About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

 

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Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Entries in history (216)

Monday
Oct212013

Cars of the Silver Screen

Cars of the Silver Screen infographic

Cars of the Silver Screen infographic by moneysupermarket.com.

Looking for car insurance can be a time consuming and expensive business. However, if you were trying to insure some of these film treasures you might expect a few extra zeros on the end of your premium! From the Ford Mercury that James Dean famously drove in his last film, Rebel Without a Cause, to the brand new Audi R8 e-tron that Tony Stark drives in Iron Man 3, cars have played a massive part in iconic film history.

However, it is not always the ultra-cool cars that steal the limelight in blockbuster movies. Quite often the most memorable cars are the most unlikely. Take, for instance the Cadillac ‘Ecto-1’ that the Ghostbusters used to get around the busy New York streets, or the Volkswagen Beetle that got into so many scrapes in the Herbie movies.

To celebrate these unlikely heroes, we’ve taken a look at the timeline of great cars of the silver screen.

Interesting topic choice for Money Super Market.  For successful infographics, choosing a relevant topic with related keywords and search criteria can make a big difference.  Good link bait brings views and links from readers that are interested in the topic, and ideally even raises awareness with potential customers.

I’d like to hear your opinion.  Is this infographic about cars from movies relevant to a site that helps people find car insurance?  Leave your thoughts in the comments.

Thanks Paul for sending in the link!

Monday
Sep302013

10 Things You Probably Didn't Know About the iPhone

10 Things You Probably Didn't Know About the iPhone infographic

10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About the iPhone from NextWorth takes a look at some of the amazing stats and facts about Apple’s flagship product.

Designed by InfoNewt, this infographic is a good case study in topic selection and release timing.  September was a month full of Apple iPhone news and hysteria surrounding the release of the new iPhone 5S, the iPhone 5C and the major upgrade to iOS 7.  There were a bunch of infographics released about the rumors surrounding the new phones, but as soon as the new iPhones were officially announced all of the rumor designs became obsolete.

The topic choice and data visualized in this design has a much longer online lifespan.  The content about the history and growth of the iPhone will be relevant for at least a year, maybe longer.  The infographic will continue to drive traffic and links to the NextWorth site.

Monday
Sep302013

15 Years of Google Search

15 Years of Google Search timeline infographic

Last week, Google celebrated its 15th year, and posted the Google Search Timeline to help remember how far we have come in that time.

Google Search is turning 15. Remember what it was like to search in 1998? You’d sit down and boot up your bulky computer, dial up on your squawky modem, type in some keywords, and get 10 blue links to websites that had those words. It seemed like magic (and it was way way faster than card catalogs and microfiche!).

The world has changed so much since then: billions of people have come online, the web has grown exponentially, and now you can ask any question on the powerful little device in your pocket. You can explore the world with the Knowledge Graph, ask questions aloud with voice search, and get info before you even need to ask with Google Now.

I love the visual design, with icons and minimal text in the design to show all of the major milestones.  

I don’t understand the increasing area chart across the bottom though.  It isn’t representing any data, and each step up coincides with one of the major advancements across the top.  It’s visual, but it doesn’t have any meaning.  You would think it could show the growing total number of searches or stock price or amount of data processed.

Found on TechCrunch


Wednesday
Sep042013

The Guide to Star Trek Uniforms

The Guide to Star Trek Uniforms infographic

The Gude to Star Trek Uniforms infographic from Costume Supercenter. Make sure you know what uniform your wearing!

When the original Star Trek television series started, male and female officers wore similar outfits. The male Star Trek uniforms consisted of black pants, black boots and a velour shirt with the symbol on the left side. Females wore the same type of shirt, with black boots and tights, and a black skirt, although in some cases they wore black pants. The color of shirt worn identified the branch the crew member belonged to. Those in green shirts worked for command personnel, while beige stood for operations, and blue was for medical personnel only. The velour shirts were changed to nylon shirts starting in the third season. You can find many of the Star Trek Costumes here.

Don’t be the red-shirted ensign!

The footer of the design should include the copyright information and the URL to the original infographic landing page so readers can see the full-size infographic.  The Costume Supercenter logo should also be somewhere on the design to connect the infographic to the publishing company.

Found on Visual.ly

Tuesday
Aug202013

The History of Music Media - From Vinyl To Bitstreams

The History of Music Media infographic

A creative timeline view of The History of: Music Media infographic from Indigo Boom. The colors track the popularity of each new and old source of music media through the years. From left to right it goes 0% popular to 100% popular. 

