Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

DFW DataViz Meetup

Join the Meetup Group if you’re in the Dallas/Fort Worth area!

Search the Cool Infographics site

Custom Search

 

Subscriptions:

 

Feedburner

The Cool Infographics® Gallery:

How to add the
Cool Infographics button to your:

Cool Infographics iOS icon

- iPhone
- iPad
- iPod Touch

 

Read on Flipboard for iPad and iPhone

Featured in the Tech & Science category

Flipboard icon

Twitter Feed
From the Bookstore

Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Entries in Google (25)

Wednesday
Sep242014

How To Be a Google Power User

How To Be a Google Power User infographic

Sometimes, no matter how you word your question, Google’s search engine’s results will not come up with what you are looking for. How To Be a Google Power User infographic from Who is Hosting This? tackles the Google search engine problem with a few tips and tricks to help you find the answers to the questions you are seeking.

It’s a familiar frustration for most of us: You type your precise, specific search terms into Google, and expect to find what you need on the first page.

Instead, you’re faced with millions of search results, and the first few links are so off-the-wall unrelated you wonder if you mistyped something.

But your search terms are correct, so why doesn’t Google know what you’re looking for? And how are you supposed to narrow down the millions of irrelevant results?

Luckily, Google has quite a few hidden tips and tricks for searching that will help you quickly find exactly the results you’re looking for.

Just by learning a few formatting and punctuation tricks, you can tell Google how your search terms are related, or exclude certain words or phrases. You can also narrow down your search with criteria like location or pricing, or use Google to search within a single website.

If you’re still not getting the results you need, Google has several other little-known features that can widen your search. Webmasters can easily find images for their websites and blogs with Google Images, and researchers need only visit Google Books or Google Scholar to search through print publications and research papers in any field.

Faster and more accurate searches aren’t the only benefit to becoming a Google power user. Google also has a few hidden functions you can unlock with the right search query, including calculations and conversions, stock quotes and sports scores, and film showings and flight statuses. With the right search, you can get immediate results telling you the current weather and today’s sunrise and sunset times, or quickly look up the definition of a word and get a translation into one of dozens of available languages.

With the time you save as a Google power user, you’ll even be able to fit in a game of Atari Breakout on Google Images. Just follow the steps int he infographic to find out how!

This is a great instructional, how-to infographic design. It’s informative, without making any kind of hard sales pitch for a companies products or services, and that usually leads to more sharing activity.  It would help to have the URL to the original infographic landing page in the footer.

The color scheme is spot-on with Google as the topic, and the sections are easy for readers to follow with minimal text. For example, the design shows you how to use the Search Operators using an example without a lengthy text explanation.

Found on Digital Information World and State of Digital

Monday
Mar242014

How Google Glass Works

How Google Glass Works infographic

The Google Glass phenomenon has gotten a ton of coverage from the tech press, but how does it work? Creator Martin Missfeldt explains the inner workings in his How Google Glass Works infographic.

How does it work, Google’s new Glass? Why can you see with it a sharp image-layer? How does the image overlay the image of reality? The following infographic illustrates the optical principle - very simple and easy to understand.

Google Glass is a technical masterpiece. It combines numerous functions and features in a very small unit. In addition to phone and camera (photo, video), it offers Internet connection, including GPS.

The core feature of Google Glass is a visual layer that is placed over the reality (“augmented reality”). This layer opens a door to amazing new possibilities. But how does it work? In the Google Glass contains a mini-projector, which projected the layer via a clever, semi-transparent prism directly on the retina in the eye. Because of this the image, even though it is so close to the eye, is sharp and clear. You can move the front part of the Google Glass easily to optimize the focus.

This informative infographic is a great how-to explanation of the science and technology built into Google Glass.  Illustrations and images are used in this design to tell the story instead of data visualizations.

A German version of the infographic was also published.

Found on http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/a-great-visual-guide-on-how-google.html

 

Wednesday
Mar052014

Hungry Tech Giants

Hungry Tech Giants Interactive Infographic

Hungry Tech Giants is a cool infographic from Simply Business that is both zoomable and interactive!  To put them into context, the design visualizes 15 years of tech company acquisitions by Apple, Google, Yahoo, Amazon, And Facebook.

2013 was a busy year for tech acquisitions.

With competition in the tech space heating up, Apple, Amazon, Google, Yahoo, and Facebook collectively executed 65 acquisitions in 2013 alone.

Yahoo was the biggest acquirer of 2013, buying a total of 25 companies following the hiring of its new CEO, Marissa Meyer.

