About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

DFW DataViz Meetup


Join the Meetup Group if you’re in the Dallas/Fort Worth area!

Search the Cool Infographics site

Custom Search

Strata Conference Discount Code
Subscriptions:

 

Feedburner

The Cool Infographics® Gallery:

How to add the
Cool Infographics button to your:

Cool Infographics iOS icon

- iPhone
- iPad
- iPod Touch

 

Read on Flipboard for iPad and iPhone

Featured in the Tech & Science category

Flipboard icon

Twitter Feed
From the Bookstore

Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Monday
Dec072009

Scale Model of the Solar System



The Scale Model of the Solar System (from phrenopolis.com) shows both the relative sizes of the planets and the Sun as well as representing the distances from the Sun on the same scale.  This image is huge (just over half a mile wide), and as you can imagine mostly black.
This page shows a scale model of the solar system, shrunken down to the point where the Sun, normally more than eight hundred thousand miles across, is the size you see it here. The planets are shown in corresponding scale. Unlike most models, which are compressed for viewing convenience, the planets here are also shown at their true-to-scale average distances from the Sun. That makes this page rather large - on an ordinary 72 dpi monitor it's just over half a mile wide, making it possibly one of the largest pages on the web. This means you'll have to do a bit of scrolling if you want to find the planets, but don't despair. They are reasonably bright and labeled, so you can probably catch them flashing by in the blackness even if you are scrolling fairly fast.
Found on Information Aesthetics.

Friday
Dec042009

Enter the "Visualize The BCS" Infographic Contest! #BCSvisual



Think you can design an infographic?  Well now's your chance to prove it!

Announcing the "Visualize the BCS" contest from InfoJocks.com!  The Bowl Championship Series causes a ton of debate between sports fans over the holidays.  We want you to design an infographic about the BCS.  What to visualize is completely up to you, but must meet two criteria: 1) relate to the BCS and 2) use statistics.  Should be easy, right?

Prizes:  Three winners. Best Entry gets two posters of their choice and a $50.00 gift certificate to ESPN’s online store. And to keep it interesting, Most Artistic Entry and Most Analytical Entry both receive posters as well. All entrants with legitimate entries will receive a free set of our Taxonomy of Team Names gift cards.

Of course, I will post the winners here on Cool Infographics and maybe more of the entries as well.

Deadline:  All entries are due January 1, 2010. The winner will be selected before the National Championship is played. Send your entry in PNG, JPEG, or PDF format to contest@infojocks.com, along with your mailing address.

Visit the InfoJocks.com blog for complete details and some ideas.  Jeremy will be posting some links to possible resources and datasets next week.

Spread the Word!  Also, from Cool Infographics you can win a free poster by helping us spread the word.  Tweet about the contest on Twitter with a link back to this post and include the hashtag #BCSvisual.  On December 21st, I'll use a random number generator to pick a random qualifying Tweet and send you a free poster from Infojocks.  (only one Tweet per person will qualify)  An example Tweet would look like this:

Enter the "Visualize The BCS" infographic contest by Infojocks and Cool Infographics!  #BCSvisual http://bit.ly/8Fo4Ii


Remember, everyone who enters will receive a FREE set of Taxonomy of Team Names gift cards.

Thursday
Dec032009

Sports Infographic Poster Deal from Infojocks!



Jeremy over at Infojocks is offering a special discount deal for the holidays: Buy one poster, and get the second poster for half price!  (offer good through Friday, Dec 11th).  That's any two posters from his store for $30!  Choose from "Cities of Champions", "Taxonomy of Team Names" or "Road to the Stanley Cups".

For readers of Cool Infographics to take advantage of the deal, go to the Infojocks store.  No promotion code necessary, the discount will be automatic when you add two posters to your shopping cart.

Infojocks.com is a great site by our friend Jeremy Yingling who designs and produces infographic posters covering sports related topics.  Great gifts for the sports fan on your Christmas list!

