Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum
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Data Visualization and Infographic Design

Infographic Design

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Entries in relative (155)


Where we live...

Found on Data Mining, this is an interactive graphic from Time magazine showing the population density in America as a histogram. Similar to my earlier post on World Population Density, this one focuses on just America, and adds the 3d element to the visual.


Science Related Wikipedian Activity

A new visualization from the same group that did the earlier visualization of Wikipedia revision activity. This one focused on science and tech related articles. The mystery is the significance of the blue/green band that crosses the map.


Plastic Bags

Here's another one from Chris Jordan. Is it art, or is it infographic?

The image shows 60,000 plastic bags, which is how many bags are used in the U.S. every 5 seconds! The picture currently on display at the Paul Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles is 5ft x 6ft large so viewers can step up close to see all of the details.


Americans Remain Woefully Ill-Informed

Wired magazine calls infographics like this "infoporn". I guess you could call this a version of a bubble chart, but it shows a comparison of what people knew in 1989 vs. 2007. Separately it shows knowledge of three questions based on the respondent's usual source of news.

I can't tell how big the sample size was, or what type of people they interviewed. It quotes the source as the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, but that alone isn't enough to make it credible.


Radial Organization Chart

Found on Visual Complexity, this chart from 1924 is an interesting variation of an organization chart. With the authoritarian leader in the center, the subordinates are mapped outward from the center. Rings at different radii show peer level responsibility.


Population Heat Map

From CraigStats, the image above shows the population per square mile in the San Francisco area as a pseudo heat map. The site also has combined the apartment listings on Craig's List with Google maps to create pseudo heat maps showing the areas with the most apartments.


The Polar Clock

The Polar Clock, from Pixel Breaker, version 3 is now out as a screen saver for Mac and Windows. It's also available as a Mac OS X Widget.

I don't know why, but I love this clock. I'm mesmerized watching the seconds going around. With a little practice, you can visualize the time. I won't say this is the best way to visualize the time, but it's definitely fascinating.


Human Trafficking

Found on VisualComplexity.com, this disturbing poster examines global human trafficking.

"It depicts each country's level of involvement (from Very High to Very Low) as either a country of destination or origin. The project concentrates on the smuggling of people from one country to another - mainly illegally. In many cases these people are forced to do work that is illegal, such as prostitution or child labor."
The poster was created by Taulant Bushi, and the original image is here.


The Elegant Universe

Following my earlier post on Imagining the Tenth Dimension, I found that NOVA has put the entire 3-hour show The Elegant Universe on their website.

The show is full of different visual methods to visual strings, gravity, the scale of particles and multiple dimensions. Brian Greene really did a fantastic job with this show based on his book on the same name.


The Cosmic Calendar

This last December was the 10th anniversary of Carl Sagan's death. One of his most popular episodes of Cosmos was titled The Dragons of Eden where he first described his Cosmic Calendar. This website from discovery.com has a simple image showing the Cosmic Calendar as Carl described it. A few websites are selling posters of the Cosmic Calendar, like AllPosters.com.

The premise is that if you compress the entire history of the universe into a calendar year, homo sapiens only exist in the last 6 minutes, and the last second represents the last 400+ years of human history.

You can see Cosmos, and hear Carl describe it on YouTube here: