About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

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Caffeine Poster

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Entries in design (432)

Monday
Jan112010

The Caffeine Poster, How Much Caffeine Are You Drinking? [new infographic]

 

You are what you drink.  With so many drinks today claiming to be “energy drinks”, I wanted a little visual clarification, so I made The Caffeine Poster.  With coffee drinks on one side and canned cold drinks on the other, you can quickly see how much of a caffeine “hit” (in mg) you will get after consuming.  What’s especially interesting is many of the drinks have a very high caffeine mg/oz ratio, but the drink is so small you don’t get that much total caffeine.

 

I’ve been working on my own infographic for 6 months now off-and-on when I can make time.  I figured that I’ve been running this infographic blog for a few years now, it’s time to start putting up my own work.  Most of the data visualization I’ve designed are confidential to the company I make them for, so I wanted to create some infographics that I can publish on the blog.

 

The Caffeine Poster is supposed to help with one decision in your life.  If you’re going to grab a caffeine drink during the day (or evening), which drink should you consume?  I tried to stay focused on telling one story really well.  I’ve heard from others that this may make for a really good infographic, but may not make a great poster because a good poster would have a much deeper level of detail.  I like it, and we’ll see what king of responses I get.

 

I absolutely want to hear your feedback.  Please add your comments below or send me a note.  What do you think?  I’ve also got requests to print and offer this as a poster.  We’ll see if there is enough interest…

Also, I’m planning to post as “Making-of” article on what it took to create this infographic.

 

Making-Of The Caffeine Poster - Part 1

Making-Of The Caffeine Poster - Part 2

Making-Of The Caffeine Poster - Part 3

 

THANKS: A big thanks to Fast Company for posting about The Caffeine Poster on the Fast Company blog.  The Caffeine Poster was the most popular story of the week on Fast Company! 

 

You are what you drink!

Friday
Jan082010

16 Infographic Resumes, A Visual Trend

(It’s actually up to 18 now.)
A number of designers have attempted to design a visual, infographic resume, and while this is certainly not mainstream (yet), it is gaining some momentum.  I wanted to highlight some of the great examples available on the web, but the line between an infographic resume and a designer resume is tough not to cross.  I’ve tried to stay true to only infographic versions here, and didn’t include many good illustrated resumes that didn’t include any visualizations.

 

Michael Anderson’s 2008 concept on an infographic resume (above) is probably the most well known.  It’s been tweeted, dugg, reddit-ed and featured on FastCompany.com.

I decided to update my résumé with a different perspective on the typical time-line theme. This is just concept art, as there are almost no real metrics represented except for time. There is no energy expenditure unit of measure, nor tics to delineate percentage or otherwise.

Christopher Perkins’ resume, using the subway map metaphor.
I do agree it’s more of an overview and less of a project-experience-oriented resume, but I’ve been thinking a lot about (and looking at) resumes lately, and I feel like what you really need to do is grasp someone’s attention first. This is whyhttp://www.percious.com is listed at the top, and that’s about all listed (no address, phone number, etc.) The other thing I was thinking about doing was to add an image map with links to provide more information about the things I have worked on.

 

Also using the subway map metaphor, Kevin Wang plots out his activities during his school years.

 

Curriculum Vitae, by Uito2 in 2007, shows his experience level in different software packages as progress bars.

 

Chester, Lau Cheuk Hang, does a great job utilizing a timeline at the top of his resume with spanning arcs to highlight time spent in different activities.

Greg Dizzia also creates a Curriculum Vitae showing vertical bars spanning a timeline for each company, and adds an additional element of icons to represent different experiences during each project.

This lists my history in the design world (some lesser clients have been left out) - Designed using univers exclusively. This is an appendage to a traditional resume, to be included as a forward page in my portfolio.

Jonathan Kaczynski, also tries a subway map style using the different lines as categories instead of attempting a timeline.  I actually think this approach works a little bit better, the timeline versions appear difficult to translate into a subway map.

I am currently in the process of remaking my portfolio. It will have the appearance of a mass transit system’s website. This is the resumé that I’m working on to go along with the portfolio. It still needs a bit of clean-up and and logo needs some work.

 

Justin Evilsizor’s version incorporates a timeline, a level-of-skill chart and I personally love the addition of the Meyer’s-Briggs Type Indicator.

 

Arnaud Velten, Cartographer of Complexity, created this isometric resume.  At its heart is a timeline, but he has added an incredible amount of detail to each of his skills.  Seems like too much detail for me, but that may be what he wants to convey.

 

Maybe not technically a resume, Ritwik Dey’s Life Map is an impressive timeline of his education and activities.