Wednesday
Dec022009

Ebay Visualizes Black Friday 2009 - Interactive infographic map



From ebay, a map of the transaction activity on Black Friday 2009 (the shopping day after Thanksgiving).  1 million transaction are mapped in the U.S. over the course of the day!
Activity Level Indicator The color of the point on the map indicates the number of transactions that occurred in the corresponding area.
Data Execution This transaction map was created as a study of the extensive activity that occurs in the eBay Marketplace on the biggest offline shopping day of the year. It is a visualization of all U.S.-based buyer and seller transactions on eBay on Black Friday, November 27, 2009 (12:00:00 AM to 11:59:59 PM EST). Although eBay is an international marketplace, this map is focused on U.S. data, as Black Friday is the traditional beginning of the holiday shopping season for the U.S.
It's an interactive, animated timeline, so you can watch the transactions grow throughout the day and zoom in to specific areas of the country by clicking on the map.  It's a flash animation, but there's a WMV movie file available for download too.

They also did a map of the even bigger 1.4 million transactions on Cyber Monday 2009.

Found on VizWorld


Tuesday
Dec012009

Vote With Your Dollars! - Corporate Political Contributions infographic



Vote With Your Dollars, is a corporate political contributions map.  Using the public data from the Center for Responsive Politics (2004-2008), GoodGuide.com has plotted the balance of contributions from companies.  Mouse-over a specific company logo to see the detailed data (like Dell above).
View the political contributions of your favorite companies and see how you vote with your dollars.  The data is surprising!
You can choose specific companies or business sectors, and then change the sort order.  Here is the retail sector sorted by Most Democratic Leaning:



Thanks Anthony for sending in the link.  Sorry it took so long to get posted.

Friday
Nov272009

Black Friday Deal! 3-for-1 posters at Flowing Prints



Nathan over at FlowingData and FlowingPrints is offering a special 3 posters for the price of 1 deal for Black Friday (offer good through Sunday 11/29).  That's all three posters for $20!

For readers of Cool Infographics to take advantage of the deal, go to FlowingPrints, click on the "Buy The Series" button and use the promotion code: bfridayfps20

The three posters all focus on Education, titled "College High", "Education: Enrollment and Dropouts" and "How America Learns: by the Numbers".  If not for yourself, think about buying a set for your local school or library!

The state of education in America is the theme of this series. With funds getting cut nationwide, it's important to know how today's youth are learning (or not learning).  We looked at over three decades of data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Education has seen a lot of improvement over the years, but there is still plenty of room for growth.
Also, for every print you buy, Nathan will send an additional one to a local school too!  Thanks Nathan!

Wednesday
Nov252009

Cool Infographics on the Amazon Kindle!



The Cool Infographics RSS feed is now available as a subscription for the Amazon Kindle!

It downloads the new blog posts wirelessly through the Amazon Whispernet network so you can view them anytime, even when you're not connected to the network.  It looks pretty good for being in black & white.  You do get to see the images I post on the blog, but you have to come back and view them on your computer to get the full color images.

Kindle Blogs are auto-delivered wirelessly to the Kindle and updated throughout the day. They are fully downloaded onto your Kindle so you can read them even when you're not wirelessly connected. And unlike RSS readers which often only provide headlines, blogs on Kindle contain full text content and most images.
I  just figured out that this was even possible.  Amazon sets their own price, which they have set at $1.99 per month for some unknown reason.  I do get a very small piece of that, so subscribing does support the Cool Infographics blog.

To give credit, I saw the link on Matthew Hurst's Data Mining blog.

Wednesday
Nov252009

Florence Nightingale: Causes of Mortality infographic from 1858!



Yes, from that Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), and it's from 1858!  The polar area diagram is also known as the Nightingale Rose Graph.

From Wikipedia,
This "Diagram of the causes of mortality in the army in the East" was published in Notes on Matters Affecting the Health, Efficiency, and Hospital Administration of the British Army and sent to Queen Victoria in 1858.