Selling music as recordings first became possible in 1877 with the introduction of the phonograph cylinder. Since then media formats have developed and radically changed the way we listen, and recently even where we can listen to music. We have looked at the last 30 years of music format development and popularity in the infographic below.

Beautiful, colorful design. This is a vertical stacked area chart covering the last 30+ years of music sales. You can see that in 1980 (where the chart begins) vinyl was already in decline. CDs have had a big run, but downloads are obviously growing to become the new dominant method to get music.

I like that the design tells one story really well, and doesn’t get into a whole bunch of extra data points. It’s a simple, clear story to the readers who can understand the content quickly and then move on.  

The source listing of The RIAA is too vague.  Source listings should include a link to the specific data so others can examine the original dataset if they wish.  I went to the RIAA site, and it appears that they are selling this information in a report. Publishing the data publicly in an infographic may be a violation of the terms of service or copyright of the report, but I can’t tell because I can’t determine where the specific data originated.

The URL to the infographic landing page should be included in the footer of the design so readers can find the original when they come across a smaller version posted on another site.  Not all sites are good about linking back to the original.

Thanks to Bogdan for sending in the link!

Monday
Jul292013

Apple's Infographic Timeline Poster

Apple Celebrates 5 years of the App Store infographic timeline poster

Apple just released the infographic timeline poster, Apple Celebrates 5 Years of the App Store.  Copies of this poster were sent to various members of the press.  The above photo is from Lauren Goode from All Things D.

If anyone has a copy they don’t want, I would love to get a copy!

Sadly, no high-resolution versions of the poster are available online, but the data is available to view from within the iTunes Store.  You can see the images, icons and events, but they aren’t laid out like the poster timeline.  You can view the events in iTunes by following this link.

Found on All Things D 

Tuesday
Jul092013

What Is Autism?

What Is Autism? from Global Medical Education is a long, informational infographic that covers the symptons, signs, types, treatments and history of diagnosing autism.

Autism Spectrum Disorder is very common. About 1 in 50 school aged children had parent reported ASD in 2011-2012. There have been changes in DSM-5 with the category of Autism Spectrum Disorder being introduced  which includes Autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder, Rett’s disorder and Pervasive Developmental Disorder-NOS from DSM-IV. Researchers have studied several important questions in this disorder.

This is a big design with a bunch of good information.  However, I think it’s way too much text for an infographic.  Infographics should make information easier to understand, and most readers won’t stick around to read this much information.  In fact, many readers won’t read any of the information because that much text is intimidating and implies an investment of time and attention by the reader.

The information is fantastic, and should have been broken up into multiple infographics to cover the different topics.  This would make the information easier to digest, and would also spread out links and views to the hosting site over a longer period of time.

Thanks to David for sending in the link!

 

 

Friday
Jun282013

Ba-tee-nga: Sheldon Cooper Presents Fun With Tees

Bah-tee-nga: Sheldon Cooper Presents Fun With Tees infographic

Ba-tee-nga: Sheldon Cooper Presents Fun With Tees infographic from RIPT Apparel shows every t-shirt that Sheldon Cooper from Big Bang Theory wore each episode of every season.

We have all seen The Big Bang Theory, and its awesome cast of nerds. But did you ever wonder about Sheldon’s graphic tees and how many different ones there actually were? This weeks infographic takes a look at the many shirts of Sheldon Cooper titled “Ba-TEE-nga: Sheldon Cooper Presents Fun With Tees”. Much like RIPT Apparel’s graphic tees, this is a mash-up of the famous saying Sheldon made popular; “Bazinga”, coupled with his awesome web show – “Sheldon Cooper Presents Fun With Flags”. The graphic shows all of Sheldon’s shirts from the pilot episode through season 6 episode 7. Yeh that’s a ton of Tees!

An ideal topic for an infographic!  Can you imagine how boring this would have been as a text list in a blog post?!? 

Thanks to Bill for submitting the link via Twitter!  Bazinga!

Thursday
Jun132013

Visualizing International Criminal Tribunals


Visualizing International Criminal Tribunals

Very cool report that uses data visualization and infographics design to communicate complex information about International Criminal Tribunals from the Leitner Center for International Law and Justice at Fordham Law School, New York City.

