About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

 

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Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Entries in video (121)

Tuesday
Aug312010

30 Years of Asteroid Discoveries Animated

This is a very cool video animation, Asteroid Discovery From 1980 - 2010, of asteroid discoveries over the last 30 years.  Not only does it show the orbits of the asteroids in relation to the inner planets, it highlights them over time as they were identified and colors them according to how close to Earth their orbits will come.

The only visual inaccuracy is the size of the asteroids.  Since the asteroids have to be at least one pixel wide to appear in the animation, they are represented much larger compared to the planets than they really are.

View of the solar system showing the locations of all the asteroids starting in 1980, as asteroids are discovered they are added to the map and highlighted white so you can pick out the new ones. 
The final colour of an asteroids indicates how closely it comes to the inner solar system. 
Earth Crossers are Red
Earth Approachers (Perihelion less than 1.3AU) are Yellow
All Others are Green

Notice now the pattern of discovery follows the Earth around its orbit, most discoveries are made in the region directly opposite the Sun. You’ll also notice some clusters of discoveries on the line between Earth and Jupiter, these are the result of surveys looking for Jovian moons. Similar clusters of discoveries can be tied to the other outer planets, but those are not visible in this video.

As the video moves into the mid 1990’s we see much higher discovery rates as automated sky scanning systems come online. Most of the surveys are imaging the sky directly opposite the sun and you’ll see a region of high discovery rates aligned in this manner.

At the beginning of 2010 a new discovery pattern becomes evident, with discovery zones in a line perpendicular to the Sun-Earth vector. These new observations are the result of the WISE (Widefield Infrared Survey Explorer) which is a space mission that’s tasked with imaging the entire sky in infrared wavelengths. 

Currently we have observed over half a million minor planets, and the discovery rates show no sign that we’re running out of undiscovered objects.

Orbital elements were taken from the ‘astorb.dat’ data created by Ted Bowell and associates at 
http://www.naic.edu/~nolan/astorb.html

Music is ‘Transgenic’ by Trifonic: 
http://www.amazon.com/Emergence-Trifo…

Quite a few journalists, bloggers and tweeters are attributing this to NASA or Arecibo Observatory - while they do fine work they had nothing to do with this. If you write a story you can credit it to Scott Manley.

Found on FlowingData and VizWorld 

Tuesday
Aug242010

TEDTalk: David McCandless: The beauty of data visualization

Our friend David McCandless, from InformationIsBeautiful.net, gave a great presentation at TEDGlobal in July 2010 on The Beauty of Data Visualization.

David McCandless turns complex data sets (like worldwide military spending, media buzz, Facebook status updates) into beautiful, simple diagrams that tease out unseen patterns and connections. Good design, he suggests, is the best way to navigate information glut — and it may just change the way we see the world.

Thanks to John and Susan for sending me the link!  Also found on VizWorld and the VizThink Blog.

 

The video is also available on YouTube:

 

Friday
Aug062010

The YouTube Flowchart

Karen Kavett is a graphic design student at the Rhode Island School of Design and she was inspired to create the So You Want To Watch YouTube flowchart after seeing the So You Need A Typeface flowchart by Julian Hansen.

I was really inspired by the So You Need a Typeface poster and figured, why not make one for which YouTube channel to watch? It was a bit of a bigger undertaking than I originally anticipated, taking about 3 days from start to finish. I began by making a list of everyone I’m subscribed to and other popular YouTubers I thought should be on it. Then I divided them into Vloggers, Musicians, and Everyone Else, and just went at making a really ugly graph showing all the different routes. I had to cut some people out since their channels were just too similar to others I had already used, so if you’re not on here please don’t feel offended. If I included everyone I wanted to it would probably be about twice as big! Finally, I designed this final piece, which luckily, everything fit perfectly into.

Nice job Karen!  I especially like the “Get out of my flowchart” endpoint!

Thursday
Jul292010

Apple iPhone Statistics 2010 infographic video

The Apple iPhone Statistics 2010 infographic video by Creative Licence Digital (an iPhone app development firm) takes a look at the numbers behind the iPhone phenomenon.

I pose this question to my readers: Is this infographics?  I think it walks a fine line between being artistic and infographic.  While a lot of numbers are shown and communicated to the viewers, they aren’t represented in any graphic form, just text.  What do you think?

Thanks to Darren for sending in the link.

