route to practitioner in this field was quite indirect. A class I took in 1987 with Professor Edward Tufte sparked my original interest. At the time he had written only one book of his four classic books on the visual display of quantitative information. For that class, I hunted for historical examples of good statistical graphics in the stacks of Sterling library, and got the bug.  But, though I continue to collect examples to this day, filling up my map drawers, it took me some twenty years of other activities (graduate school, founder of software company, CTO for presidential campaign, husband and father), before I started making Timeplots (www.timeplots.com).

Anyway, I’ve become pretty opinionated about what makes an information graphic cool. My strong preference leans to working with data and stories that have potential to impact public policy or to educate people about things they care about. In my view, this can be done by presenting information in a new way or pulling many threads together into a new tapestry. The form could be print, or a web-based interactive, or a motion graphic, but the work should fit the medium. The form of the graphic doesn’t have to be new or inventive, but should be the best fit for the information. I find it best to be attentive to others who are truly great at this craft, as I have much to learn.

I also prefer to work for the right side of an issue, as I see it, and to say something that matters. It’s not always possible (financially or otherwise) to find the right clients or projects to do this, but I much prefer to tell stories with data that hold the potential to make a positive difference in the world—not just to advertise a run-of-the-mill product or service. I aspire to execute work with integrity (to tell the truth with the data, to provide comparative context, to consider counterarguments, to truly explain).

We are currently working, for example, with the Center for American Progress to help show how immigration will be economically essential over the next twenty years, and how public policy ought to be shaped with that in mind. Happy to have that project.  My firm also provides yearly updates to the Death and Taxes poster on the Federal Budget. The 2014 version is just out and is available here: http://www.timeplots.com/collections/all

My consulting firm Graphicacy helps others tell complex stories visually(www.graphicacy.com). Our name (think literacy, numeracy, graphicacy) reminds us to take into account the abilities of our audience to understand the graphics we create.

Since we often work with complex data, this is particularly relevant, for unintelligible information graphics cannot be cool. 

 

Nathaniel Pearlman has been interested in visualizing data for more than two decades. Nathaniel majored in computer science at Yale and he finished all but his dissertation in MIT’s political science doctoral program. Nathaniel founded NGP Software, Inc. in 1997 (now NGP VAN, Inc.) to join his interests in politics and technology and grew that company into the market leader in fundraising and compliance software for progressive political campaigns. Nathaniel served as Chief Technology Officer for the Hillary Clinton for President campaign in 2007-8. In 2009, Nathaniel founded the information graphic products company Timeplots and reserved the name GRAPHICACY for information graphics consulting and services. Together, Timeplots and Graphicacy are dedicated to making the visual display of information more comprehensible and aesthetic.

 

 

 

LINKS:

Graphicacy: graphicacy.com

Timeplots: timeplots.com

Twitter: @timeplots

Facebook: facebook.com/timeplots

 

Wednesday
Jun262013

Peter Sena - What Makes an Infographic Cool?

Guest Post by Peter Sena

Infographics, another problem solved through design 

As a designer, everything I see is a form of an infographic. Whether the packaging on the shelves of a grocery store, to the interface in my car, down to the websites I visit each day, being able to visualize and experience information easily is a critical part of design. Infographics were born for that very same purpose, to take the complex and simplify it or capture it in a way where the viewer can easily draw conclusions from the information. If you’ve been anywhere on the web you’ve likely seen a slew of infographics plastered all over Pinterest or your favorite websites and blogs.

Cool Infographics does a fantastic job at capturing some of the best and most interesting infographics so rather than talk about a problem that is already solved, I figure I’ll walk you through a few of my recent favorite examples of data visualizations that help tell a story, evoke an emotion or speed up ones access to research.

 

Infographics that make us remember

Storytelling is one of the oldest forms of sharing information and the thing that legends are made of. Making one remember their past is a sure-fire way to truly capture the attention of your viewer. Foursquare’s recent partnership with Samsung to launch their Time Machine is a great example of how data can be visualized in a way to make us remember not just where we are, but we’re we’ve been. Tapping into viewers’ memories is a key way to trigger emotion to your viewer. Their time machine let’s you login with your foursquare account and you can take a trip down memory lane to see all the places you’ve checked into and explore that data in a very intuitive, interactive fashion.  (https://foursquare.com/timemachine)

Foursquare Time Machine

 

Infographics as a research tool

With so much data at our fingertips one Google search away, being able to drill down to find the information we’re are after is a critical need. Google’s Consumer Barometer and Real-Time Insight Finder let you browse their databases in a very visual way and look into how consumers are using the Internet, searching for and buying products, and what ways they are connecting to the internet.

Google’s Real-Time Insight Finder: www.google.com/think/tools/real-time-insights.html

Google Real-Time Insight Finder

Google’s Consumer Barometer: www.consumerbarometer.com

Google Consumer Barometer

 

Our Facebook vs Twitter infographic, received almost 13 million page views since we posted it, with reshares, likes, tweets and pins all over the internet but aside from asking us to update it with new data, the biggest request from users was the ability to see it interactive and give the ability to segment and view the data in different ways. I feel Google is doing a fantastic job at making information fun and intuitive to access and doing it with the perfect blend of form and function.

Facebook vs Twitter infographic

 

Infographics that show you how it works.

I absolutely love these infographics because they take complex devices and break them down in a beautiful designed, easy to understand way in the form of a cross-section view while incorporating aspects of the popular flat-design visual style.

Imaginary Factory

 

Why they work so well?

We’re visual beings with almost 50% of our brains being used for processing visuals. People’s attention spans are decreasing by the day due to the sheer amount of information that they are presented with. Give someone the ability to quickly scan something and you are much more likely not to lose their attention.  The good folks at NEOMAM.com put together this great infographic on thirteen reasons why our brains crave infographics, which takes a much deeper dive into the science behind them.

What infographics and data visualizations are inspiring to you these days? Shoot me a tweet and lemme know.

 

 

Peter SenaPete Sena is the founder of Digital Surgeons, a digital-first creative agency that specializes in combining design and technology to connect brands and consumers.

 

LINKS:

www.digitalsurgeons.com

Twitter: @petesena

LinkedIn: petersena