About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

 

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Infographic Design

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Entries in timeline (204)

Monday
Oct012007

The Polar Clock


The Polar Clock, from Pixel Breaker, version 3 is now out as a screen saver for Mac and Windows. It's also available as a Mac OS X Widget.

I don't know why, but I love this clock. I'm mesmerized watching the seconds going around. With a little practice, you can visualize the time. I won't say this is the best way to visualize the time, but it's definitely fascinating.

Friday
Sep282007

The Wine Advocate Vintage Guide


From eRobertParker.com, the online Wine Advocate Vintage Guide. Fascinating guide of wines from 1970-2005. Wines are grouped by region and year, and each group is scored and given a letter code to identify the current maturity status of those wines (like Ready to Drink, Too Old and Early Maturing). The color coding represents ranges of the numeric scores.

The guide is interactive, so clicking on any of the rating circles brings you to a list of the specific wines grouped together for that region. For the specific wines, you can see their individual name, score, maturity level and price range.

A PDF version of the guide is available here for download.

Friday
Sep282007

Travel Time Maps


From mySociety.org, time travel maps take into consideration the means of travel (car, rail, etc.) and the different paths available. Above is a map of London and shows time to travel from the center of town. The white contour lines represent half hour intervals, and the color coding has warm colors for the shortest times, and cool colors for the longest times.

The really interesting feature are the "islands". These small circles represent destinations that you can reach much faster than the surrounding area. Mainly stations for faster trains than have fewer stops.

Strangely similar in concept to an "event horizon".

Monday
Sep242007

History of Computer Languages


O'Reilly has created a poster showing the 50-year history of computer languages from 1954 to 2004, available as a PDF. They have also been giving away copies of the posters at O'Reilly conferences. I love the links shown where older languages split or combined to create the newer languages over time.

I look back around 1990 when I was programming in college and see Fortran V, C++ and the birth of Visual Basic. I remember having to convince my engineering professors to let me program assignments in C++ instead of Fortran.

The original diagram was created by Éric Lévénez. Although O'Reilly is not updating the poster, Eric is keeping his original diagram up to date on levenez.com.

Friday
Sep212007

AT&T: A History


In 1984, the government broke up "Ma Bell" as a monopoly. Since then it has slowly be pulling back together. This infographic really puts all the pieces back together in a simple way that you understand immediately. Kind of like a free-form timeline, instead of the traditional, left-to-right timeline visual. The AT&T brand name is still so strong, Cingular chose to rename all of their stores AT&T after their recent merger.

Found on FreePress.net

Friday
Sep072007

The Cosmic Calendar


This last December was the 10th anniversary of Carl Sagan's death. One of his most popular episodes of Cosmos was titled The Dragons of Eden where he first described his Cosmic Calendar. This website from discovery.com has a simple image showing the Cosmic Calendar as Carl described it. A few websites are selling posters of the Cosmic Calendar, like AllPosters.com.

The premise is that if you compress the entire history of the universe into a calendar year, homo sapiens only exist in the last 6 minutes, and the last second represents the last 400+ years of human history.

You can see Cosmos, and hear Carl describe it on YouTube here:

Sunday
Sep022007

World Clock Counter


You've seen these counters on highway billboards and other websites before. The World Clock from poodwaddle.com combines many of these counters together into one dashboard.

I've added a smaller version to the bottom of the right pane here on on the blog.

Tuesday
Aug282007

A Day of Diggs


This one is really interesting. Stamen Design took one day of digg.com and visualized the user activity. The explanation is really cool, and can be found here on content.stamen.com. Stamen works with Digg on a number of the tools available in Digg Labs.

Red dots represent people that have been on Digg for a while, yellow is a good mix, and blue is new users. So when a story is predominantly blue, it represents a story that is attracting a bunch of new users to Digg.

Wednesday
Aug082007

2008 Presidential Campaign Finances


This interactive infographic from the New York Times website is really impressive. Using weekly data reported by the Federal Election Commission, it plots the contributions on a map of the U.S. and sizes the bubbles based on contributions from that city. It has data from every week since January 1st, so it will also "play" and animated version showing the contribution as time progresses (similar to the Trendalyzer that Google purchased from GapMinder).

You can also search for specific contributors to see which candidate campaigns they have contributed to, and how much they gave.

Thursday
Aug022007

Imagining the Tenth Dimension


Ten dimensions are really hard for most people to understand. Especially since our lives are constrained to only four dimensions. This video from tenthdimension.com does an EXCELLENT job of using pretty simple animation and illustrations to explain the 10 dimensions of our universe.

This video is really good, even if you're not a physicist.