Although Meyer is best known for her acquisition of Tumblr, the majority of her deals have bought engineering talent in an effort to build Yahoo as a serious challenger to Google.

Apple also had their biggest ever year for acquisitions in 2013, with ten purchases in total.

To see all of the acquisitions in detail, please visit our interactive microsite.

Each acquisition is appropriately placed on the timeline, and shown as a circle sized to match the total acquisition price.  Solid circles shown known prices, and open circles are not sized because the acquisition amount was never released publicly.  The circles are also color-coded to represent the different categories.

The interactivity allows you to select which categories to show, and when you hover over any particular acquisition, the acquired company name is shown with a link to the press release or news story announcing the acquisition.

The zooming controls allow you to adjust the date range shown, which helps identify many of the overlapping circles.  Clicking on the company logos on the left also brings up the data table which shows all of the known values, dates and includes the links to the press releases.  A very good way to establish credibility and make your data sources transparent.

The overall design is meant to be very detailed and allow the audience to dig in and explore the data.  At the macro level, the infographic clearly puts Facebook’s $19B acquisition of WhatsApp into context as the largest tech acquisition of all time!

Found on TechCrunch and Cult of Mac!

Monday
Dec092013

Google’s 200 Ranking Factors

Google’s 200 Ranking Factors infographic

Google’s 200 Ranking Factors is a very detailed list of the known 200 aspects that Google considers in their ranking formulas.  The overall length of the infographic is the major visual feature that catches your attention, and communicates a clear message about Google’s immensely complicated algorithm and how difficult SEO can be.  The second level of of the design is the actual details about each and every one of those ranking factors that the audience can read if they want specific information.

Google has confirmed that they use approximately 200 ranking signals in their algorithm. However, they’ve never publicly listed them all. While this infographic is by no means official, it aggregates the best information we have about how Google ranks pages and websites.

The infographic was published on Entrepreneur.com, designed by Single Grain and based on information collected and published by Backlinko.

Found on Holy Kaw! and Search Engine Journal

Wednesday
Nov132013

How to Setup Google Authorship in 6 Minutes

How to Setup Google Authorship in 6 Minutes infographic

How to Setup Google Authorship in 6 Minutes is simple, clear, focused design from Brafton.

Google Authorship helps brand publishers personalize the custom content they post to their websites. Studies show that including an author’s byline and headshot in search engine results pages (SERPs) increases clicks and may eventually improve PageRank. 

Brafton’s “Content marketing, meet Authorship” resource outlines everything a savvy marketer must know to benefit from Google technology, and our accompanying infographic makes it even easier to setup Authorship on a given site. (Our downloadable resource includes a print-friendly version of this graphic!) Follow these six steps (in about six minutes) to be on your way to publishing online content using Google Authorship. Don’t forget to read our related blog: Why It’s Time to Embrace Authorship, and download our free resource.

This infographic design keeps it simple for readers by telling one short story really well.

Knowing that the PNG image file of the infographic will be shared on other sites, the design should have included the Brafton logo, a copyright statement, and the URL for readers to follow to find the original, full-size version of the infographic.  Not all bloggers are good about linking back to the original landing page.

Monday
Oct072013

The Perks of Working at Google, Facebook, Twitter and More

The Perks of Working at Google, Facebook, Twitter and More infographic

When you get on your computer and pull up Google or Facebook, do you ever wonder about the people that make the site run? Resumebear put together an infographic for Mashable called The Perks of Working at Google, Facebook, Twitter, and More to share information like “Amenities in the Office” or “Medical and Retirement Benefits”. After reading about these jobs, you might decide to apply there yourself! 

It’s no secret that Silicon Valley has a problem finding the talent it needs to fill all the high-tech jobs available in the region. The area expects jobs in information and communications technologies to grow 15 percent during the next two years, Menlo Park Patch reports.

The trick for many employers is how to attract — and keep — the best talent in the field. Beyond handsome salaries, many tech firms also lavish their workers with benefits, leading to some unique and even quirky offerings.

Such corporate perks can be as simple (and routine) as Facebook’s discounted gym memberships or the onsite gyms at search-engine giant Google and Gaia Online, an animation-themed social networking site.

Great use of icons and illustrations to show a comparison between company benefits!

Found on mashable.com!

Wednesday
Oct022013

Measuring Google AdWords Conversions

Measuring AdWords Conversions in a Multi-Screen World infographic

Google AdWords released some fantastic stats about cross-device conversions on their Inside AdWords blog, and included the infographic Measuring AdWords Conversions in a Multi-Screen World to help communicate some of the information.

