About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

Search the Cool Infographics site

Custom Search

 

Subscriptions:

 

Feedburner

The Cool Infographics® Gallery:

How to add the
Cool Infographics button to your:

Cool Infographics iOS icon

- iPhone
- iPad
- iPod Touch

 

Read on Flipboard for iPad and iPhone

Featured in the Tech & Science category

Flipboard icon

Twitter Feed
From the Bookstore

Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Entries in design (413)

Monday
Feb242014

How to Create Beautiful Calligraphy

How to Create Beautiful Calligraphy infographic

Calligraphy is a skill that requires a lot of practice. But no amount of practice will help you if you don’t have the right tools. The How to Create Beautiful Calligraphy infographic from Moo explains everything that you need to be successful. From the tools you need, to how to actually do each letter.

The graphic is a step-by-step guide to creating your own stunning hand-drawn calligraphy, and explores everything from the tools and materials you need, to how to draw the perfect curve with your nib.  The design very clearly walks the audience through the sequence of information using illustrations to enhance each point.

The text is a little bit too small when the infographic is sized to fit within a blog post (usually 600 pixels wide, as you can see above), but that can also have the benefit of encouraging readers to click through to see the original full-size version on the Moo site.

The footer of the infographic should include a copyright statement (or Creative Commons) to clearly outline the rights for sharing that the publisher wants to allow online.   Also, the URL to the original infographic landing page on the Moo site would be very helpful.  Currently it is very hard to find on the Moo site, and is not included in any blog posts that I could find.  Including the URL in the infographic image itself ensures that readers will be able to find the orignal even when the infographic is shared in social media without a correct link back to the original.

Thanks to Dan for sending in the link!

Tuesday
Feb112014

The "Perfectly Optimized" Page

 The Perfectly Optimized Page infographic

The “Perfectly Optimized” Page infographic states that there is no such thing as a “Perfect Page”. But don’t be discouraged! Moz.com presents 3 key points to be followed to increase user happiness and outreach.

One important takeaway from this post should be that modern on-page SEO is about juggling competing priorities. In general, my recommended ordering of those priorities is as follows:

  1. Create a page that is uniquely valuable to your targeted searchers.
  2. If at all possible, make the page likely to earn links and shares naturally (without needing to build links or prod people).
  3. Balance keyword targeting with usability and user experience, but never ignore the critical elements like page titles, headlines, and body content at the least.

There’s no such thing as a “perfectly optimized” page, but I took a stab at drawing up the mythical beast anyway.

Over time, what’s “perfect” might change, and new services, platforms, and areas of optimizational opportunity could arise. But for the past few years (notwithstanding some newer tactics like Google’s rel=author), the model described in this post has held relatively stable. The “O” in SEO is getting broader, and I think that’s a wonderful thing for marketers of all stripes. Targeting an algorithm instead of people is far worse than hitting both birds with the same handful of optimization stones.

This is a great us of infographics and data visualziations as part of a larger article.  The infographics can stand on their own and be shared online, but also fit inn perfectly with the text article.  This specific design is more of a blueprint diagram without showing and data, but has been very popular by itself.

Found on Hubspot.com and Hombrehormiga1

Thursday
Jan302014

Cool Infographics: Best Practices Group on LinkedIn

Cool Infographics LinkedIn Group

I am excited to announce the launch of a new LinkedIn Group, Cool Infographics: Best Practices. I have personally been a part of many great discussion groups over the years and believe that this group fills an unmet need.  Please accept this invitation to join the group to share your own experiences and wisdom.

There are many groups that share infographics, but I felt that a discussion group dedicated to the craft of infographics and data visualization was missing.  This group will feature questions and case studies about how companies are leveraging infographics and data visualization as a communication tool.  Any posts that are just links to infographics will be moderated to keep the focus on engaging discussions.  Topics and questions from the Cool Infographics book will also be discussed.

Join us in a professional dialogue surrounding case studies and strategies for designing infographics and using them as a part of an overall marketing strategy.  We welcome both beginning and established professionals to share valuable tactics and experiences as well as fans of infographics to learn more about this growing field.

-Randy

 

Friday
Nov082013

Apple Release Patterns

Apple Total Release Patterns infographic

Apple Release Patterns is a new personal project of mine, and you can find the full-size original versions on a new, dedicated landing page on the InfoNewt.com site.  Every few months Apple releases a new product update or redesign, and the rumors start flying about what the upcoming product will be during the preceding weeks.  For better or worse, those speculations are often based on what was released in the same timeframe the prior year.

This data visualization lines up vertical columns for each year, starting with 2007.  I decided that anything further back wasn’t really relevant to Apple’s current practices.  Each product release is then mapped onto the calendar, showing a pattern (or lack of pattern) to the product releases.  If the product announcement was separate from the actual release date, I mapped that date as well.

This data was ripe for a visualization.  When I tried to look at the historical dates of product releases, the information was scattered across multiple sites, confusing and difficult to gather.  Some information was contradictory, which required further investigation.  So, the data topic itself was a good target for a clear, easy-to-understand visualization.  However, the design with all of the products was too complicated visually to perceive any defining patterns.  So, I created separate versions that break out the products into 3 categories, and those are much easier for readers to see the patterns.

Apple iOS Release Patterns infographic

For iOS devices (iPod, iPad, iPhone and AppleTV) you can see the pattern shift in 2011 for most of the products to a Fall timeframe.  You can also see a recently consistent announcement date with the product release the following Friday.

Apple MacBook Release Patterns infographic

For Apple’s laptop line, the MacBooks, you can see the MacBook Air has become a regular release during the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in June, and the MacBook Pro gets fairly regular updates twice a year, usually just to update the internal specifications.

Apple Desktop Mac Release Patterns infographic

The desktop Mac line doesn’t seem to show much pattern at all.  They might get an update each year, but the timing is erratic.  Sometimes they are part of WWDC, sometimes part of the Fall iOS events, and sometimes completely on their own.

I’m going to keep updating these on the landing page as Apple releases new products in the future (upcoming iPad Mini 2 Retina and Mac Pro still need to start shipping this year).  I want these to become a valuable resource every time the Apple rumor mill heats up about the next product announcement.  If you use the embed code on the Apple Release Patterns landing page, your site will also display the updates automatically as they become available.

This is version 1.0.  I have some ideas and improvements I want to make in future versions, but I would love to hear your thoughts as well.  Post any suggestions or feedback in the comments below.

Tuesday
Oct152013

The Power of Colorful Customers

The Power of Color infographic

The Power of Color infographic from Pega is about treating each customer as an individual. Each individual has their own colors and CSPs can paint their customer processes to make them more specific, more relevant, more proactive, and more effective for the individual customer.

By applying color to all of their customer processes at the moment of truth, communications service providers can take the next best actions relevant to each customer. Doing this over the life times of their subscribers delivers exceptional value to both customers and service providers.

There’s a lot of text in this design, and the use of the colors as metaphor for specific customer attributes is a little bit confusing.  Otherwise this is fantastic information, and easy for the reader to follow.  The footer should include a copyright statement, and the URL link back to the infographic landing page som readers can find the full-size original version.

Thanks Caitlin for sending in the link!

Friday
Oct112013

xkcd - Tall Infographics

xkcd - Tall Infographics

The Tall Infographics design from Randall Munroe at xkcd literally made me laugh out loud.  As he mentions in the text:

“‘Big Data’ doesn’t just mean increasing the font size.”

Very similar to something I repeat here on Cool Infographics all the time.  “Big fonts are not data visualizations!”

However, the format of the Tall Infographic is here to stay.  The tall format fits nicely in the content area of most websites and blogs, and the user experience of scrolling vertically is much easier than scrolling horizontally.

Found on Gizmodo and Stats Chat

Monday
Oct072013

The Color Emotion Guide

The Color Emotion Guide infographic

The Color Emotion Guide arranges well known company logos into a rainbow of emotion to help readers understand which logos are using color to create a perception of their brands.

Logo designers have several puzzles to solve when presented with a new logo design project. One of the main considerations that a designer must deal with is to understand what it is that the client wants to achieve with the logo design.

The designer asks the client a series of questions that illicit answers helping to bring the parts of the puzzle together. A typical question might be “What qualities does your business want to be known for?” The answer might be for a doctor for instance, “I want to be known as someone you can trust”. So the question and answer begs: How does the designer portray trust in the logo design?

Scientists have been studying the way we react to colors for many years.  Certain colors make us feel a certain way about something. As long as the designer knows what these colors and emotions are, the designer can use that information to help present the business in the right way. These are not hard and fast rules but smart designers use the information to their clients advantage.

This fun infographic lays out the emotions and qualities that well known brands like to be known for. The color psychology is only one part of the puzzle but I think you will agree it is a very important part of it.

As far as I can tell, this appears to be a design from The Logo Company, but it was very hard to track down.  Infographics are usually shared without the accompanying articles, so designs need to include basic information like their own company logo, a copyright statement and the URL back to the original design in the actual image file.

Found on Laughing Squid

Saturday
Sep282013

Gone To Press!

It’s out of my hands!

This week, my project editor at Wiley told me that Cool Infographics the book has officially “gone to press!”  That means that all of the electronic layout files have been sent to the printer, and the book is in the printing schedule.  The official release date is October 28th, from online book retailers and should even include your local bookstore!