Monday
Jul262010

How Does Diet Soda Cause Weight Gain? [infographic video]

Another great use of infographics, illustrations and visual examples used in a video to better communicate a message.  How Does Diet Soda Cause Weight Gain? is a video from Wellness-Works.net.  I wish they would credit the artist so we knew who made the video for them.

An informative, fun video about the importance of your food’s pH and its impact on your health.

Wednesday
Jun162010

Facebook's Secret Strategy Infographic

Art: Audrey Fukuman

There was some controversy when Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg unintentionally revealed the 2010 Facebook Strategy Infographic that was printed on the inside liner of his hoodie at the D8 conference.  Audrey Fukuman at SFWeekly.com has recreated the infographic based on the video and photos.

Photo via AllThingsD/Anna Mathat

According to SFWeekly.com, this was a hoodie given to all Facebook employees.

I expect some disagreement, but I’m a firm believer that you can absolutely design an infographic to represent a strategy, a concept or a qualitative result.  Infographics don’t have to be based only on a massive amount of quantitative, numeric data.  What do you think, does this qualify as an infographic?

Here’s the video clip from the AllThingsD D8 conference when Mark removed the hoodie and revealed the graphic:

Found on SFWeekly.com and digg.com

Thursday
May132010

Visualizing "Drive", an illustrated presentation by Dan Pink

Great job by the RSA (The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) to visualize and illustrate this presentation given by Dan Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us.

This is definitely walking the fine line between illustration and infographics, but I thought it was worthy to share.  I think the presentation is much more engaging with the visuals.  I wish I knew who the designer was so I could give him credit.

More illustrated videos are available on the RSA Videos page.

 

If anyone is interested in buying Dan’s book, this link will help support Cool Infographics.

Monday
May102010

Apple, Adobe Flash and H.264 - an infographic explanation

Enrique Serrano (@eserranocom) designed this tall banner-style infographic, Apple, Flash and H.264, to help explain the conflict between Apple and Adobe Flash.  There’s a lot of history between these two mega-companies, and even after Apple posted Steve Job’s Thoughts on Flash, it’s still not easy to understand what’s going on.

Since so much has been said about not having Flash support in the devices of Apple(mainly the Apple iPhone and the iPad) I put together as much facts as possible about Apple, Adobe, the iPhone and Flash, plus some on video codecs including Theora, H.264 and HTML 5 video.

I hope these infographics help you better understand the big picture with the current situation of these technologies and companies.

Mixing a timeline, bar charts, 100 circles, a couple pie charts and some illustrations, Enrique does a good job of covering most of the angles between Apple and Adobe.

Originally posted on Treble Click, found on Social Media Graphics.

Monday
May032010

Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics (about TEDTalks)

Very funny video from TEDActive, by Sebastian Wernicke that analyses the best and worst of TEDTalks using statistics and word analysis.

In a brilliantly tongue-in-cheek analysis, Sebastian Wernicke turns the tools of statistical analysis on TEDTalks, to come up with a metric for creating “the optimum TEDTalk” based on user ratings. How do you rate it? “Jaw-dropping”? “Unconvincing”? Or just plain “Funny”?

Found on ILoveCharts.tumblr.com

Thursday
Apr222010

Follow the Money - infographic video

Follow the Money” is a video summarizing the results from the project by Northwestern University grad students Daniel Grady and Christian Thiemann.  Using data from the website Where’s George?, they have been able to track the movement of U.S. paper currency.  What can you learn from this?  That there are natural borders within the U.S. that don’t necessarily follow state borders, and it can also be used to predict the spread of disease because it maps movement of people within the U.S.

From Maria Popova on BrainPickings.org: This may sound like dry statistical uninterestingness, but the video visualization of the results is rather eye-opening, revealing how money — not state borders, not political maps, not ethnic clusters — is the real cartographer drawing our cultural geography.  The project was a winner at the 2009 Visualization Challenge sponsored by the National Science Foundation and AAA.

 

From Manuel Lima on VisualComplexity.com: Some places, such as Los Angeles, California, have many bills passing through it from across the nation, while others, such as Anderson County in Tennessee - Grady’s home - have bills circulating mainly within a more local neighborhood. Shown here are images from the video.  The data from the Where’s George? project is in fact so pertinent that is also being used by researchers to predict the spread of flu across the United States.

You can see the Northwest project site, which has a much more adademic title “Community Structure in Multi-Scale Transportation Networks”.

Rendered using Processing 1.0.6.  Found on VisualizingEconomics.com, VisualComplexity.com and Maria Popova has a good article on BrainPickings.org.