This information design piece maps out my interests between ages 6 and 24 and the context in which they were born and nurtured. It also brings to surface how these interests influenced and were in turn influenced by milestones in my personal journey.

 

Stephen Gates’ resume is very clean a take on the timeline.

Why did no one try something new? Why wasn’t there one designer who took on their resume as design challenge to do something visual and different? I also realized that I was just as guilty as everyone else so I set out to design something different. So after some work in my spare time I have the design shown above (click on it to see it full sized). It is just a start and it feels like it is heading in an interesting direction but let me know what you think.

 

Bob van Vliet also created a very clean timeline resume.

I thought I’d try something different from the standard A4 with a dull summary of positions.  Four timelines represent the most important parts of my life so far: Work, Education, Activism and Fun. The years get wider towards the present as those say more about who I am now than when I just started university.

 

 

Christopher Brown’s colorful infographic timeline inspired by Michael Anderson’s concept.

 

 

Jordan Carroll’s resume includes a few different elements.  Timeline, map and charts combine into one overall resume.

 

Another colorful timeline resume, this one by Pruek Wiyaporn, also appears inspired by Michael Anderson’s concept.

 

Jesse Burton also has a very nice stylized timeline resume.

 

Which ones do you like?  Have I missed any other good ones out there?

Thanks to links found on VisualThinkMap, FastCompanyPatrick Debois

 

EDIT: Here are a few more that I missed when I originally wrote the post:

 

Mike Wirth is a freelance infographic designer.  His colorful timeline has experiences above the X-axis, education is below and his geographic locations are the shaded bars in the background.  When he learned specific software packages is also identified in the colored area, which shows how long he has been using the different software packages.

 

Gabriele Bozzi designed this resume concept that focuses totally on skills and experience.  Education is identified in the small bubbles, and the skills are connected to specific examples of her experience.  She is working on a separate timeline graphic.

Wednesday
Jan062010

Digital Podge 09 - Fantastic infographic website design

A fantastic, infographic website design for Digital Podge 2009.  Digital Podge is an annual, invitation-only lunch in London, UK for only 160 invitees.  The 2009 event was held on December 19th, and since the invite list was fixed at 160, a number of the infographics deal with data about the attendees.  Each attendee has a bar beneath their photo indicating how many connections they have on LinkedIN.

The About page shows a map of where the attendees traveled from to get to the event.

The Menu page show a breakdown of the lunch entree selections made by the attendees.

The Where? page is interactive, allowing the user to add or remove layers to the map that can show restaurants, bus stops, subway stations, parks, etc.

Designed by London digital agency Line, the site employs simple infographics with a touch of tongue-in-cheek humor.

“While simply being invited to Digital Podge is a huge honour in itself, being tasked with developing and carry out all the campaign touch points for the event is an exercise that holds the agency up to the scrutiny of its peers like no other project. It’s probably one of the most demanding briefs in the sector, but our team of designers and developers revelled in the opportunity to use data in a humorous and informative manner that highlights some of the plusses and minuses of a cutting edge industry,” said Ross Laurie, Managing Director at Line.

Monday
Jan042010

Visual Mapping Blogroll - Subway Map of Infographic Websites

 

The Visual Mapping Blogroll!  I only recently came across this great use of the Subway Map infographic metaphor.  The map is a listing of website bookmarks grouped into categories for each line.  And the best part is that the overall theme is infographics and design websites, so the categories are things like Visualization, Mind Mapping, Humor, Creativity, Thinkers, etc.

Created by Claude Aschenbrenner (SerialMapper.com), the graphic is modeled onto the Paris subway system.  Because of that (and that Claude speaks French), each line is identified in French on the left end and English on the right end.  Websites that are in French are also noted in blue text.

He has two posts about the subway map and how it was created here and here.  There’s also an alternate version based on the website authors.

Great job Claude!  (and not just because Cool Infographics was included on the map…)  Can we expect to see an updated version anytime soon?

Thanks to the #smchat group on Twitter for the link!

 

EDIT: I forgot to add that each node is an active HTML link, so when viewing the map you are able to click on any site to be taken directly there.

Wednesday
Dec302009

The Last 10 Years...Visually

 

Great chart by Phillip Niemeyer over on NYTimes.com, Picturing the Past 10 Years.  Using icons and unique pictures, Phillip captures the key event of each year in 12 different categories.

Found on FlowingData, WeLoveDataVis, and it was tweeted but a few people on my Twitter list, Cool Infographics People.