This graphic indicates the number of deaths that occured from preventable diseases (in blue), those that were the results of wounds (in red), and those due to other causes (in black). 
The legend reads: 
The Areas of the blue, red, & black wedges are each measured from the centre as the common vertex. The blue wedges measured from the centre of the circle represent area for area the deaths from Preventable or Mitigable Zymotic diseases, the red wedges measured from the centre the deaths from wounds, & the black wedges measured from the centre the deaths from all other causes. The black line across the red triangle in Nov. 1854 marks the boundary of the deaths from all other causes during the month. In October 1854, & April 1855, the black area coincides with the red, in January & February 1855,(*) the blue coincides with the black. The entire areas may be compared by following the blue, the red, & the black lines enclosing them.
Also from Wikipedia:
Florence Nightingale had exhibited a gift for mathematics from an early age and excelled in the subject under the tutorship of her father. Later, Nightingale became a pioneer in the visual presentation of information and statistical graphics. Among other things she used the pie chart, which had first been developed by William Playfair in 1801.
Florence Nightingale is credited with developing a form of the pie chart now known as the polar area diagram, or occasionally the Nightingale rose diagram, equivalent to a modern circular histogram to illustrate seasonal sources of patient mortality in the military field hospital she managed. Nightingale called a compilation of such diagrams a "coxcomb", but later that term has frequently been used for the individual diagrams. She made extensive use of coxcombs to present reports on the nature and magnitude of the conditions of medical care in the Crimean War to Members of Parliament and civil servants who would have been unlikely to read or understand traditional statistical reports.
In her later life Nightingale made a comprehensive statistical study of sanitation in Indian rural life and was the leading figure in the introduction of improved medical care and public health service in India.
In 1859 Nightingale was elected the first female member of the Royal Statistical Society and she later became an honorary member of the American Statistical Association.
Found this while reading the great FlowingData post "9 Ways to Visualize Proportions – A Guide" by Nathan Yau.

KXVTA2R4XWE3
FRJK52DWMBJQ

Monday
Nov232009

Probes in the Universe - cool interactive infographic



Space Probes is a very well-done interactive graphic about all of the space probes we have launched, visually placing the probes in orbit around the object they are observing.  You can move around the 3-D space with the keyboard controls, change the date range with the sliders on the bottom or go directly to a particular probe from the list on the right that is group by planet or object they are around.  When you mouse-over a particular probe you get more details and an image.



The article and the infographic are in Portuguese from Brazil, so I took the liberty of using the Google Translator for a little help.
The infographic "Space Probes" Super, produced by the team of Internet Editora Abril Jovem, took the silver medal in the category Online Malofiej, top prize in the world of computer graphics.
Thanks to Daniel for the link and a little more information:
It won Malofiej's silver medal (first place, no gold medal) this year. 
It's an infographic about all space probes launched until the date it was published (except Earth probes, which are too many). The info has information about each probe, including the organization(s) that sent it, the target planet(s) (or moons, asteroids, comets and the sun), launch date and mission details, as well as pictures for most of them. User can navigate through our Solar System using the mouse and/or keyboard. It's also possible to know the details of Mars Science Laboratory, the next NASA probe to visit the red planet. The info is in Portuguese, but anyone can understand it's features and learn a little bit about space exploration so far.

Thursday
Nov192009

Cool Infographics 2.0 BETA


Exciting things are happening around here!  Watch closely in the next couple of weeks for a bunch of changes to Cool Infographics!  I'll also post about the changes as they happen on Twitter.

Step 1: Cool Infographics now has a new URL address:  www.coolinfographics.com

Please change your bookmarks to the new address.  The old URL address, coolinfographics.blogspot.com, will keep working for a few weeks, but eventually will go away.
If you use an RSS reader, nothing changes.  The RSS feed doesn't change so you don't have to do anything.

Step 2: Watch for the design changes in the next few weeks (like the new logo above!).  I've got some big plans for Cool Infographics.

Sounds easy with only two steps doesn't it?  That's because I get to do all of the work.

Thanks to everyone for reading and subscribing!