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Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

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Monday
Feb032014

The Beautiful Flow of Pi

Flow Of Life Flow Of Pi data visualization poster

Flow Of Life Flow Of Pi.  Cristian Ilies Vasile designed this visualization of the first 1,000 digits of the mathematical constant pi using Circos to plot the sequence of digits…in a circular pattern of course!.  You can buy a print copy of the poster for $22 from Fine Art America.  Cristian has create a few different varieties of the artwork that you can see on his page.

Starting with the first digit “3”, a connecting arc is drawn to each subsequent digit (3.14159265358979323846…).  Since the sequence is theorized to be a random sequence, it creates a beautiful visualization that appears evenly distributed among the digits.  Check out this explanation by Martin Krzywinski along with some of his own artwork.  He demostrates the sequence with this visualization of just the first five digits 3.14159…

I had not heard of Circos before, so I have now added a link to it on the Cool Infographics Tools page.

Thanks to Matt Baker for posting on Google+

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Reader Comments (1)

Looking at the explanation graphic it appears that he is picking areas in each number to start and end... where/how does he come up with which place to do this... each number has an area to choose from, not just a point.
July 24, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterMark Ketchum, RN

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