About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

 

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Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Entries in history (216)

Friday
Oct222010

Critical Thinkers Through History

From ThinkWatson.com, Critical Thinkers Through History is a nice visual timeline that show photos or images of some of the greatest critical thinkers in human history.

What do Sigmund Freud, Henry Ford, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Marie Curie have in common? They were great critical thinkers that all made their mark in history! Here’s a chart of some of the top critical thinkers through history. It’s not comprehensive by any means, but see if you agree!

Who else should be on the list?

I think the timeline should go back farther in time, although photos would be a problem.  Sun Tzu, Aristotle, Galileo, etc.

Thanks to Matt for sending in the link!

Tuesday
Oct052010

The Darwinian Evolution of Microsoft Windows

 

This is a cool infographic timeline, showing the Darwinian Evolution of Microsoft Windows from version 1.0 in 1985 up through the current Windows 7 in 2009.  Although it makes for a really tall infographic, I love seeing the visuals of the startup screens and the desktops.

Art is credited to Richard Cavolo, and the project is from TestKing.com (even though I can find no mention of it on their site).  It was posted on BitsandPieces.us

Wednesday
Sep292010

The World Without Apple

 

The World Without Apple, from Infographic Labs is a great design.  The main feature combines the history of Apple’s products in a timeline with its stock prices and new product introduction prices.  Also included are some statistics about the app store and all of the different aspects to Apple’s business.

The AppleGazette team asked us to analyse the complete product timeline and stock value of the Cupertino based company. The result is another stunning graphic, first published at AppleGazette.

 

Wednesday
Sep012010

Subway Science: 500 Years of Great Scientists

Crispian Jago created this great subway map of the top scientists in the last 500 years.  Subway Science plots the science celebrities by discipline (subway track), connections where appropriate and the shaded rings in the background show the timeline by century (the outer ring is the 20th century).  Sir Isaac Newton crosses 5 lines…either a great multi-tasker or ADHD.

 

You can see that Crispian has tagged this as DRAFT version 0.37, and he already has a huge number of comments on his Science, Reason and Critical Thinking blog post.  I expect there will be revised versions in the future.

Where’s Sheldon Cooper?!?

Found on Bad Astronomy and Visual Loop

Friday
Jun252010

Timeline for Planet of the Apes

Created by Phil Laver, the Planet of the Apes Timeline of Events covers events across all five of the movies.

The facts and dates recorded here are only those that are generally accepted by POTA statisticians.  No reference to the comics or graphic novels have been given as these follow a substantially alternative timeline.  Tim Burton’s POTA narrative has been similarly ignored.

Phil also had his timeline infographic displayed during an exhibition, you can see a couple photos here.

Thursday
Jun242010

Google's History of Communication Infographic

Google posted this infographic, A Modern History of Human Communication, on the Official Google Mobile Blog as part of their opening up the Google Voice service to everyone.  It’s no longer an invite-only service.

To put things in context, we created this infographic to visualize some recent history of human communication and how Google Voice uses the web to help people communicate in more ways than ever before (click the image for a larger version):

 

Thursday
Jun102010

A Visual History of the American Presidency - new infographic poster

 

Timeplots has released their second infographic poster, A Visual History of the American Presidency.  Timeplots was launched by Nathaniel Pearlman and Frank Hamilton in December 2009 with the release of the Visual History of the Supreme Court infographic poster, which is now hanging in many schools, law practices and political offices.

This large-scale print is like nothing else available on the history of the American presidency. It places each president in historical context, visualizing a remarkable range of political, social, and economic measures to succinctly tell the story of the presidency. Narratives are displayed within the larger context of American political history by aggregating and annotating hard data on population, presidential elections, Congress, the Supreme Court, the Cabinet, the U.S. economy, and the federal budget and debt. The Timeplot provides a new lens into American political history; it is not intended to be absorbed at a glance, but rather to be visited and revisited over time.

 

 

A beautiful poster, and a very impressive infographic design.  Very Tufte-like in its infographic design, which is no surprise since Nathaniel was a student of Edward Tufte at Yale.  

At its heart, this is a fantastic mix of timelines.  Additionally, the poster is an incredibly detailed infographic that includes things like the time period of each President, the balance of Congress during each term, approval ratings, population growth, the U.S. GDP, the Federal Budget, unemployment, election cartograms and statistics, a biography of each President’s political history and so much more.

 

 

The high-resolution infographic is available on the Timeplots site using Zoomify, but it really shines as the printed poster.  You can order the printed 32”x48” poster from the Timeplots.com site for $45, or a smaller 24”x36” version for $30. 

 

 

Great job to the entire team at Timeplots!  Later today, I’ll post a behind-the-scenes interview with Nathaniel.

Friday
May282010

The Evolution of the Television - infographic timeline

The Evolution of the Television looks at the last 84 years of TV’s history.  Brought to us from the Sterling Satellite blog.

Did you know it took 13 years for television to reach 50 million users? TV has evolved from the time it started with just a few programs airing each day into 24/7 news and hundreds of stations to choose from.

People didn’t immediately embrace the new technology though. 10 years after its debut in 1936, the head of 20th Century Fox Darryl F. Zanuck (seeing TV as a competitor to movies) famous last words were predicting it would not catch on.  He said he thought “People will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night.”

But they have not.

Thanks to @Matt_Siltala for the link!

Tuesday
Apr132010

An Infographic Evolution of the Bra

This two-panel infographic on the Evolution of the Modern Bra was designed by Suzi Slavik for an assignment in her information graphics class at Ohio State University.

The first panel is devoted to social influences, industry leaders, and shifts in fashionable silhouettes. The second panel discusses historical milestones, significant fabrics used, and the bra fitting procedure.

The assignment was to choose any sequence, cycle, or evolution and represent it graphically. The information was to be presented in two separate panels that were related but could also function independently of one another.

Thanks to Matt for the link!

Tuesday
Mar092010

The Writing on the Wall

From an article in New Scientist titled “The writing on the cave wall”, this infographic shows that many symbols and figures used in cave-wall paintings have similar forms.

What emerged was startling: 26 signs, all drawn in the same style, appeared again and again at numerous sites (see illustration). Admittedly, some of the symbols are pretty basic, like straight lines, circles and triangles, but the fact that many of the more complex designs also appeared in several places hinted to von Petzinger and Nowell that they were meaningful - perhaps even the seeds of written communication.

A group of 26 symbols crops up at Stone Age sites throughout the world – are these the origin of the written word?

Found on Chart Porn