About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

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Entries in news (60)

Thursday
Oct092008

Watercube, The Book


Watercube, is a new book by Ethel Baraona Pohl.  The book is about the National Aquatics Centre built in Beijing for the 2008 Olympics, and has some cool infographics inside.  Some of the graphics were contributed by architect César Reyes Nájera.  A review of the book can be found here on www.v2com.biz
WATERCUBE: The Book is a complete monographic publication about the National Swimming Center for the Beijing Olympics 2008. With an exhaustive description about the Watercube we present a detailed study of the project. The book makes an holistic approach to the project that starts with a brief description of urban and social changes that China has been experienced in the last decade. These facts have encouraged the construction boom that made possible these kind of projects occur in cities like Beijing.

 
This page compared the amount of steel used to built the Watercube to some of the most well known buildings around the world.
This page shows a comparison to the same set of buildings around the world, but shows the tons of CO2 produced due to the steel used in their construction.


This page is one of the years of the timeline leading up to the construction of the Watercube.

Here you can buy Watercube, by Ethel Baraona Pohl, on Amazon.com.

Special thanks to Ethel for sharing the images from her book, and allowing me to post them on Cool Infographics!

Wednesday
Jun112008

Democratic Party Voting Margins


New interactive infographic by Shan Carter and Amanda Cox on nytimes.com that shows the voter margins between Democratic candidates Hilary Clinton and Barrak Obama. These are based on exit poll data.


Choose any of the sorting criteria on the bottom, and then you can see specific data about any particular state by hovering the mouse over the blocks. The top chart shows how Men voted overall, and the second chart is how voters with No College Education voted.

Thanks Les for sending in the link!

Wednesday
May282008

The world as you've never seen it before


Check out WorldMapper! Above is a map of the world based on true Land Mass, but with WorldMapper, you can adjust the size of the countries based on whatever data you are trying to convey.

This is the world map based on Total Population:


This is the world map based on Total Computer Exports:


Alisa Miller, head of Public Radio International, talks about why -- though we want to know more about the world than ever -- the US news media is actually showing less. She uses WorldMapper to communicate her point about the state of today's news in the US.

Monday
May262008

In the Shadow of Foreclosures


Great graphic from NYTimes.com showing the subprime mortgage foreclosures as a percentage of all subprime mortgages by geographic region of the country.

Wednesday
May212008

Outdoor Pictogram Headlines


Neat experiment by Dave Bowker over at Designing The News. The idea is to use pictgraphics to visualize news headlines in public places. Specifically in Europe, you could establish a universal set of icons over time that people who speak different languages could interpret and understand.

Friday
May162008

Global Distribution of Water


From the United Nations Environment Programme website, the Global Distribution of Water specifically highlights the scarcity of freshwater.

Found on digg.com

Monday
Apr212008

The Fall of Tech on digg.com


From readwriteweb.com, an area chart showing the decline of Tech stories made popular on digg.com. Although initially the front page of digg.com was totally dominated by Tech stories and the primary users were tech geeks, the World & Business category is now the reigning king with the most stories made popular.

To put this into context, on 1 January 2006 tech stories made up 78% of the total popular stories (i.e. stories that made it onto the digg frontpage). By end of March 2008, that percentage had dropped to 18-20%.


Here you can see the same information charted as total number of stories made popular instead of percentages.

Wednesday
Mar192008

Iraq by the Numbers


From foreignpolicy.com, a really tall chart showing statistical information covering the last five years of the Iraq war. I'm not sure I like the idea of this big chart that covers so many different types of data. The information on the bottom half of the chart tends to get lost to the reader.

Thursday
Mar062008

Design Journal interview


Design Journal is the magazine for members of The Society of News Design (SND). The Editor, Jonathon Berlin, approached me a while back for a quick interview to include in an upcoming issue. The interview was just published in the Winter 2008 issue (#105), which has a whole theme about data and graphics.

Unfortunately, the magazine is for members of SND only. However...


...Jonathon also published most of the interview on the SND Update blog, so you can read the interview online.

Jonathon, thank you very much for the visibility and the press!

Saturday
Mar012008

Lance's Last Tour


I found two good newspaper infographics from 2005 covering Lance Armstrong's last Tour de France on newsdesigner.com where you can get larger PDF files that make good posters. Both are two-page graphics (doubletrucks). The first is from The Oregonian (above), and the second is from the St. Pete Times (below).


Found on NiXLOG.