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Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum
President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization and Infographic Design

Infographic Design

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Entries in map (171)

Wednesday
Sep082010

The Most Widely Spoken Languages of the World

A subway map style infographic, The Most Widely Spoken Languages of the World, shows some of the primary countries and the languages they speak.  Each track is a different language, and the connection point are countries where that language is one of the dominant languages.  The actual number estimates behind how many people speak each of the top languages is listed in the legend.

I don’t know how accurate it is because the data source isn’t listed.  I would think that the U.S. would at least be a junction point between English and Spanish (and maybe others).

This infographic illustrates the most widely spoken languages in the world and some of the countries these languages are spoken in.  The station name indicates the language and the number of speakers that languages has and the map illustrates some of the countries these languages are spoken in.  The list of countries is not exhaustive but can help the viewer navigate the world of languages.
The inspiration for this map came from the London Underground map – which in fact is not a map but a schematic diagram. As a schematic diagram it shows not the geographic but the relative positions of stations along the lines, stations’ connective relations with each other and their fare zone locations.

This infographic has been commissioned by PS Translation to showcase their range of
translation services.

I also think this is a fantastic example of a infographic used for marketing purposes.  It’s not an outright advertisement, but it is certainly a related topic to a translation service done in a very appealing design style.

Thanks for the link James!

Friday
Sep032010

The 2010 Social Networking Map

 

The team at Flowtown.com designed the 2010 Social Networking Map as an update to the Map of Online Communities by xkcd.com in early 2007.  Social networking has certainly advanced in the last three years (even in the last three days!), so the update shows a lot of changes in geography.

It does seem a little premature to claim this is the map of social media for 2010 with five months left to go.  A lot can happen in five months (like the Apple PING service announced this week).

Wednesday
Sep012010

Subway Science: 500 Years of Great Scientists

Crispian Jago created this great subway map of the top scientists in the last 500 years.  Subway Science plots the science celebrities by discipline (subway track), connections where appropriate and the shaded rings in the background show the timeline by century (the outer ring is the 20th century).  Sir Isaac Newton crosses 5 lines…either a great multi-tasker or ADHD.

 

You can see that Crispian has tagged this as DRAFT version 0.37, and he already has a huge number of comments on his Science, Reason and Critical Thinking blog post.  I expect there will be revised versions in the future.

Where’s Sheldon Cooper?!?

Found on Bad Astronomy and Visual Loop

Tuesday
Jul272010

The Yahoo! Developer Network Metro Map

The Yahoo! Developer Network Metro Map is a subway map of the Yahoo! Developer Network of APIs and services by Jinho Jung.

Found on Social Media Graphics

Friday
Jul022010

The 2010 Internet Censorship Report infographic

 

From Antonio Lupetti at WoorkUp.com, The 2010 Internet Censorship Report looks at how many people in the world population are effected by government censorship.

It is one of the tools used by governments to filter out unwanted information and to prevent the spread through the World Wide Web. It is a phenomenon of staggering proportions that affects over 25% of the global population.

My suggestion for improvement is that I think the the white circles representing the countries should be sized in accordance the population numbers.

Thanks to Antonio for sending in the link.

Monday
Jun212010

Where Americans are Moving (interactive infographic)

From Jon Bruner at Forbes.com, Where Americans are Moving is an interactive map infographic that shows the migration both into and out of that county.  You’re not limited to the predefined cities that have buttons, but can choose any county in the country.  Even after zooming in, it can be hard to see the details because there are so many lines displayed.

More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

Based on IRS data, I wish the statistics were easier to see.  You can get access to the underlying data at data.gov; search for ‘migration’.

Who knew so many people were moving out of Hawaii?!?

Found on ChartPorn.com, FlowingData.com, and @JonBruner

Tuesday
Jun152010

Walt DisneyWorld's Huge Footprint

From Dana Fasano at the Orlando Sentinel comes Walt DisneyWorld’s Huge Footprint.  This area map showing how little of the land that Disney owns near Orlando has actually been developed.

Of Disney World’s more than 30,000 acres, less than one-fourth has been developed.  Another fourth has been set aside as a wilderness preserve.

Found on Six Revisions

Tuesday
May182010

Crude Awakening - Gulf Spill Infographic

This is a very comprehensive, detail-heavy infographic designed by Carol Zuber-Mallison at ZM Graphics for InfographicsWorld.com.  Including map data, a timeline, a few pie and bar charts, a schematic of the different fix scenarios and a visual of almost 4,000 squares.

“I usually do print work; this is my first piece specifically for social media.  It just kept getting bigger and bigger as things continued to get worse in the Gulf.

I built it in four frantic days.  There’s some things O would have done differently but when you’re working that fast you’re just putting stuff together with prayer and duct tape.  Design takes a back seat to trying to get the information right.

This is an ongoing news event so things are constantly changing and I hope to update it at least once a week.  (If you’ve found an error, please e-mail me so I can fix it.)”

— Carol Zuber-Mallison

Thanks to Justin Beegel from InfographicsWord.com for sending in the link!

Thursday
Apr222010

China's Global Investments - interactive map

 

Jon Bruner from Forbes.com has designed and posted an interactive timeline/map of the major investments China has made all over the world in the last five years.

When you first see the map, it’s an animated timeline that highlights which countries China invested in each month since March 2005.  The animation completes when it reaches December 2009, and then you can select a particular year by clicking on the total investment bars across the bottom or see the details behind any particular investment by mousing over one of the bubbles.  The bubble sizes represent the size of the investments.

Since 2005 Chinese firms and arms of the Chinese government have invested hundreds of billions of dollars in foreign companies and raw materials. Each dot on this map tracks one of those investments, with larger dots representing larger investments. Explore the map by rolling over and clicking on the dots and timeline.

Thanks Jon for the link!

Thursday
Apr222010

Follow the Money - infographic video

Follow the Money” is a video summarizing the results from the project by Northwestern University grad students Daniel Grady and Christian Thiemann.  Using data from the website Where’s George?, they have been able to track the movement of U.S. paper currency.  What can you learn from this?  That there are natural borders within the U.S. that don’t necessarily follow state borders, and it can also be used to predict the spread of disease because it maps movement of people within the U.S.

From Maria Popova on BrainPickings.org: This may sound like dry statistical uninterestingness, but the video visualization of the results is rather eye-opening, revealing how money — not state borders, not political maps, not ethnic clusters — is the real cartographer drawing our cultural geography.  The project was a winner at the 2009 Visualization Challenge sponsored by the National Science Foundation and AAA.

 

From Manuel Lima on VisualComplexity.com: Some places, such as Los Angeles, California, have many bills passing through it from across the nation, while others, such as Anderson County in Tennessee - Grady’s home - have bills circulating mainly within a more local neighborhood. Shown here are images from the video.  The data from the Where’s George? project is in fact so pertinent that is also being used by researchers to predict the spread of flu across the United States.

You can see the Northwest project site, which has a much more adademic title “Community Structure in Multi-Scale Transportation Networks”.

Rendered using Processing 1.0.6.  Found on VisualizingEconomics.com, VisualComplexity.com and Maria Popova has a good article on BrainPickings.org.