Tuesday
Dec292009

Welcome to the New & Improved "Cool Infographics"

Cool Infographics 2.0

Over the holidays I’m moving the Cool Infographics blog to a new host (Squarespace.com) so I can add some new features.  This time seemed the best since traffic is really low during the holidays.  Please pardon any issues you have in the next couple of days.

Here’s what you can expect from Cool Infographics in 2010:

  • Updates to the overall design
  • Same URL: CoolInfographics.com
  • Same RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/CoolInfographics
  • New infographics bookstore
  • New infographics posters store/links
  • New infographics job postings with a separate RSS feed to alert you to new entries
  • New links page to infographic design software
  • How-to features for creating your own infographics
  • New comment system

You feedback on these changes is very welcome.  So please feel free to use the contact page in the new site design to let me know what you like or don’t like.  And as always, please send me infographics suggestions to include in the blog.

Randy

Tuesday
Dec222009

Holiday Cliché Find-It Graphic from Xplane.com



Check out this fun Holiday Cliché Find-It graphic from Xplane.com!  It's available as a 11x17" sized PDF so you can view or print it out.

“Get your ducks in a row” so that you aren't “caught with your pants down” this holiday season! After all, it can be like “herding cats” out there this time of year, and you definitely don't want to get stuck “in the weeds.” So, go ahead and take a minute to “shop this around,” “see if it sticks” and celebrate from a “10,000-foot view.” It's all “blue sky” from here on out, nothing but a “win-win situation!”

Think you know your business clichés? Find where they're hiding in this holiday XPLANATiON™ created by your friends at XPLANE! Just click the image above to download the tabloid-sized 11x17" PDF.
Thanks to Parker at Xplane.com

Friday
Dec182009

Word Spectrums! The Online Infographic Battleground



On Chris Harrison's site, there are a number of graphics that he calls Word Spectrums.  More like a battleground, Chris is using the enormous amount of data from websites that has been made public by Google.  This is an advanced form of a word cloud that visualizes related words and their relative connections to the two topics.  (FYI, since this is based on raw Google data, foul language does appear in some of them).


Using Google's enormous bigram dataset, I produced a series of visualizations that explore word associations. Each visualization pits two primary terms against each other. Then, the use frequency of words that follow these two terms are analyzed. For example, "war memorial" occurs 531,205 times, while "peace memorial" occurs only 25,699. A position for each word is generated by looking at the ratio of the two frequencies. If they are equal, the word is placed in the middle of the scale. However, if there is a imbalance in the uses, the word is drawn towards the more frequently related term. This process is repeated for thousands of other word combinations, creating a spectrum of word associations. Font size is based on a inverse power function (uniquely set for each visualization, so you can't compare across pieces). Vertical positioning is random.


Chris has created and shared a number of different versions on the Word Spectrum page of his website, and you can see high-resolutions PDFs of each there.

Want to try your own?  Building on Chris' idea, Jeff Clark from Neoformix has created interactive Word Spectrums using either Twitter or News as the source that lets you enter your own terms to compete.  I especially like the idea of pitting two competing brands against one another.




Saturday
Dec122009

My Digital Life - personal infographic



My Digital Life, is an quick infographic by me!  A mindmap or network map of the digital products in my life, and how they all interconnect. Each connection is color-coded by the connection type (USB, wireless, ethernet, etc.) including its respective standard icon.  High-res version is on Flickr.

This started as a simple sketch to help me determine how to add a new external hard drive I got on Black Friday, but it quickly became much more fun to see how far out I could push the network.  I already know of some more that I want to add, so someday there may be a 2.0 version.  Apparently, I could use an IT manager at home.




I did ignore some differences within the connection types to keep this fairly simple.  I don't distinguish between USB 1.1 and USB 2.0 connections.  I use "Display" as a connection type, but its a DVI connection for the MacBook, a HDMI connection from the AppleTV and a composite connection from the DVD player.  I also show only one "Wireless" connection, but I know that the iPhone only uses 802.11g and the laptop uses 802.11n.

I did this using OmniGraffle, with a little help from Pixelmator and Keynote to clean up the images.

Tuesday
Dec082009

Infographic Coins!



What a great infographic product design idea!  From designer Mac Funamizu on his site, PetitInvention, Infographic Coins that use the physical analogy of a pie chart to help consumers figure out the currency, especially when visiting a foreign country.  You have to ignore some of the benefits of all round coins, but the idea is spot-on.  Feeling in your pocket, you could almost always pull out the right coin.



The round shaped coins must have a lot of benefits that other figures such as a triangle or a square don’t. Also, non-rounded coins may have many demerits. Aside from those, travelers and other people who are not accustomed to the currency would be able to easily remember how much each of these coins is (as long as she knows how to read pie charts).