Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum
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Data Visualization and Infographic Design

Infographic Design

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Best Beer in America: 2009 Update!

Our friend, Mike Wirth, has released the 2009 Great American Beer Festival Medal Map, but it's much easier to call it the Best Beer in America Map!

Mike uses the data of the Great American Beer Festival medal winners from 1987-2008, and this year he has added some new infographics to help support the map.  If you live in Oklahoma or North Dakota, I hope you're drinking out-of-state beer!  I'm just saying.

I posted about his original poster here.  The infographic was published on the Lyke2Drink blog, and on Mike's own website.

Nice work Mike!


Cape Hatteras Lighthouse: The Move of the Millenium

Found on MagaMaps.com, I like the multiple elements included in this infographic.  Plus, I remember this lighthouse, and I can't believe they actually moved it!


Seven Deadly Sins Nationwide

A study from Kansas State University has plotted the prevalence of the Seven Deadly Sins across the U.S.  Follow the link to see all seven.

Geographers from Kansas State University did a study called "The Spatial Distribution of the Seven Deadly Sins within Nevada." They also looked at sins nationwide. 
Reported by the Las Vegas Sun, I found links this this on Twitter.


How Long Will It Last?

Good infographic from the New Scientist showing how many years we have left of our key natural resources.  Essentially these are basic bar and pie charts, but dressed up to make the overall graphic more compelling.  The message is still clear though, and the author gets his point across very strongly.

This comes from a 2007 article in the New Scientist called "Earth's Natural Wealth: an Audit" that include two more infographics as well.  The first is a map of where in the world are these natural resources are.

The next is a bubble graphic showing the scale of how much of each resource an average American will consume during their lifetime.

The Source listed on the first infographic: Armin Reller, University of Augsburg, Tom Graedel, Yale University

Found on FlowingData.com and numerous Twitter references.  Thanks Nathan.


Where's The Beer? (U.S. Breweries per Capita)

Found on SloshSpot.com, a U.S. map showing breweries per capita by state.  Drink up!


Build Your Own Infographic World Map

Why is another world popoulation map website Cool?  Because on GunnMap, by Gunn Interactive, you can load your own data.   There are a few example data sets preloaded like population, GDP growth, military spending and birth rate, but the best part is that you can paste in your own data to create a custom world map.

Here's a quick demo video from Arthur Gunn on how to use the site by pasting in data from the CIA website to create a new map:

GunnMap demo from Arthur Gunn on Vimeo.

Thanks Paul for the link!


SXSW Twitter Visualizer from Pepsi

The 2009 SXSW PepsiCo Zeitgeist Twitter Visualizer (long name isn't it?) was a great experiment during the 5-day South By Southwest symposium/conference/party in Austin, TX.  Developed by Slash7, the site contains a number of dufferent visualizations using the Twitter APIs.

These real-time visualizations were able to capture only Tweets about the event using the hash-tag #SXSW and highlight the popular topics and show where people were Twittering on a map.  PepsiCo has a bigger site with some additional content at http://pepsico.com/sxsw

Found on Information Aesthetics and of course, Twitter.


Bad News for Newspapers

Infographic from the NY Times (I know, ironic isn't it?) that shows the drop in circulation of major newspapers across the U.S.
Heavy debt has dragged several newspaper companies into bankruptcy. The industry’s dwindling revenues have forced some money-losing papers to close, and papers that are for sale are having trouble finding buyers. Experts say that before long, a major American city could be left without a daily paper. (Related Article)
Found on Twitter from @edial


TimeSpace - World

From The Washington Post, TimeSpace-World is an experiment in a visual way to see news stories from around the world.  You can specify the time period during a day that you want to see with the slider, and then click the stories to zoom into the map.  You can also enter search terms to view a smaller set of relevant stories.

TimeSpace is an interactive map that allows you to navigate articles, photos, video and commentary from around the globe. Discover news hot-spots where coverage is clustered. Use the timeline to illustrate peaks in coverage, and customize your news searches to a particular day or specific hour. (Many Washington Post stories appear at midnight; others are published throughout the day as news happens). Click the ? In the upper right for help.

 Link found from Mitul69 on Twitter


Taking the Train

It's not a complicated one, but I like Good Magazine's summary of the biggest train systems in the world (top 5 U.S. cities and top 5 foreign cities).  The silhouettes represent the daily rides in the city, and the length of the train shows how many miles that system covers.  To the right is a quick map of each city's subway system and some statistics about their subway system.

Thanks Li, for sending in the link!