About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

Infographic Design

Infographics Design | Presentations
Consulting | Data Visualizations

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Tuesday
Nov102009

The Timeline of Michael Jordan



Created by Khoi Nguyen as a class project, The Timeline of Michael Jordan lays out the key events of his spectacular career with iconic images representative of each time period.  A little design work work makes what could be a simple timeline into a great infographic that draws the reader in.

Check out Khoi's blog/portfolio.



Great work Khoi!


Monday
Nov092009

ANC Spending infographic



Diaan Minhardt created this simple infographic for his blog, Dreamfoundry, to show how money being spend on new cars for government officials could have been spent differently to build houses.
I’ve been keeping an eye on the rivers of money haemorrhaging out of the government coffers for idiotic reasons for some time now. What I saw inspired me to create this very simple infographic.
Thanks Diaan!

Thursday
Nov052009

Verizon 3G Infographic Commercial Causes Lawsuit

Verizon's new "There's a Map for That" television commercial uses these floating maps to compare their coverage area for the high-speed 3G network to AT&T's 3G coverage area.

From what I can tell, the maps are in fact accurate in representing the 3G network coverage; however, AT&T has now sued Verizon because the ad misleads customers to believe that AT&T doesn't have coverage in the blank areas.  AT&T does have coverage in most of the blank areas, but it's the slower 2.5G/EDGE network.

Even if the graphics are completely accurate, infographics can definitely be used to lead the viewer to an incorrect conclusion that the author wants to communicate.

Found on Infothetics.

Wednesday
Nov042009

XKCD: Movie Narrative Charts



Great post by the XKCD online comic series!  They occasionally post a infographic-style piece, and this one doesn't disappoint.

Created by Randall Munroe at XKCD, the Movie Narrative Charts plot the interactions between key characters on a timeline, grouping the character lines together when they are interacting in the movies.  He obviously spent some time working on these, and be sure to check out the detail in the full size version.



The last two are jokes, but the ones for Lord of the Rings, the original Star Wars Trilogy and Jurassic Park are real and very well done.  I love the Primer chart poke at trying to follow the movie!  Not as mainstream as the other movies, but it's definitely appropriate.  I'd love to see how Randall would chart Memento!

Thanks Tom for the email link!  Popular on the blogs, this was also found on Infothetics, FlowingData, SimpleComplexity, VizWorld and Fast Company.

Sunday
Nov012009

Twitter List: Cool Infographics People



Introducing, the Cool Infographics People Twitter list! 

Last week, I got a nice surprise from Twitter.  My home page featured a new, sizable banner that announced the “beta” release of lists.  I'm lucky I went to the Twitter home page, because I usually use TweetDeck for Twitter and I wouldn't have seen it.

I started with everyone from my recent post "37 People You Should Follow for Infographics on Twitter" including all of the people that had been suggested after that post came out.  I added a bunch from the datavisualization.ch post "30 More People You Should Follow for Info Graphics on Twitter" by Ben.  Finally I found a handful of more infographics people just by using the new lists function to see who else is on other lists.

I knew lists were coming out in waves, slowly letting more and more people get access to the new feature, so I was on the lookout.  I think it's been rolled out to most Twitter users, but your account needs to be enabled with lists before you can see the lists from other people.  Once your account has been enabled, you will see a new statistic "Listed" on your Home page.



This shows you how many lists that other people have created that you've been included in.  Once you start following or creating lists, a new Lists section is added to your sidebar.  Here you can see the lists that you follow or manage yourself.



Please follow the Cool Infographics People list if you use Twitter, and obvously I will continue to add more infographic people to the list as I find them.  Also, please make any suggestions you think I am missing.

Friday
Oct302009

What's a Gruzzle?



So, what's a Gruzzle?  With extensive use of Venn Diagrams, GL Hoffman often posts these visual blog posts on his blog, What Would Dad Say, and Fast Company has also started pubishing them as well.



So back to the original question, What's a Gruzzle?  Here's a really good answer, by one of his readers:



But here's the official answer:



You can also follow @GLHoffman on Twitter

Thursday
Oct292009

Visualizing American 2009 TV Season Ratings



Rachel Cunliffe has created a great infographic for the new 2009 US TV shows showing how their viewer numbers are fairing compared to each other and their own premiere episodes.  I only see three shows that have a higher average viewers than their premiere.  Others are not doing well at all, and they probably won't be around for much longer...
Here's a summary of how the new season TV shows are faring in the US based on episodes screened to date.
For comparison purposes, this year's American Idol premiere ratings have been included.
TBL, aka The Beautiful Life, has already been canned by the CW.


Great work Rachel!  You can follow Rachel on Twitter at @cre8d

Wednesday
Oct282009

A Graphic History of Newspaper Circulation



From The Awl, this certainly isn't the prettiest infographic I've ever seen (it's basically just a line chart), but it tells it's story to the viewer very well.  Maybe there are times when a simple chart from Excel can do the job...NAH.   From a title that proclaims "A Graphic History of Newspaper Circulation" we certainly expect much more visual information.

I'm sure many of the graphic designers reading this blog could turn this data into a significantly better infographic (hint, hint...).

Every six months, the Audit Bureau of Circulations releases data about newspapers and how many people subscribe to them. And then everyone writes a story about how some newspapers declined some amount over the year previous. Well, that's no way to look at data! It's confusing—and it obscures larger trends. So we've taken chunks of data for the major newspapers, going back to 1990, and graphed it, so you can see what's actually happened to newspaper circulation. (We excluded USA Today, because we don't care about it. If you're in a hotel? You're reading it now. That's nice.)
Some surprising trends: the New York Post has the same circulation it had two decades ago! Also, the once-captivating battle of the New York City tabloids has become completely moot.
Some unsurprising trends: the Los Angeles Times is an absolute horrorshow. Not shown: the Boston Globe disappearing off the bottom of this chart, in a two decade decline from 521,000 in 1990 to 264,105 this year.
Found on Daring Fireball.

Tuesday
Oct272009

Eye Tracking Infographic Plots


Eye tracking is used is a number of different fields of study; consumer interaction design, advertisements, product packaging, website/software usability, store shelf merchandising design and many more.  The results are plotted visually as an infographic, because it instantly makes the data understandable to the researchers.

In the fixation map image above, a participant's focal points on a website are tracked and the points are numbered in sequential order (like connect-the-dots).  The dots are also each sized based on "Gaze Duration", the amount of time the participant spent looking at that particular point.  In the example above, it took the participant 90 fixations to find the information they were looking for...not a good site design.



Of course, you can narrow down the fixation points and only see the first few points that attracted the participant's attention.  Answering the question "What does the user see first?"  In this example, the participant looking at the flight website saw the hotel ad first.


It's not just for websites.  When you use this method for product packaging, you can tell what the consumer sees in the store during the first few seconds, and the popular understanding is that you only have 3 seconds of the consumer's attention in the store.  The use of the infographic fixation map instantly conveys to the packaging designers what the consumer sees, and what parts of the design are ignored.



The fixation maps are converted into heat maps to aggregate many participant results together.  You can see here that participants aren't seeing the "Diesel for Successful Living" message.

Thanks to Colin from IDG Consulting for providing the images!  I have used IDG for consumer research projects in the past, and I highly recommend them.

Monday
Oct262009

Procrastination: The Infographic Video

Although I really like this video by Johnny Kelly at Design You Trust (Good-Okay-Brilliant-Great job Johnny!), I not convinced this is infographics.

What do you think?  Is this infographics or illustration?

Found on The MLxperience