About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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Entries in timeline (207)

Friday
Aug152008

National Debt and the Presidents

First, I'm not pushing any particular political agenda.  There's considerable debate around this chart, so I don't want to start any arguments.  The debate isn't around the validity of the data, but about how it's being presented.  The information is freely available from the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Bureau of the Public Debt.

Second, I like that this chart takes a simple bar chart and adds a few more layers of information.  At its root, this is a timeline of the increase in the national debt based on the federal budget by year.  Then layered on top of that are the presidents in office that year, some color coding, the political party controlling the White House and highlights for record years.

Third, just to share the reasons for the debate.  This is a great example of data being visualized with a specific agenda in mind.  Obviously, this is a chart framed to make Republicans look bad, and Democrats look good.  The debate centers around a few issues like programs started by one President will carry into the term of another President and more importantly that the political party controlling Congress actually has more impact on the federal budget than the President does.

Wednesday
Aug062008

Visual Baby Name Trends site

NameTrends.net is a fantastic interactive site that charts and maps the popularity of baby names over the last century in the U.S.  You can look at the most popular names, or search for specific names to see their results.  The chart above shows the top 20 baby names from the 2000's decade (10 boys and 10 girls).  You can see that those names also had some popularity at the end of the 19th century.

The site also allows you to map the name popularity by state.  The slider across the top allows you to see the geographic distribution by year.

Found on Information Aesthetics.

Monday
Jul072008

The iPhone Timeline

From iPhoneGold.org, is a cool little iPhone timeline.  I couldn't find an author to credit, just the website.

Found on digg.com

Tuesday
Jun172008

Code Swarm: Eclipse


code_swarm - Eclipse (short ver.) from Michael Ogawa on Vimeo.

Created by Michael Ogawa. Check out the website describing the project here.

This visualization, called code_swarm, shows the history of commits in a software project. A commit happens when a developer makes changes to the code or documents and transfers them into the central project repository. Both developers and files are represented as moving elements. When a developer commits a file, it lights up and flies towards that developer. Files are colored according to their purpose, such as whether they are source code or a document. If files or developers have not been active for a while, they will fade away. A histogram at the bottom keeps a reminder of what has come before.
Thanks Alwyn for sending in the link!

Monday
Jun162008

The Cost of Gadgets


From Wired.com, this is really a 3-dimensional chart. I liked it because there are very few 3D charts that actually portray 3 dimensions of data. (This is actually 4D if you include the different products as a dimension) Usually 3D charts are just bad use of chart styles from PowerPoint. I also like the perspective from above. Although unusual, it helps to see the whole chart.

Friday
Jun132008

The Extinction Timeline 1950-2050


Richard Dawson from What's Next (www.nowandnext.com) created the Extinction Timeline with his predictions of what products and services will disappear in the next 50 years. Also available as a PDF here. Here are a few highlights:

  • 2018 DVDs
  • 2019 Libraries
  • 2025 Desktop computers
  • 2030 Reality TV (why so long?!?)
  • 2037 Glaciers
  • 2049 Physical Newspapers
Found on Digg.com

Monday
May192008

LifeMap

Ritwik Dey charted out his life from age 6 to 24 as an infographic timeline project, and shared it on Flickr.

I just discovered Visual Think Map, which is where I found a link to the LifeMap. I added it to my blogroll on the right.

Monday
Apr212008

The Fall of Tech on digg.com


From readwriteweb.com, an area chart showing the decline of Tech stories made popular on digg.com. Although initially the front page of digg.com was totally dominated by Tech stories and the primary users were tech geeks, the World & Business category is now the reigning king with the most stories made popular.

To put this into context, on 1 January 2006 tech stories made up 78% of the total popular stories (i.e. stories that made it onto the digg frontpage). By end of March 2008, that percentage had dropped to 18-20%.


Here you can see the same information charted as total number of stories made popular instead of percentages.

Wednesday
Apr162008

Quake Family Tree

From Wikipedia, the Quake Family Tree shows the history of the Quake computer game engine and all of the other games that were built from each version using a mind map.

Found on digg.com

Wednesday
Mar192008

Iraq by the Numbers


From foreignpolicy.com, a really tall chart showing statistical information covering the last five years of the Iraq war. I'm not sure I like the idea of this big chart that covers so many different types of data. The information on the bottom half of the chart tends to get lost to the reader.