Estimated cross-device conversions will begin rolling out globally to all AdWords advertisers starting today and continuing over the next few weeks. To see these new statistics, you’ll need AdWords conversion tracking and a sufficient volume of conversions on which to base a reliable estimate.

In the last few months, we’ve analyzed data across thousands of AdWords advertisers to learn more about cross-device conversion patterns.

More results from other verticals can be seen below.

The visual diagram helps readers understand the information by narrowing down the scope of the data; clearly identifying it as only a portion of the Estimated Total Conversions.   However, they made one of the biggest design mistakes.  Big fonts are not data visualizations!   Making the percentage numbers big doesn’t put these values into context for the readers and doesn’t make the data any easier to understand.

Found on the D/FW SEM Facebook feed.

Monday
Sep302013

15 Years of Google Search

15 Years of Google Search timeline infographic

Last week, Google celebrated its 15th year, and posted the Google Search Timeline to help remember how far we have come in that time.

Google Search is turning 15. Remember what it was like to search in 1998? You’d sit down and boot up your bulky computer, dial up on your squawky modem, type in some keywords, and get 10 blue links to websites that had those words. It seemed like magic (and it was way way faster than card catalogs and microfiche!).

The world has changed so much since then: billions of people have come online, the web has grown exponentially, and now you can ask any question on the powerful little device in your pocket. You can explore the world with the Knowledge Graph, ask questions aloud with voice search, and get info before you even need to ask with Google Now.

I love the visual design, with icons and minimal text in the design to show all of the major milestones.  

I don’t understand the increasing area chart across the bottom though.  It isn’t representing any data, and each step up coincides with one of the major advancements across the top.  It’s visual, but it doesn’t have any meaning.  You would think it could show the growing total number of searches or stock price or amount of data processed.

Found on TechCrunch


Friday
Jul122013

Battle of the (Social) Sexes

Battle of the (Social) Sexes infographic

The Battle of the (Social) Sexes infographic from InternetServiceProviders.org explores some of the demographic data behind social media.

You’ve no doubt heard the old, oft-quoted adage, “men are from Mars, women are from Venus,” used to denote the fact that men and women may not always see completely eye to eye. While this light-hearted statement isn’t taken literally, when it comes to the virtual world of Internet interactions, similar sentiments may be formed surrounding the different ways men and women use social networking. While the majority of adults in the US are plugged into some sort of social media outlet, not all of them are used in equal measure, and not all of them are used by both genders equally. For instance, the average Google+ user spend just three minutes per month on the network, while the average Facebook user will spend 405 minutes per month updating statuses, posting pictures, and checking out others’ profiles. So what can be learned about men and women in the world of the web? As is turns out, men and women tend to dominate very different social media networks. The following infographic takes a look at some of the differences between male and female-dominated social media sites: How many users each one has, as well as how they interact.

There’s so really good data they have compiled in here, and most of the data visualizations are easy to understand.  I would not have expected to see that Twitter has 40 million more female users each month.

There are a handful of minor tweaks that would help improve the design:

  • The salmon/orange/peach color for women is unexpected compared to the traditional pink.
  • Go ahead and use the official Twitter and Facebook icons.  No need to design their own.
  • The pie slices for time spent would work much better with colors that are more distinct.  The different shades of gray are very hard to differentiate.
  • For the pie charts, the text label should be placed next to the pie slice its describing, instead of the opposite side as shown in this design.  Flipping the pie charts horizontally would fix that easily.

I appreciate the clear Creative Commons license in the footer, but the URL to the original infographic lansing page is missing.  Since the infographic image file is shared by itself, the URL always helps readers to find the original.

Found on Ragan’s PR Daily

 

Tuesday
Apr022013

Social Network Overload

Social Network Overload infographic

How often have you checked your social media accounts today? Feeling unplugged is a problem for many people.  Social Network Overload from mylife.com talks about how people are addicted to social media, and what they rather do than give up their Internet lifeline. 

Afraid you’re missing something important on your email, Facebook, Twitter, or other accounts? You are not alone. Two out of three people feel the same way. In the same survey, three out of five people wished there was a solution to monitor their various communication options.

Here’s an interesting infographic based on a survey by Harris which illustrates a growing trend—social media overload

The isometric illustrations of people and the data visualizations are fun, and the light-hearted data makes this one appealing to share.  The design is missing the URL to the infographic landing page, so that readers can find the original when they see thie infographic posted on other sites.

Found on The Undercover Recruiter and Visual Loop.