Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum
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Data Visualization and Infographic Design

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Entries in design (466)


VizThink 2009

So VizThink Europe was this last weekend, and I came across this infographic ad in Fast Company magazine.  The next VizThink in the U.S. is coming up quickly.  February 22-25 in San Jose, CA.

Again, my friends at VizThink have created a discount code that I can offer to the readers of Cool Infographics!  Use the code BCRK01 to get $100 off of the standard registration price!

Special thanks to Ryan and the gang at VizThink!

$100 Off regular admission



Watercube, The Book

Watercube, is a new book by Ethel Baraona Pohl.  The book is about the National Aquatics Centre built in Beijing for the 2008 Olympics, and has some cool infographics inside.  Some of the graphics were contributed by architect César Reyes Nájera.  A review of the book can be found here on www.v2com.biz
WATERCUBE: The Book is a complete monographic publication about the National Swimming Center for the Beijing Olympics 2008. With an exhaustive description about the Watercube we present a detailed study of the project. The book makes an holistic approach to the project that starts with a brief description of urban and social changes that China has been experienced in the last decade. These facts have encouraged the construction boom that made possible these kind of projects occur in cities like Beijing.

This page compared the amount of steel used to built the Watercube to some of the most well known buildings around the world.
This page shows a comparison to the same set of buildings around the world, but shows the tons of CO2 produced due to the steel used in their construction.

This page is one of the years of the timeline leading up to the construction of the Watercube.

Here you can buy Watercube, by Ethel Baraona Pohl, on Amazon.com.

Special thanks to Ethel for sharing the images from her book, and allowing me to post them on Cool Infographics!


Vampire Energy infographic video & chart

From GOOD magazine, they created an infographic video about Vampire Energy, all of the energy used by electronics in your house while you are not actively using them.  The chart itself from the magazine is fairly simple chart, but I really like it.  It's effective getting the message across with simple graphics.


The influence of Josef Müller-Brockmann Typography

Very cool infographic showing the the influence of Josef Müller-Brockmann.  By Quentin Delobel, it's on his site www.quentindelobel.com.
Josef Müller-Brockmann was a Swiss graphic designer and teacher, mostly recognised for his simple designs and his clean use of typography, notably Helvetica.  This visualization is the result of a personal web research about Josef Müller-Brockmann and the international typographical style. It contains 3 key elements: (1) the research of information on the web, (2) chronological information on Josef Muller-Brockmann's life and links to the last part, and finally the last part (3) is composed of a critical article based on information found online. The project is in french.
Thanks to Filipe for sending in the link!


Points Of View

This is a new t-shirt from Despair.com.  If you're not familiar with Despair, they are the opposite of Successories, the company that produces motivational posters.  I'm a big fan of their humor, and I loved the new shirt design.


Sony Walkman advertising

This may cross the lines between infographics, advertising and art, but I really liked these advertising posters.  They're real subway maps of New York, London and Sydney, with a little artistic twist to add the ear buds.


I found these on Ad Goodness, and they were created by Saatchi & Saatchi.


VizThink Europe Discount Code!

I know many of my readers would really enjoy the conference VizThink Europe, and the conference is coming up quickly.  The Europe version is in Berlin, Germany this year on October 12-14 at Crown Plaza Berlin City Centre.
We'll have lots of opportunities for hands on experiences, learning from industry gurus, and networking with your visual thinking peers. We'll be bringing a few of your favorite facilitators from San Francisco with all new content, plus a whole lot of new facilitators from Europe.
The great guys at VizThink have created a discount code for readers of Cool Infographics.  Use the code BCRK01 when you register to get €50 ($75-$80 in U.S. dollars these days) off any regular attendance fee (not student, Government or non-profit rates).

If you can get to Berlin (and I have a lot of readers from Europe), you would really get a lot from attending.

Big thanks to the guys at VizThink!


Olympic Wrap-Up

To complete the week of Olympic Infographics from the NYTimes.com, they have created a page to summarize all of the infographics they created.  They've been adding to it every day, so it won't actually be complete until the Olympics are over.


Evolution of Olympic Torches

The group at the NY Times online has been working overtime to create a bunch of infographics as part of their coverage of the 2008 Olympics.  I'm going to highlight them this week with many of the graphics they've created.  Their graphics are coming our rapid-fire just like the events in China.

First up is an Olympic Torch History graphic, highlight the torch designs since 1936 for both the Summar and Winter Olympic Games.   Roll over each torch to see deatils behind the design.


National Debt and the Presidents

First, I'm not pushing any particular political agenda.  There's considerable debate around this chart, so I don't want to start any arguments.  The debate isn't around the validity of the data, but about how it's being presented.  The information is freely available from the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Bureau of the Public Debt.

Second, I like that this chart takes a simple bar chart and adds a few more layers of information.  At its root, this is a timeline of the increase in the national debt based on the federal budget by year.  Then layered on top of that are the presidents in office that year, some color coding, the political party controlling the White House and highlights for record years.

Third, just to share the reasons for the debate.  This is a great example of data being visualized with a specific agenda in mind.  Obviously, this is a chart framed to make Republicans look bad, and Democrats look good.  The debate centers around a few issues like programs started by one President will carry into the term of another President and more importantly that the political party controlling Congress actually has more impact on the federal budget than the President does.