About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Friday
Sep252009

Infographic Stickers for your Walls



From Hu2 Design, cocktail recipe infographics for your wall (drink not included).  They've created different ones for Rum, Tequila, Whiskey, Gin and Vodka that show the drink recipes for the common mixed drinks.  They're also available in different colors to help coordinate with your wall colors, and the website lets you see the color graphics on different wall colors to find what you are looking for.
Hu2 Vinyl Stickers are designed to be applied to any smooth surface including walls, windows & furniture. The vinyl’s are completely removable and leave no residue.
Also available is a cocktail ingredients by percentage infographic.



They also have bath tub level indicators, cable organizers, and things not to be forgotten as you leave your house.  In addition to the infographic stickers, they offer a bunch of fun, decorative and well designed wall decals as well.  Go check them all out at Hu2.com

Thanks Romain!

EDIT: You can also follow Hu2Design on Twitter!








Thursday
Sep242009

Chris Jordan's TEDTalk 2008 - Visualizing Our World [video]

I've posted some of Chris Jordan's images here before, but here is a video of him talking about his work at TED in February 2008.

Artist Chris Jordan shows us an arresting view of what Western culture looks like. His supersized images picture some almost unimaginable statistics -- like the astonishing number of paper cups we use every single day.
Chris Jordan runs the numbers on modern American life -- making large-format, long-zoom artwork from the most mindblowing data about our stuff.
Thanks to Ben Fry for posting this on his site.

Here's a glimpse of Chris Jordan's current project in-progress on the island of Midway Atoll (http://www.midwayjourney.com/).

Wednesday
Sep232009

Check Out Your Own Online DNA - Visually



Check out Personas, an interactive, online DNA visualizer.  You enter your own name (or anyone's name for that matter) and watch the system as it categorizes you from online searches.  I've displayed my own DNA above.  The types of attributes it associates with your name are based on the text it finds in the search results.



As you watch Personas analyze the search results you can see that in my case, it doesn't differentiate between me and the other Randy Krums of the world, so our attributes are blended together into one common DNA.



Personas shows you how the Internet sees you.  Upon entering a name, it scours the Internet looking for characterizing statements to use in its analysis.  After suitable information has been found, the viewer watches as the machine tries to make sense of the displayed text.  Once it has reached its final conclusions, the resulting "Personas vector" is displayed and annotated with a minimal legend.
Personas is just one part of the Metropath(ologies) exhibit, now currently on display at the MIT Museum through September 2009 (it needs a new home!).  Metropath(ologies) is a participatory installation about living in a world overflowing with information and non-stop communication, a world in which you are simultaneously the audience and the subject.  It is deliberately ambiguous about the desirability of this communication abundance, riding the line between serene and sinister.
Found on VisualThinkMap.

Friday
Sep182009

37 People You Should Follow for Infographics on Twitter


[The Visual Guide to Twitter is from Applicant.com]

If you don't already follow me on Twitter, I'm rtkrum.  I post links to all of the Cool Infographics posts, and hold a few side conversations with people there.  I don't know how some people keep track of following thousands of people, but TweetDeck has become an indispensable tool for me.  The main reason is that I can create groups among the people I follow and of course I keep an infographic group.

Instead of featuring an infographic today, I thought I would embrace the Twitter tradition of Follow Friday and share the list of people and companies I follow related to infographics.  So here is my list of who to follow for infographics on Twitter (in alphabetical order):

Ben_Fry
Choreographics
Datamarket
DataVis
DaveGray
EagerEyes
Ethel_Baraona
Five15Design
FlowingData
GOOD
iA
infobeautiful
Infographic
InfoJocks
InfoShots
Infosthetics
Infoviz
Jess3
LifeAnalytics
Matthewhurst
Mibi
MikeWirth
Mslima
Neal_Levene
OmniGraffle
OpenRoadMaps
RaayaDesign
SND09
TeamSwivel
TimePlots
VisualThinkMap
VISup
Vizeds
VizThink
VizWorld
Xplane

I know I have to be missing some, so that's the selfish part of this request.  Who else do you follow?

Thursday
Sep172009

The History of Jack The Ripper (Infographic Poster)

 



Ryan Nussbaum is a recent graduate of the design program at Washington University in St. Louis, and he created this infographic poster mapping out the murders of Jack the Ripper.

In this exhibition panel, I mapped the possible escape routes of a chief suspect in the Jack the Ripper murders. Upon closer examination, one can see the different types of wounds and removed organs of each of the victims. The piece is meant to dispel the notion that the murders were random occurrences.

Psst…Ryan is looking for work in New York…I’m just saying.

 

 

 

Wednesday
Sep162009

Oxford Crime Heatmaps from the BBC


As part of the BBC launching thier new show called The Truth About Crime, they have launched a new "Crime Map" website that uses heatmaps to show real crime data for Oxford, England.  The heatmaps are visual representations of all the crime data available for the 12-month period from November 2007 to November 2008.