The Leitner Center launches a new report, “International Criminal Tribunals: A Visual Overview,” providing an introduction to the work of the international tribunals and the conflicts which led to their establishment. Despite widespread interest in these tribunals and the view that they represent a definitive advance of international law and justice, there is also much confusion and misconception about their work. This new 90-page report, providing analysis and information through written summaries and detailed visualizations, aims to make the work of the courts more accessible to the general public and legal professionals alike.

Media attention dedicated to the work of the tribunals is too often superficial, and tends to confuse key distinctions between them; more informed scholarship, on the other hand, is largely confined to specialty publications, remaining inaccessible to most. “International Criminal Tribunals: A Visual Overview,” aims to provide well-researched and accessible information for anyone wishing to more fully understand these issues. This will help democratize engagement with these courts, which are tasked with delivering justice for victims of some of the world’s worst atrocities. Examples of the visual graphics in the report are included below.

 

Awesome use of different styles of data visualization to summarize the often-complex information behind these tribunals.  Timelines, maps, area charts, polar grids, rose diagrams and treemaps.  The Case-by-Case timeline are fascinating.

The complete report is publicly available as a PDF for download.

I asked Daniel McLaughlin a few questions about the development and design of the report:

Cool Infographics: What software, websites or tools did you use to create the visualizations?

Daniel: We used Adobe Illustrator and InDesign to create the visuals for the report.

Cool Infographics: Did you create the report yourself, or use a design team?

Daniel: As a lawyer working with law students on this project, I was dependent on graphic and information design volunteers to create the visuals. The students and I carried out all the substantive research and then worked with these volunteers to figure out how best to translate it visually. Paula Airth of www.bepeculiar.com, in particular, was instrumental in bringing the project to life.

Cool Infographics: How long did the report take to design and put together?

Daniel: The report started out as a short (8-9 page) publication on the work of the international criminal tribunals. It grew into the present 90 page version as we continued to accumulate new data and the graphic/information design volunteers continued to create new graphics. All told, the research took around 4 months and the creation of the visuals/layout took another 5 months or so.

Cool Infographics: How has the use of data visualization design and social media impacted your marketing?

Daniel: The goal of this publication was to make the work of the international criminal tribunals more accessible to lawyers and non-lawyers alike. As indicated in the publication,

“There is wide awareness, though little true understanding, of the work of the international criminal tribunals.  International prosecutions of high-ranking civilian and military leaders, including former heads of state, on charges of crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide, represent for many the ultimate condemnation of these individuals’ past actions and a measure of their fall from power. Yet, despite the tribunals’ grasp on the popular imagination, they are the subject of significant misconceptions and confusion. Much of the media coverage dedicated to their work remains superficial, at best, and largely muddles over key distinctions between various tribunals, past and present. Conversely, the more informed scholarship is largely confined to specialty publications that remain inaccessible to most. In truth, many lawyers and non-lawyers alike lack a clear understanding of the role and functioning of these increasingly-pivotal international institutions.  This publication seeks to redress this knowledge gap by providing well-researched and accessible information for those wishing to more fully understand the international criminal tribunals and the conflicts over which they have jurisdiction. An informed public is an engaged public - and the issues that animate these tribunals, including delivering justice for victims of some of the world’s worst atrocities, are too significant to be discussed solely by a small cadre of international criminal law specialists.

Notably, this publication was created in partnership with graphic and information designers so as to reach a broader public. The designers’ visualizations present information regarding the tribunals and their underlying conflicts in a direct and accessible manner to a wide range of viewers, including those without a legal background. Beyond this democratizing function, information visualization also serves to reveal important data and trends that might otherwise go unnoticed in a more conventional format. Ideally, the following information, which is current as of January 2013, would be integrated into a continually updated interactive webportal dedicated to engaging a global public on issues of international justice.

In sum, this publication aims to facilitate a broader discussion of the international criminal tribunals’ notable accomplishments, as well as ongoing shortcomings.”

 

Thanks to Daniel McLaughlin for sending in the link!

Monday
Jun032013

The History of NFL Logo Designs

The History of NFL Logo Designs infographic

Football is extremely popular in the United States. People pick sides and cheer on their teams loyaly.  The History of NFL Logo Designs infographic posted on Visual.ly tells the story of each football team’s logo through the years.

In Infographics below we are going to show you some of the interesting logo design changes across the (NFL) community with their territory maps.

Cool design that shows visual evolution of various NFL logos.

Thanks to Rachael for sending in the link!