About

Randy Krum infographic designerRandy Krum

President of InfoNewt.
Data Visualization, Infographic Design, Visual Thinking, Product Development and Marketing professional fascinated by good infographics.  Always looking for better ways to get the point across.

 

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Infographic Design

Looking for help creating your own infographics?  Randy’s infographic and data visualziation design company:

InfoNewt Infographic Design

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Caffeine Poster

The Caffeine Poster infographic

Google Insights

Sunday
Feb152009

The Browser Wars Infographic


Great timeline infographic depicting the rise and fall of different browsers portrayed as knights marching across a field.  The data set used is available here.

It took me a while to find any information about the author, but I found this description on the Wired.com blog.

Here's a creative look at the history of the browser wars from 2002 through mid-2008. The infographic was submitted to Reddit by a user named BovingdonBug. He says he created it as part of an application for a graphic design job on a newspaper.
 Thanks Alwyn for the link!

Monday
Feb092009

"The Graph" - The Future of Solar Power


Known as "The Graph" in scientific circles, this chart projects the future of solar power.  It was highlighted in a Fast Company article in December 2008.
The Graph was created by a scientific organization that counsels the German government, but it has since become a prized piece of propaganda, embedded in glossy brochures and PowerPoint presentations by solar companies from California to gray-skied Saxony. At the left-hand, present-tense end of the scale, solar power is a microscopic pencil line of gold against the thick, dark bands of oil and natural gas and coal, an accurate representation of the 0.04% of the world's electricity produced by solar power as of 2006. The band grows slowly thicker for 20 years or so, and then around 2040 a dramatic inversion occurs. The mountain-peak lines indicating the various fossil fuels all fall steeply away, leaving a widening maw of golden light as solar power expands to fill the space. By 2060, solar power is the largest single band, and by 2100 it is by far the majority share.

Friday
Feb062009

ARRRRR! Where are the Pirates?!?


I had to post this one.  TorrentFreak.com revealed that The Pirate Bay has quietly released a Google powered map site that shows the locations of the bit-torrent clients.  Of course they carefully maintain the anonymity of their users.


You can click on the icon over a particular country to see their statistics.  From everything I hear, I would have thought the U.S. to have more pirates...ARRRRR!

Thanks Alwyn!

Wednesday
Feb042009

One Month of Spam


From TimGraham.net, Tim plotted out some statistics about all of the spam email he received in February 2008. 

Tim, only 208.5 spam emails a day?  You need to get your email address out into more public places!

Thanks for the link Alwyn!

Tuesday
Feb032009

Mapping the Growth of Target


Nathan Yau over on FlowingData.com has done a great job creating an animated map showing the growth of Target stores across the U.S.
Well, fortune was smiling on me last week, and I got a hold of data for Target opening dates and locations (thnx, Cole). So here it is - a map that shows the growth of Target from 1962 through 2008.
Nathan has promised to combine the data from this map with his previous work mapping The Growth of WalMart, into one map where you can see the differences.  So we'll keep our eyes out for that.

Friday
Jan302009

The Best Beer in America


Mike Wirth, The Beer Geek, created this map of award winning beers using 20 years of data of the Great American Beer Festival medal winners from 1987-2007. Originally created for the Lyke 2 Drink blog, it also shows the breweries with the most medals and the specific beers with the most awards.

Great work Mike!

UPDATE: Mike has put up an updated version of the Best Beer in America map.

Wednesday
Jan282009

The Ultimate Mammal Family Tree


This is very cool.  Going back 166 million years to see each of the branches where we share common mammalian ancestors.  The PDF is available for download, and is very detailed.  You need to zoom a long way to even see that there is text naming each of the known mammals in existence today.  It's a radial family tree that also represents a timeline as you move outwards from the center.  Here we are:

 
 

ABC TV in Australia did a short video on the family tree hosted by Dr. Paul Willis, and he literally walks around the infographic describing different parts.  Well done, and seemed very reminiscent of Carl Sagan in some of his shows.  The video credits Robin Beck, a Mammalian Systematist as the University of NSW, of creating the family tree.  Here's the link to the ABC page where you can watch the video, or you can click on the image below.


Thanks for the link Alwyn!  Great find!

Tuesday
Jan272009

The Life of a Web Article


Great infographic from the team at Eliiance.com showing how web content (articles) gets from publishing to actual consumption by online viewers.

Monday
Jan262009

Modern Day Pirates


Pirates infographic from the Russian News and Information Agency.  These are real pirates at sea (not online pirates stealing software, music and movies).  433 victims and 292 kidnappings in 2007! (EDITED: there were only 5 deaths, not 433)
Article 100 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) requires that all states fight against piracy.  The annual damage from piracy to the global economy is around 15 billion Euros ($12 Billion).
This one and many other infographics are available online at the Russian News and Information Agency's infographics page.

Friday
Jan232009

Why Do Freeways Come to a Stop?


This is a simple, good infographic that seeks to explain why traffic on freeways slows to a crawl without any apparent reason to drivers.  By Stephen J. Beard and Rich Exner in The Plain Dealer.

EDIT: Here's a link to the original article, and a high-res PDF of the infographic.