The website is designed to allow users to explore crime patterns, discover more about potential risks and take action to prevent crime.  The site features a specifically commissioned crime map of Oxford created with data supplied by the city's emergency services.

Why are you using heatmaps?
There are a number of methods for mapping crime. Currently, the technique most often used is to map crime data according to geographic areas such as postcodes, census output areas or police 'beat-codes'. The geographic areas chosen to map crime data – such as 'beat-codes' by the police – are often done so because these services deploy their resources according to their chosen geographical areas.
However, as these geographical areas vary greatly in size, when crime data is plotted on a map it is often difficult for a member of the general public to properly see and understand which areas have high or low crime rates. A large area may seem to have more crime than a small area even though this is simply because there is more space and people in that area. A small area with high crime might be hard to spot because it is simply physically smaller on the map, and therefore harder to see.
After extensive consultation with a host of experts in this specialist area, we have decided to use 'heatmaps' to display our crime data, since these offer a clear way for us all to see patterns of crime, without requiring us to have the expert knowledge of crime data analysts, nor a prior knowledge of arbitrary geographical areas. These 'heatmaps' represent the relative amount of crime according to a sliding scale of colour (as detailed in the "Key"), and provide a sense of the area where a type of crime is happening without disclosing the exact location that it took place – so as to protect the anonymity of victims
Heat maps such as these have not previously been used to any great extent in the UK, but have been used in the USA and Canada.
A number of different maps are available showing Crime Patterns Over Time, Burglary & Theft, Violent Crime, Anti-Social Behavior and the ability to compare to your own neighborhood (if you live in the U.K.)

Tuesday
Sep152009

Is the U.S. Too Dependent on Foreign Oil? (infographic)


The U.S. imports 60% of its oil requirements, and this infographic map shows the top 10 countries that are sending us their oil.  I think it will actually be quite surprising to most Americans how little is imported from the Middle East.
As much as 66 percent of all US crude oil is imported from other countries, and the amount of oil imported from OPEC nations is roughly equal to the amount of oil produced domestically. Petroleum, natural gas and coal are the primary sources of energy consumed in the United States because they are the most energy rich resources available. So far, renewables have only been capable of providing a small portion of total energy consumption, and their contribution to energy consumption has remained limited over the last two decades. However, with increasing government and private focus on green energy sources, renewables are likely to go from strength to strength in the near future.
Here's the original article by Callum James from ngoilgas.com.

Monday
Sep142009

Obama's Worldwide Stamps of Approval infographic


From our friends at GOOD transparency, is a simple infographic showing President Obama's worldwide approval rating.  I like the use of stamps to help identify the countries around the world, and that the order is representative of highest approval to lowest approval ratings.  I think this graphic lacks the use of illustration to convey the data.  The actual approval ratings are only communicated with the numbers without any graphic representation.
During the campaign, President Obama argued that his election would help restore the image the rest of the world has of United States.  In the six months since his election, his approval ratings at home have slipped, though they remain high. Around the rest of the world, opinion is mixed. A recent study by WorldPublicOpinion.org asked people in 21 countries whether they had confidence that Obama would “do the right thing” when it came to world affairs. Our latest Transparency is a look at their responses.
One other criticism would be that the text implies that we should be looking at how worldwide opinion has changed since Obama's election, but the data is actually only a snapshot of opinions six months after the election.  No indication is this is higher or lower than the opinions at the time of his election.

A collaboration between GOOD and Michael Newhouse at Newhouse Design.

Thanks Michelle for the link!

Friday
Sep112009

"Meet The Elements" - infographic video for kids

Found on BoingBoing and Information Aesthetics, a infographic music video, "Meet The Elements", from They Might Be Giants from their new kids album titled "Here Comes Science". Video directed by Feel Good Anyway.

Thursday
Sep102009

HealthMap: The Global Disease Alert Map


HealthMap.org is an online map tool that locates any reports of disease from a selection of news sources.  Available in multiple languages, HealthMap is a great use of the Google Maps API.  In fact, HealthMap is funded by Google, which explains why they are so dependent on the Google Maps data.
HealthMap brings together disparate data sources to achieve a unified and comprehensive view of the current global state of infectious diseases and their effect on human and animal health. This freely available Web site integrates outbreak data of varying reliability, ranging from news sources (such as Google News) to curated personal accounts (such as ProMED) to validated official alerts (such as World Health Organization). Through an automated text processing system, the data is aggregated by disease and displayed by location for user-friendly access to the original alert. HealthMap provides a jumping-off point for real-time information on emerging infectious diseases and has particular interest for public health officials and international travelers.
They also recently launched an iPhone app called Outbreaks Near Me, available for free in the iTunes app store.  The app allows you to view the maps from your iPhone and get alerts for outbreaks in your area.