Over the last 12 months I’ve been gathering all of the materials together into the binder you see above, but I’m super excited to see the complete printed book.  I can’t wait to see the printed copy and share it with everyone.  You’ll love the full-color infographics and data visualization examples included.  The final book will be close to 380 pages!

Intended for everyone, not just designers, the book explains how to utilize infographics effectively as part of a content marketing strategy.  Things like how to structure your information flow, how to choose a topic, how to be credible to your audience, and how to publish and promote your final infographic design.  Just like this site, the book includes visual examples from designers and companies all over the world.  I designed a bunch of custom data visualizations for the book, but most of the examples are some of the coolest infographics from the web.

You can find out more about the book on the dedicated landing page I setup here: coolinfographics.com/book

To receive the book as fast as possible, pre-order your copy today from Amazon, Barnes & Noble or directly from Wiley!

 

Monday
Sep162013

Introducing Cool Infographics, the book

Introducing Cool Infographics, the book

 

Today I’m excited to introduce my new book, Cool Infographics: Effective Communication with Data Visualization and Design!  This project has taken up an enormous portion of my time over the last 12 months and will be available at the end of October 2013 from all major booksellers (print and ebook).

This book is written for anyone that wants to learn how to use infographics and data visualizations more effectively.  Whether you design your own or work with a designer, the tactics and tips included will help you create better infographics and effectively publish them online.  Using over 100 visual examples from designers all over the world, I explain how companies are successfully using infographics every day.  It is an accumulation of knowledge and experience from designing infographics and running the Cool Infographics blog over the last seven years.

Seven major areas are covered in depth:

  • The Science of Infographics: Why do infographics work?  Humans are visual creatures.  Any information that we can communicate visually will get more attention, is easier to understand and is more likely to be remembered.  Infographics tell stories with data using a combination of data visualizations, images, illustrations and text.  Used effectively, infographics can be one of the most powerful forms of communication.
  • Online Infographics: The use of infographics online has grown exponentially in the last few years.  Why are infographics so popular as online content and how are infographics being used successfully by companies?  Are you trying to build your brand equity, drive traffic to your website or explain product features to your customers?  Different goals require different types of infographics, so make sure you know how to plan your infographics for success.
  • Infographics and SEO: Why do some infographic go viral and others flop?  Infographics and Search Engine Optimization (SEO) go hand in hand, but you have put some effort into releasing an infographic.  Issues like keywords, embed code, online lifespan, meta data and landing pages all have an impact on the success of your infographic online.  A complete infographic release strategy is outlined that covers the entire process from releasing the infographic to getting posts and links from other sites.
  • Infographic Resumes: The use of data visualization design to improve job candidate resumes is still new, but is growing rapidly.  Good infographic resumes combine the best practices from traditional resume design and viral online infographics.  Learn to design a cool infographic resume of your own.
  • Internal Confidential Infographics: There’s a secret world of data visualizations and infographics being used inside companies using confidential data.  Unlike online infographics, these internal designs are often included in presentations or shared as printed handouts.  Take the best parts of online infographics, and adapt them for your own use in presentations.
  • Designing Infographics:  Will your infographic pass the 5-second rule?  This chapter will help you design great infographics with clear data visualizations, transparent data sources and engaging topics.  We look at some best design practices as well as some common mistakes to avoid. 
  • Design Resources: Ready to get started?  Designing infographics is a combination of visualizing data, creating custom illustrations, editing images and putting together the complete design.  I’ve gathered together the major tools used by infographic designers to help you find the right software for your project.  I’ve even included a number of sources for finding data and websites that can be used to design complete infographics.

Pre-order now to get your copy as soon as it’s released!

Wednesday
Sep112013

Information is Beautiful Awards Deadline Friday Sep 13th

Information is Beautiful Awards

The deadline for submitting design entries to the Information is Beautiful Awards is this Friday, September 13th.  Anyone can enter and the available categories are:

  • Data journalism
  • Data visualization
  • Infographic/information design
  • Interactive visualization
  • Motion infographic
  • Website

The Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards celebrate excellence and beauty in data visualizations, infographics and information art.

Last year we awarded 26 prizes across 6 categories and 8 special awards with entries from more than 20 different countries. The standard was exceptionally high and we really appreciate the effort people put into entering the awards.

The Awards were set up in 2012 by David McCandless, journalist and datavisualizer,  in collaboration with Aziz Kami, Creative Director, Kantar.

The Awards are non-profit and community-driven – that means you don’t need to shell out a big wedge of cash to enter your work, and if you’re successful, you won’t need to shell out again for a fancy sit down dinner awards night.

 

Information is Beautiful Awards Prizes