About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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Entries in design (417)

Saturday
Jan032009

Exploded iPhone T-Shirt


I just caught this over on Daring Fireball.  You can buy this t-shirt at www.explodedphone.com or you can see many more versions on CafePress.

Friday
Dec262008

Anamorphic Parking Garage Signage


These are images from the Eureka Tower in Melbourne, Australia.  Emery Studio (look at the "Placemaking" link) had the opportunity to use both the horizontal and vertical surfaces to design some anamorphic signage in the parking deck.  When viewed from the correct direction as you're driving, the words appear legible and lead you in the correct direction.  Viewed from another angle, the words appear as abstract lines and colors.



Thanks Ethyl for sending the link on Twitter!  Images are from the Kosmograd blog.

Monday
Dec152008

Ben Fry's Zipcode Project


Ben Fry is the author of Visualizing Data, and describes the ZipCode project in his book.  Each dot on the map is one zip code, and as you type a zip code, it highlights all of the dots that share that portion of the zip code.  You can turn on the "zoom" feature that zooms farther into the map for each digit you add.

This is built with the open source Processing tool that was recently released to the world as version 1.0.

Here are all of the zip codes that start with "6"


Thanks Steve for sending the link!

Here's a link to Ben's book on Amazon:

Thursday
Dec112008

The AI Landscape


From the Association of the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), a cool poster image designed by Giacomo Marchesi that lays out the different areas of AI development.

Thanks Zach!  Also can be found on digg.com

Tuesday
Dec022008

The Three Laws of Great Graphs

Back in July, Seth Godin posted his"three laws of great graphs" for PowerPoint presentations.  I may not agree with Seth's laws, but I thought it worth sharing for discussion.

1. One Story: While I don't agree for all infographics, I do agree with this specifically for giving PowerPoint presentation.  Steve Jobs is a master at this, or the master is whoever makes his keynote presentations.

2. No Bar Charts: I don't disagree that there are some horrible bar charts out there, but I don't think they should be eliminated altogether.  They have their place, and since they are the default chart in PowerPoint they often get used when another type of chart would be more appropriate.

3. Motion: I'll cautiously agree with this one.  Animation in PowerPoint is often distracting, but can be used as Seth describes.  Don't get caught up in slide transitions, but use animation to highlight the point you are trying to convey to your audience.

Monday
Dec012008

Voyager Infographic video


Voyager from Jaime Arvizu on Vimeo.

Jaime Arvizu, a student at the Vancouver Film School, sent me a link to this infographic video that he and his team mates (Tyler Lemermeyer and Leo Aguiar) created for their Motion Design class.  You can find a high resolution version at Jaime's blog.

Thanks for sending this in Jaime, I love it!

Wednesday
Nov262008

Welcome to the world baby...Processing


In my email yesterday I received a note announcing the release of Processing 1.0.  It's very exciting to see this project release to the world.  There have been many beta versions leading up to this release (162 versions in fact), but for those interested in creating your own infographics this is big news.  What is Processing, you ask?
Processing is an open source programming language and environment for people who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It is used by students, artists, designers, researchers, and hobbyists for learning, prototyping, and production. It is created to teach fundamentals of computer programming within a visual context and to serve as a software sketchbook and professional production tool. Processing is an alternative to proprietary software tools in the same domain.
Processing is free to download and available for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows.
Some of the infographics I have highlighted here on Cool Infographics have been created with the earlier versions of Processing, and I'm hoping for more to come.

Wednesday
Nov192008

The history of olympic medals

 
Grace Lee is a Junior at Parsons, the New School for Design in New York City.  She went back and visually laid out all of the medals won be every country in every Olympics since Athens in 1896.  Across the bottom it also shows how many nations participated each year and how many athletes were involved.  This was a project in her Information Design class, and she did a fabulous job!
The games have always brought of this world together in peace, leaving behind any racial or cultural boundaries.  The Olympic games create a time when the world can be smaller and united as a human race, rather than separate nations.  With the summer games in Beijing, China, and the upcoming games in Vancouver, Canada, the Olympic games will continue to be a time of friendly competition.

Thanks Grace.  I love how this project turned out.

By popular request I have uploaded the full PDF version here.

Thursday
Nov132008

Seasonal Visual Timelines


 
Roberto Rovira, and assistant professor of landscape architecture at the Florida International University's, School of Architecture, was kind enough to allow me to share some of his work with the readers of Cool Infographics.
 
Working as a consultant, these seasonal timelines were developed to show the activities and the plants used in a proposal for a project he led called "Envisioning Hudson Square" on the Hudson River near Manhattan, NY.
 
The first one shows the time of year that different activities would be active in this green area during the year like bicycling, bird watching and ice skating.  It also shows the different wildlife that would be present during the year like blue heron, striped bass and snowy egrets. Using the visual timeline you can see how the different activities overlap and that there would always be some type of activity during the year.
 
The second timeline from the same project show the proposed plant and trees to be used in the project, and with the use of the visual timeline shows their color and appearance throughout the year.
 
Graphics by Roberto Rovira, RLA, with assistance from landscape designer Kelly Woodward. Roberto is Assistant Professor in Landscape Architecture at Florida International University (www.fiu.edu/~soa) and Senior Landscape Architect consultant for ArquitectonicaGEO (www.arquitectonicageo.com), a Miami-based landscape and planning firm. He led GEO's design team and developed the concepts for 'Hudson Square Prints Green!', a proposal for a 30-block New York City district on Manhattan's West Side, adjacent to the Hudson River.

Wednesday
Oct292008

Classic infographic from 1823!


Here's a classic from 1823!  It a hand drawn infographic titled "Comparative Heights of the Principal Mountains and Lengths of the Principal Rivers of The World" by WR Gardner.  The high resolution image is on Flickr, but the post about the image is on bibliodyssey.blogspot.com.

This one makes a great poster!  Thanks Roi for sharing in the comments.